Jun 16, 2019  
College Catalog 2017-2018 
    
College Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

Environmental Technology

  
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    ENV 110 Field Experience in Environmental Technology - Geoscience

    Credits: (1)
    A one credit field course designed for those students contemplating a career in Environmental Technology. The class will visit active, unrestricted sites currently undergoing remediation for soil and/or water contamination. Sampling protocols and proper field notetaking will be practiced. Two classroom sessions and two all day field trips during the fall semester.
  
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    ENV 162 Biofuels, Biomaterials, and Alternative Energy Technologies

    Credits: (3)
    This course will provide a general overview of various current and emerging bio-based and other sustainable technologies for the production of energy, fuels, and materials. ENV 162 will introduce the fundamentals of the biorefinery concept for sustainable manufacturing, along with more detailed investigations of specific bioprocesses and renewable energy technologies. Specifically, the course will highlight several biomaterials (i.e. bio-plastics, - chemicals, -pharmaceuticals), biofuels (i.e. bio-ethanol, -butanol, - methanol, -diesel, -methane, and - hydrogen), and alternative energy technologies (i.e. wind, solar, hydrological, geothermal, and fuel cells). Prerequisite(s): CHE 171   (formerly CHE 103) or BIO 151 .
  
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    ENV 165 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides a comprehensive overview, covering all facets of hazardous waste management and emergency response. Topics include practical exercises and training, which may be applied to business, industry, construction and institutions, including Federal and State rules and regulations, handling procedures and proper operation of a designated waste facility, storage, labeling, manifesting, shipment, employee training, proper use of safety equipment, emergency response procedures (spills response and clean up), cost-effective waste reduction, and environmental reporting procedures. This course is offered as a one week 40-hour course over the winter intersession and will provide 40-Hour Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) certification as specified in OSHA 29CFR 1910.120.
  
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    ENV 201 Internship in Environmental Technology

    Credits: (2)
    This course is designed for students in their last semester of the ENV.AAS degree program, enabling them to gain real world experience with a private consulting firm or government agency. Students will spend a minimum of 40 hours working with a qualifying business or agency and attend two three-hour seminars. Prerequisite(s): ENV 101 .

English as a Second Language

  
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    ESL 087 Basic Reading and Vocabulary Skills for ESOL Students

    Credits: (3EQ)
    This course is designed specifically for ESOL students for the purpose of improving reading comprehension and vocabulary as preparation for college-level reading. The reading component will focus on improving comprehension at literal, inferential, and evaluative levels, using a variety of literary genres and non-fiction texts. The vocabulary component will focus on efficient methods of deriving meaning from context, Latin and Greek roots and affixes, and the dictionary. Prerequisite(s): LOEP Placement Test and Speaking Interview Co-requisite(s): ESL 098 .
  
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    ESL 098 Basic Grammar, Writing and Speaking

    Credits: (3EQ)
    This is a developmental grammar and writing course for non-native English speakers who need more specific, individualized practice in using grammar for effective written and oral communication in academic settings. It also exposes students to the formal conventions of writing and speaking by providing extensive practice on several aspects of academic writing, including drafting, composing, editing and revising. Students will apply the grammatical and discursive practice necessary in becoming more familiar with all aspects of Standard American English. ESL 098 is designed to complement ESL 115  (ESOL Composition I) and prepare students for the possible cultural barriers and affective issues associated with attending college. This foundational course provides 3 equivalent credit hours towards a fulltime schedule and is based on 3 equivalent credit hours; it carries 0 credit hours of academic credit. Co-requisite(s): ESL 115 
  
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    ESL 114 Academic Listening and Speaking

    Credits: (3)
    For ESL students only. This course develops the oral and listening skills necessary for communicating effectively in an academic environment. Focus is on improving pronunciation, stress and intonation while speaking, as well as enhancing vocabulary and acquiring deeper understandings of syntactical and semantic functions of oral English. The course also teaches the skills students will need to enhance their abilities to listen for content, take notes and participate in classroom discussions.
  
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    ESL 115 ESOL Composition I

    Credits: (3)
    Designed for non-native speakers of English. Emphasis is on writing multiple drafts to produce paragraphs that are unified around a controlling idea, are substantially and coherently developed, and are effectively concluded. Writing should conform to Standard American English. Focus is on writing in response to reading and on critical thinking in reading and writing. This course does not satisfy First Year English Composition requirements. For ESOL students only. Prerequisite(s): Current ESOL placement test.
  
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    ESL 116 ESOL Composition II

    Credits: (3)
    Designed for non-native speakers of English. Emphasis is on writing multiple drafts to produce essays that are unified around a central idea, are substantially and coherently developed, and are effectively concluded. Writing should conform to Standard American English. Focus is on writing in response to reading and on critical thinking in reading and writing. This course does not satisfy first year English composition requirements. For ESOL students only. Prerequisite(s): ESL 115  or current ESOL placement test.
  
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    ESL 118 College Reading and Vocabulary for ESOL Students

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed specifically for ESOL students for the purpose of improving reading comprehension and developing learning strategies and vocabulary, all at the college level. The reading component will focus on comprehension and expanding study strategies. The vocabulary component will focus on developing knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and affixes, identifying context clues, and practicing reinforcement strategies, as well as expanding college-level vocabulary in general. Prerequisite(s): LOEP placement test. For ESOL students only.

Fire Protection Technology

  
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    FPT 111 Firefighting Standards I

    Credits: (3)
    This course will introduce the student to basic firefighting techniques and equipment. The course will follow the National Fire Protection Association 1001 Level I Standard. The student will be required to successfully complete both written and practical national accreditation exams.
  
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    FPT 112 Firefighting Standards Level II

    Credits: (3)
    This course will introduce the student to advanced firefighting techniques and equipment. The course will follow the National Fire Protection Association 1001 Level II Standards. The student will be required to successfully complete both the written and practical national accreditation exams.
  
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    FPT 121 Fire Service Supervision

    Credits: (3)
    This course will follow the guidelines of the National Fire Protection Association 1021 Levels I and II Fire Officer Training and Professional Qualifications. Supervision, motivation, leadership, discipline, communication, and problem solving will be studied individually and in group activity.
  
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    FPT 141 Fire Service Instructor

    Credits: (3)
    This course will focus on the information and skills necessary for fire service instructors to meet the requirements of NFPA 1041 Levels I and II. Beginning with analysis of the challenges, safety issues and legal considerations fire instructors will face, students will consider dimensions of the learning process as well as strategies and approaches for planning, delivering, managing and evaluating fire service training.
  
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    FPT 150 Introduction to Fire Protection

    Credits: (3)
    A survey course dealing with the broad field of fire suppression. Included are statistics of fire loss, agencies involved in fire protection, basic organization and functions of a fire department, private fire protection, fire prevention methods, and a review of current and future fire protection problems.
  
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    FPT 151 Building Construction

    Credits: (3)
    A study of types of building construction by systems and methods with particular emphasis on fire problems peculiar to each type. Causes and indications of building collapse. The New York State Building Code viewed from construction requirements with emphasis on fire and public safety provisions. Effect of fire on construction materials. Standard methods of testing and rating materials for flame spread characteristics.
  
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    FPT 152 Firefighting Tactics and Strategy

    Credits: (3)
    Deals with the effective utilization of manpower, equipment, and apparatus. Emphasis will be placed on fire-planning, fire ground organization, large fire tactical problems, command functions, utilization of staff personnel, communications procedures, water supply problems, and strategic considerations of community protection during large fires or major emergencies.
  
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    FPT 153 Legal Aspects of Fire Protection

    Credits: (3)
    A study of the police power; considerations of liability, negligence, rights and responsibilities of fire department members while performing their duties. The law of arson and its specific application, an examination of the various court systems. A study of the See v. Seattle decision and its effect on fire prevention activities.
  
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    FPT 155 Hazardous Materials

    Credits: (3)
    A study of the chemical and physical characteristics of hazardous materials such as explosives, flammable and combustible liquids, oxidizing and corrosive materials, compressed gases and radioactive materials. Emphasis will be placed on storage, handling, and fire control procedures.
  
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    FPT 156 Fire Hazards and Their Control

    Credits: (3)
    A study of common and special fire hazards of both the causative and contributive types. Identification and evaluation of degree of severity are stressed, together with appropriate means of control of hazards. Relevant local and national codes and standards are emphasized.
  
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    FPT 157 Fire Hydraulics

    Credits: (3)
    A course in incompressible fluids covering principles of fluid statics and dynamics, pipe friction, flow measurements, orifice calculations, pumps and other hydraulic devices. Applications are related to fire protection systems and equipment. Public water system design with reference to American Insurance Association standards will be covered.
  
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    FPT 158 General Chemistry for Fire Science

    Credits: (3)
    A study of general chemistry from the viewpoint of hazardous material. Aspects of combustion are studied in detail. A prerequisite for advanced Fire Science course dealing with hazardous materials. No laboratory.
  
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    FPT 159 Chemistry for Hazardous Materials

    Credits: (3)
    A study of general chemistry from the viewpoint of hazardous material. Aspects of combustion are studied in detail. A prerequisite for advanced Fire Science course dealing with hazardous materials. No laboratory.
  
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    FPT 160 General Physics for Fire Science

    Credits: (3)
    A one-semester study of selected topics in general physics for students enrolled in the Fire Science curriculum. Includes topics in mechanics, fluid mechanics, electricity, heat. No laboratory.
  
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    FPT 162 Introduction to Incident Safety

    Credits: (3)
    A survey course covering a wide range of safety topics applicable to Business, Industry, Construction and Institutions. Included are the history and objectives of the safety profession; specific activities such as hazard evaluation, accident analysis and record keeping, and specialized topics such as material handling, workers compensation, fire protection and industrial hygiene. The course will enhance the knowledge of those with limited experience in safety while providing a basic understanding of the role of the safety profession.
  
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    FPT 163 Safety Management Health

    Credits: (3)
    Designed to provide an overview of the basic concepts of Modern Safety management Systems that are used to develop and maintain an effective safety program. It will aid present and future safety managers in developing a formal safety program. In particular, the following sections are covered: Introduction, Basic Safety Concepts and Methods, Principles of Safety Management, and Special Techniques, Problems, and Auxiliary Functions. The students will prepare class assignments to reinforce their understanding of the concepts presented and gain actual experience in developing a formal Safety and Health program.
  
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    FPT 250 Fire Department Administration

    Credits: (3)
    A study of the administrative aspects of Fire Department operation. Included for study are basic administrative and management procedures, personnel administration, budget keeping, record systems, operational study techniques, public relations, line and staff functions, supervisory responsibilities, and related subjects. Emphasis will be placed on current administrative problems, and methods of developing solutions to these problems.
  
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    FPT 251 Fire Protection Systems

    Credits: (3)
    A study of fire detection and extinguishing devices and systems of both automatic and manual types. Included for study are fire extinguishing agents, portable extinguishing equipment, fixed systems of various types, and detection and signaling systems. Stress will be placed on the operating characteristics, advantages and limitations, and methods of inspection and testing.
  
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    FPT 252 Fire Investigation

    Credits: (3)
    This course deals with the proper methods of investigating fires of both accidental and incendiary types. The fundamentals of arson investigation are covered, including handling of evidence, liaison with police services in criminal fires, and interrogation of witnesses. Also included are use of photography and scientific aids to investigation.
  
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    FPT 253 Fire Prevention and Inspection

    Credits: (3)
    This course deals with the establishment of an effective community fire prevention program. Included for study are the organization of a fire prevention bureau, necessary codes and ordinances, establishment of an effective inspection program, record keeping procedures, handling of orders and complaints, and development of an adequate public education and information program.
  
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    FPT 254 New York State Code Compliance

    Credits: (4)
    This course introduces the practices necessary for students to know to become New York State Code Compliance Technicians. Course content includes all material offered through the NYS Code courses 9A, 9B, and 9C. Major topics include administration and enforcement, principles of fire-safe design, and inspection of existing buildings and facilities. Students who successfully complete the course, including 100% participation, will be eligible to take the NYS Certification examination for Code Compliance Technician.
  
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    FPT 262 Fire Investigation II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is intended to provide the student with advanced technical knowledge on case law as it pertains to fire investigation, interpreting the effects of Fire Dynamics on fire investigations, evidence collection and preservation techniques, scene documentation, case preparation and courtroom testimony. Prerequisite(s): FPT 151 , FPT 158 , FPT 252 , and permission of instructor.

French

  
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    FRE 101 Elementary French I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of French. Students acquire basic grammar and lexical skills that will enable them to communicate in routine social or professional situations within an authentic cultural context. Topics may include, but are not limited to the following: biographical information, relationships, preferences, leisure activities, clothing and other belongings, and making plans for the future. Upon successful completion of FRE 101, students may enroll in FRE 102 . This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC.
  
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    FRE 102 Elementary French II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a sequel to Elementary French I. It builds upon the basic grammatical, linguistic, communicative and cultural concepts learned in FRE 101 . Students learn to communicate in the context of an increasing number of daily life topics. Topics may include, but are not limited to the following: food and shopping, daily routines, urban and commercial contexts, travel, and the arts. Upon successful completion of FRE 102, students may enroll in FRE 201 . This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC.
  
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    FRE 201 Intermediate French I

    Credits: (3)
    This dynamic course draws upon previously acquired knowledge, while introducing students to more complex grammatical and lexical structures to further develop communicative proficiency and cultural knowledge. The course is conducted mostly in French. Upon successful completion of FRE 201, students may enroll in FRE 202. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at Onondaga.
  
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    FRE 202 Intermediate French II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a sequel to Intermediate French I. It expands upon complex grammatical and lexical structures. It is conducted entirely in French and provides a solid foundation for advanced study. Upon completion of FRE 202, students may enroll in any intermediate-high level course. Students who successfully complete the FRE level have fulfilled their language requirement for the AA in Humanities and Teacher Prep Programs. The three additional credits may be taken in a Humanities elective instead of in a language course. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at OCC. Prerequisite(s): FRE 201 , 5 years of high school French, or permission of instructor.
  
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    FRE 205 French Conversation, Composition and Reading I

    Credits: (3)
    This learner-centered, intermediate-high level course, taught entirely in French, introduces students to literary concepts and French literature. It includes intensive work in conversation and composition. Solid preparation in grammar is recommended. Prerequisite(s): FRE 202  or equivalent, five years of high school French, or permission of instructor.

Food Service Administration

  
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    FSA 100 Food Service Sanitation

    Credits: (2)
    Designed and approved by the National Restaurant Association Education Foundation so that students may become certified in Sanitation and Safety. The course is an intensive study of proper sanitation and safety through purchasing, storage, preparation, service of food, and hiring of personnel. Must be taken prior to/with FSA 103 .
  
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    FSA 101 Cooking Basics

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to provide information and skill practice in the basic fundamentals of cooking and baking. Areas of cookery to be covered are baking and hot and cold food preparation. Nutritional food selection and cultural influences on the American diet will also be emphasized. Required attire: white bib apron and white bakers cap, closed toe shoes and long pants.
  
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    FSA 103 Basic Food Preparation

    Credits: (4)
    The goals of this course are to give the student a working knowledge of basic food preparation on a small quantity scale and the scientific principles behind it. Areas of concentration will be: meat cookery, cold food preparation, and baking. Major hospitality and institutional food service applications will be covered. Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): FSA 100 . Approved uniform required.
  
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    FSA 104 Restaurant Operations

    Credits: (4)
    Designed to elaborate on the techniques of food preparation and dining room service in a restaurant. Emphasis will be placed on practical application of cooking techniques and dining room service for various types of food service facilities. Students will function in all positions of employment, gaining skills in such areas as quantity food production, menu development, waiter/waitress service, food estimation, intermediate management responsibilities, inventory principles, and food production systems analysis. Prerequisite(s): FSA 100  and FSA 103 , or permission of instructor. Approved uniform required.
  
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    FSA 112 Creative and Functional Culinary Presentation

    Credits: (1)
    This culinary arts course will consist of lecture, demonstration, and hands-on work by all students. Topics to be covered are the use of key main ingredients in the preparation of appetizers, soups, salads, and entrees. Important points of mise en place, production issues, equipment selection and use, taste, color, and selection of appropriate ingredients to properly present his/her culinary creation. Prerequisite(s): FSA 103 , or advanced level culinary skills.
  
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    FSA 114 Patisserie I

    Credits: (1)
    This culinary arts course teaches concepts, skills and techniques for preparing dessert items. Topics to be covered include: individual pastries and desserts, decorative chocolate and sugar, pate choux and finishing of cakes. A materials fee will be charged. Prerequisite(s): FSA 103 , or advanced-level culinary skills and permission of instructor.
  
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    FSA 116 Artisanal Bread Baking

    Credits: (1)
    This course is an advanced level baking course building on skills acquired in FSA 103 , or equivalent skills. Students will learn to combine artisanal bread making science and theory with hands-on practice to develop skill and technique in the production of various bread products. The course will emphasize fermented breads such as baguettes, brioche and other preferments. Uniform required; product fee.
  
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    FSA 201 Hospitality Management

    Credits: (3)
    A continuation of the study of management functions as they relate to the food service industry. This second level course covers the principles of personnel management and product merchandising necessary for the successful operation of food service facilities.
  
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    FSA 202 Food Service Cost Controls

    Credits: (3)
    A detailed study of how to set up and maintain cost control systems. The course focuses on important areas such as how to gather and use cost control information, profit planning, and the economics of the food service industry. Prerequisite(s): BUS 102  and BUS 105 .
  
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    FSA 204 Purchasing, Storage and Handling

    Credits: (3)
    A study of the fundamental principles and practices of purchasing, storing, and handling food items and supplies needed in restaurants, hotels, and institutions. The student will acquire working knowledge of such concepts as standards, grades, specifications, methods of ordering, requisitions, and the use of production records, proper receiving procedures, storage methods, issuing, and proper temperatures and holding items.
  
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    FSA 207 Menu Planning and Equipment Selection

    Credits: (3)
    Designed to provide the student with the knowledge and skills necessary to properly plan a menu and the physical food service layout to produce and serve that menu. Topics to be covered will relate to various menu types along with the proper production and design layout. The student will create a business plan for establishing a food service operation.
  
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    FSA 210 Catering and Advanced Culinary Arts

    Credits: (4)
    This course is designed for students who have successfully completed a basic food preparation principle course and quantity food preparation/restaurant operations course. The course will provide the fundamentals for operating and working in a catering organization. Through the operation of an on campus curriculum-based catering organization, the student will rotate through all positions within a catering business. Students will also develop skills in special areas of food preparation such as hors d’oeuvres, baking and pastry, American, and International cuisines. Prerequisite(s): FSA 100 , FSA 103 , and FSA 104 . Additional cost to student for curriculum approved uniform.
  
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    FSA 217 Fundamentals of Chocolates

    Credits: (1)
    This course focuses on the principles and techniques of chocolate tempering and preparing chocolate pralines, truffles, and chocolate-dipped candies utilizing a variety of different chocolates, fillings, and decorating techniques. Students will have the opportunity to design and create chocolate showpieces and amenities, using chocolate and various decorating techniques. Prerequisite(s): FSA 103  or advanced culinary or pastry skills. Approved uniform required
  
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    FSA 218 Classic Tortes

    Credits: (1)
    This course teaches concepts, skills, and techniques for preparing classical tortes. Topics to be covered are batter and genoise cakes butter, Ganache cream, Italian butter cream, and Chantilly cream frosting. Sugar and marzipan work. In each class session students will be introduced to a topic and have the opportunity to practice preparing various classical tortes. Prerequisite(s): FSA 103  or advanced culinary skills.
  
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    FSA 219 Cake Decorating

    Credits: (1)
    This course focuses on concepts, skills and techniques for advanced cake decorating. Topics to be covered are preparing and icing cakes, design techniques, butter cream basics, gum paste sugar flowers, ornaments, inscription, drapery and toppers for cakes. In each class session, students will be introduced to a topic and have the opportunity to practice decorating cakes. Prerequisite(s): FSA 103  or advanced culinary or pastry skills. Approved uniform required.
  
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    FSA 220 International Cuisine

    Credits: (2)
    This course is a study of the terminology, cooking techniques, and menu planning of foods from around the world. Asian, Mediterranean, South American, North American, and European cuisines are explored. In each class session, students will be introduced to a topic and have the opportunity to practice international cuisine. Prerequisite(s): FSA 103 , or advanced culinary pastry skills with permission of instructor. Approved uniform required.
  
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    FSA 230 Entrepreneurship in Hospitality

    Credits: (3)
    This course prepares students to have a clear understanding of the various issues relating to new venture/product development, such as food safety and sanitation, identifying and refining viable ideas and concepts, forecasting demand, business analysis, and designing and implementing successful marketing strategies for new ventures/products. The course will also examine how to finance an idea and create an organizational structure to support the venture/product. Field trips, guest speakers and case studies bring the topics alive and anchor discussion in the real world. Developing prototypes and marketing and selling goods and services will also be covered. Students enrolled in this class will operate the Hospitality Department retail shop. Prerequisite(s): FSA 103  and BUS 102  or permission of instructor; Co-requisite(s): FSA 230L. This class will meet for 2 one hour lectures and a 3 hour lab. Lab: Production lab will produce products for the retail operation. (Department approved uniform)

First Year Seminar

  
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    FYS 101 First Year Seminar

    Credits: (1)
    First Year Seminar addresses such topics as goal setting, time management, interpersonal relationship building, communication skills, resilience, and student resource identification. The course focuses on giving first-year students the support needed to successfully navigate their college and career paths.

Geography

  
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    GEG 101 Introduction to Geography

    Credits: (3)
    The purpose of this course is to provide an introduction to the basic concepts and methodology of world regional geography. Because geography incorporates aspects from multiple disciplines, we will examine geographic regions and introduce relative location, population characteristics, cultural features, physical environment, resources, major cities, economic development and historical perspectives. Furthermore, through individual projects, each student will introduce him or herself to world affairs and how events in one place can influence events in distant locations. Finally, basic geographic concepts will be introduced to help explain the variable character of the humanized earth.
  
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    GEG 203 Globalization and the World Economy

    Credits: (3)
    This course investigates how the global economic system works within a spatial framework. It focuses on the production, distribution and consumption of wealth in society and why wealth is not evenly distributed globally, regionally and locally. Topics covered include the shift from command economies to market economies in the former communist bloc; the American era of Fordism and the dollar; the shift to flexible specialization/production and its impact on laborers today; and the new space-economy dominated by strategic alliances, sourcing, free trade zones and trading blocs. A global perspective will be used to discuss the topics in the course.

General Studies

  
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    GEN 152 Human Adjustment

    Credits: (3)
    A learning experience through which students may derive a better understanding of themselves, their relationships to others, and how they adjust to their environment. Students learn about the process of adjustment and are introduced to concepts and skills that promote adjustment. Current theories in psychology provide the framework for discussion of topics that include self-concept, identity, personality, aging, sex role, stress and health, and maladjustment.
  
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    GEN 154 Comparative Vocational Planning

    Credits: (3)
    Designed to introduce students to methods of occupational planning and to expose them to available career choices. Integrated concepts include an evaluation of individual capabilities, preferences and goals. Students will also learn about the processes of the job search, resume writing, and interviewing.

Geology

  
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    GEO 105 Oceanography

    Credits: (3)
    Introductory survey of oceanography relating the physical, chemical, geological, biological, meteorological, and engineering aspects of the field. This course satisfies the science elective requirement of the Math-Science curriculum and also satisfies the science requirement of those curricula which require science. Three class hours or equivalent per week.
  
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    GEO 105L Oceanography Laboratory

    Credits: (1)
    Includes investigation of ocean waters in terms of physical and chemical properties, and the interactions of the water on air, sediments, coastal areas, and life forms. This course is intended for those who wish to deepen their understanding of oceanography and/or have a laboratory science requirement to satisfy. One three-hour session per week.
  
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    GEO 106 Environmental Geology

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the principles of applied geological science related to solving environmental problems. As such the course provides an introduction into scientific studies of human interaction with the geologic environment, including the lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere. Topics of study will include human population dynamics, soil generation and erosion, energy and mineral resources and management, waste management and disposal, water resources and water rights, water and air pollution, climate change, and related geologic principles that interact with these environmental problems. This course, along with its optional laboratory course GEO 106L , satisfies the requirements of those curricula demanding a science or laboratory science course. Only GEO 106L  may be used with this course to represent a single laboratory science course. Prerequisite(s): MAT 087  or higher. GEO 106 consists of three one-hour lectures or equivalent.
  
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    GEO 106L Environmental Geology Lab

    Credits: (1)
    This is a laboratory component to the Environmental Geology lecture (GEO 106 ). The laboratory provides practical hands-on experience for applied geological problems. Topics of study will involve waste management and methods of waste disposal including: sewage treatment, landfilling, recycling, waste minimization, and incineration. In addition, surface water and ground water hydrogeology will be investigated, especially in terms of groundwater resources. Basic mapping skills will also be investigated. Lastly, laboratory identification of rocks and minerals will be included in laboratories, while considering the economic uses and availability of these rocks & minerals. This course is intended for those who wish a deeper understanding of environmental geology and/or have a laboratory science requirement to satisfy. Prerequisite(s): MAT 087  or higher; co-requisite GEO 106 . The class will consist of one three-hour session per week.
  
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    GEO 107 Violent Earth: Natural Hazards and Disasters

    Credits: (3)
    In this course, students will investigate the earth processes that have a direct, often sudden and violent, impact on human society. Tornadoes, floods, wildfires, earthquakes, hurricanes, droughts, and volcanic eruptions are naturally occurring events that often have major impacts on humans. Students will explore the atmosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, and geosphere in their study of extreme events. Each disaster will be presented first as a hazard, then as a case study where students will investigate the human response to each extreme event and discuss prediction, risk analysis, and policy implications related to disaster preparedness, mitigation, and prevention measures. At the end of the course, students will understand the earth processes that drive hazardous events, illustrate how these processes interact with our civilization, and describe how we can better adjust to their often devastating effects. Satisfies the science elective requirement of the Math/Science curriculum and also satisfies the science requirement for those curricula that require science. GEO 107 consists of three one-hour lectures per week or equivalent.
  
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    GEO 151 Physical Geology

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the science of geology. This course considers the various rock and mineral types and their chemistry, the structures and deformation of the Earth’s crust due to plate tectonics and related phenomena like earthquakes and volcanism. It also deals with the actions of the wind, running water, ground water, and glacial ice in shaping the surface of the Earth. Topics covered include aspects of geochemistry, geophysics, geomorphology, geochronology, stratigraphy, and hydrology. This course along with its optional laboratory course GEO 151L  satisfies the sequential laboratory science requirement for the Math-Science curriculum. Prerequisite(s): MAT 087  or higher. GEO 151 consists of three one-hour lectures or equivalent.
  
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    GEO 151L Physical Geology Lab

    Credits: (1)
    This is the laboratory component to the Physical Geology lecture (GEO 151 ). The laboratory provides practical hands-on experience in a variety of geologic disciplines including: collection and analysis of geologic data, identifying common rocks and minerals samples, examination and interpreting of aerial photos, satellite images, topographic and geologic maps, and the construct and analyze topographic profiles. Techniques used in relative and absolute age dating of geologic materials, evaluation of earthquake hazards and investigation of stream and groundwater environments will also be explored. This course is intended for those who wish a deeper understanding of the science of geology and/or have a laboratory science requirement to satisfy. Co-requisite(s): GEO 151 . Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): MAT 087  or higher; One three hour session per week.
  
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    GEO 152 Historical Geology

    Credits: (3)
    A detailed study of the physical, chemical, and biological evolution of Earth utilizing concepts and principles introduced in Physical Geology. Stratigraphic and tectonic principles are utilized in the interpretation of geologic history with emphasis on regional geologic history. Both lecture and laboratory will include fossil identification, geologic mapping, microscopic analysis of rocks and fossils, and fieldtrips using geologic field techniques. Prerequisite(s): GEO 151  and GEO 151L . GEO 152 consists of three one-hour lectures or equivalent per week.
  
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    GEO 152L Historical Geology Laboratory

    Credits: (1)
    This laboratory component to Historical Geology Lecture (GEO 152 ) provides hands on application to theories and concepts discussed in the lecture component. Student will revisit the most common rock forming minerals and rocks while learning how to interpret geologic maps. A main theme of this laboratory is identifying fossils and their paleoecology. Students will learn field techniques such as measuring stratigraphic columns, using a brunton compass, and determining the speed of dinosaurs based from trackways. Multiple fieldtrips during lab will provide ample application of field techniques and environmental interpretation. Common fossils found in New York state will be emphasized, but students will also have an overview of Earth’s total 4.56 billion year history of evolution. This laboratory is designed to provide a student the opportunity to use geologic and evolutionary principles. Prerequisite(s): GEO 151 , GEO 151L . One three hour session per week. GEO 152  must be taken previously or concurrently with GEO 152L.
  
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    GEO 205 Hydrology

    Credits: (4)
    This course introduces students to fundamental concepts and methods of analysis pertaining to the flow of surface/groundwater, water resources, water quality and contamination. Laboratory and classroom experience will include: the physics of water; descriptions and mathematics of water’s movement in the surface water, vadose and groundwater settings; basic elements of soil mechanics and soil description; exploratory drilling and well installation; conducting and analyzing a pump test; surface water flow analysis and measurement; and analysis techniques of water chemistry. Several laboratories involve field work in and around the Onondaga campus measuring stream flow, installing and developing wells, testing wells, and collecting water samples. This course prepares students for the environmental field (governmental and consulting) and graduate programs in the environmental and hydrologic sciences. Prerequisite(s): MAT 143  or MAT 151 . Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.
  
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    GEO 290 Geology and Marine Ecology of the Bahamas

    Credits: (3)
    A semester-long class that includes a 9-day fieldtrip to San Salvador, Bahamas, where students conduct field research and write a research report. Class introduces students to the geology, marine biology, and tropical ecology of San Salvador, Bahamas. Environments, present and past, to be studied by both snorkeling and hiking include: beach, intertidal, coral reef, eolian, and platform interior. Studies include lectures, exercise, and quizzes at OCC and at the Gerace Research Center on San Salvador, Bahamas. Students will conduct field research on a geological, biological, or ecological question with other students, keep a field notebook, and write a research paper when they return to OCC. Prerequisites: Program is open to undergraduate students who have had a college level science course with a laboratory and have permission of the professor. There is an additional course fee that pays for student travel, books, and room and board while in San Salvador, Bahamas.

German

  
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    GER 101 Elementary German I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of German. Students acquire basic grammar and lexical skills that will enable them to communicate in routine social or professional situations within an authentic cultural context. Topics may include, but are not limited to the following: biographical information, relationships, preferences, housing, daily routines and activities, and making plans. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC. Upon successful completion of GER 101, students may enroll in GER 102 .
  
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    GER 102 Elementary German II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a sequel to GER 101 Elementary German I . It builds upon the basic grammatical, linguistic, communicative and cultural concepts learned in GER 101 . Students learn to communicate in the context of an increasing number of daily life topics. Topics may include, but are not limited to the following: food and dining, urban and commercial contexts, clothing and other belongings, health and emergencies, leisure activities and travel plans. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC. Prerequisite(s): GER 101  or permission of instructor.

Health

  
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    HEA 106 Studies in Health and Wellness

    Credits: (1)
    Wellness is a dynamic process of balancing multiple lifestyle factors to achieve personal heartiness and happiness. The connections between personal choices and health outcomes are emphasized, along with recognition of the signs and symptoms of common causes of illness and death in the United States. Students will be introduced to strategies and resources which enable them to make informed decisions about their wellness. Topics discussed include: stress management, diet, substance use, relationships, sex and sexuality, exercise, and chronic and communicable diseases.
  
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    HEA 207 Personal Health

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an exploration into the dimensions of wellness stressing the importance of personal responsibility for positive health and well-being. Emphasis is placed on improving health related knowledge within a variety of personal health topic areas so the student becomes proficient at analyzing health related information and making informed decisions leading to higher levels of wellness. Strategies and resources which enable students to make informed choices about behaviors will also be explored. Prerequisite(s): There is no prerequisite to this course.
  
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    HEA 208 Human Sexuality

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides an overview of the biological, psychological, and cultural aspects of human sexuality. Topics include historical influences and cultural variation, the development of sex roles and their influence on sexual behavior, the anatomy and physiology of the sex organs and their response during sexual stimulation, methods of birth control, pregnancy and childbirth, sexually transmitted diseases, sexual dysfunctions, sexual variations, and coercive sexual behavior.
  
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    HEA 209 Drugs and Wellness

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the physiological, psychological, and sociological effects of drug use, abuse, and dependency on wellness. Topics covered enable students to make informed decisions about drug use including: over-the-counter drugs, prescription drugs, herbal remedies, dietary supplements, caffeine, tobacco, alcohol and illicit drugs. In addition, community resources that assist individuals with drug dependence will be identified to assist individuals with wellness. Prerequisite(s): There are no prerequisites for this course.
  
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    HEA 213 Stress and Well-Being

    Credits: (3)
    The fundamental theories of the stress response and its relationship to specific states of dis-ease are explored through a deeper understanding of the interconnectivity of the physical, mental, emotional, and spiritual aspects of well-being. Students are introduced to knowledge and practices that will alter perceptions, language, and behaviors to assist them in changing from external to internal locus of control. A variety of stress management techniques are discussed and practiced with the intent of motivating students to adopt life-long practices.

Health First Aid

  
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    HFA 203 Responding to Emergencies

    Credits: (2)
    This course is designed to develop safety consciousness and train individuals in the skills and emergency procedures necessary to render assistance to others. It stresses the basic steps for handling cardiac emergencies with adults, infants and children, along with the first aid skills necessary for treating soft tissue injuries, bleeding control, and other sudden illnesses. All of these skills are taught under American Red Cross standards leading to certification in CPR, First Aid, and use of the Automated External Defibrillator (AED) device. This course is appropriate for home and working environments, and is not intended for professional rescuers. This course does not meet the Health or Physical Education activity requirement.
  
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    HFA 204 Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation

    Credits: (1)
    Taught under American Red Cross standards, this course offers professional rescuer certification. Students will learn to provide initial care for breathing and cardiac emergencies to adults, infants and children. Included: two-rescuer CPR, use of a resuscitation mask, bag-valve-mask and AED. The course is intended for public safety personnel, athletic trainers, lifeguards emergency response teams and health care professionals. (Does not meet Health or Physical Education requirements).
  
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    HFA 214 CPR Recertification

    Credits: (0.5)
    Taught under American Red Cross guidelines. This course is for public safety personnel, lifeguards, athletic trainers, emergency response team members and health care professionals who need to update and recertify in professional rescuer skills. Prerequisite(s): Current CPR card issued within one year or permission of instructor.
  
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    HFA 215 Community CPR and First Aid

    Credits: (1)
    Taught under American Red Cross guidelines. This course leads to certification in Community CPR and First Aid and stresses the basic steps to follow in recognizing and caring for breathing and cardiac emergencies in adults, infants and children. Includes first aid skills for soft tissue injuries, bleeding control, splinting and other sudden illnesses. Appropriate for home and working environments. This course is not intended for professional rescuers. There are no prerequisites for this course.

History

  
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    HIS 101 World History I

    Credits: (3)
    World History I is the first in a two-course sequence tracing the rise of world civilizations. It will examine the social, political, intellectual, and economic development of civilizations in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the beginning until the 16th century. Main themes are the Neolithic revolution, urbanization, early empires, conflicts, and interconnections through trade, culture, and religions. More broadly the course will expose students to the use of primary and secondary sources and to the identification of change over time, causality, and contingency in historical knowledge.
  
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    HIS 102 World History II

    Credits: (3)
    World History II is the second in a two-course sequence tracing the rise of world civilizations. It will examine the modern social, political, intellectual, and economic development of civilizations in Eurasia, Africa, and the Americas from the 16th century to the present. Main themes include interdependency between the old and the new world, splendor, trade, and power in China, India, the Ottoman Empire, and Africa, the formation of modern citizenship in a global perspective, the great divergence, imperialism and decolonization, and the contemporary integrated world. More broadly the course will expose students to the use of primary and secondary sources and to the identification of change over time, causality, and contingency in historical knowledge.
  
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    HIS 103 History of Western Civilization

    Credits: (3)
    The course is a survey of western civilization and culture that emphasizes political, economic, social, religious, and intellectual developments. Students are introduced to contemporary source materials and to interpretive works of the major participants in western civilization from the Ancient World to the Renaissance. Some of the major historical movements to be covered include: the First Civilizations, Ancient Greece and Rome, Early Christianity, the decline of the Roman Empire, Rome’s Successors, Byzantium, Early Islam, the Medieval Church, the Vikings, the Crusades, the Hundred Years’ War, and the Renaissance. Prerequisite(s): There are no prerequisites.
  
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    HIS 104 History of Western Civilization

    Credits: (3)
    The second in a two-course sequence: an historical survey of Western Civilization from c. 1500 to the present. It examines the political, economic, social, cultural, religious, and intellectual developments that shaped the West, including its relationship with other regions of the world. Topics covered include the Scientific Revolution, early modern state building, colonialism, the Enlightenment, the French Revolution, the rise of modern political ideologies, imperialism, the World Wars, the Cold War, and terrorism. Students will analyze primary and secondary sources. Prerequisite(s): There are no prerequisites.
  
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    HIS 105 Early American History

    Credits: (3)
    A survey of early American history emphasizing political, social, and intellectual trends. Students are introduced to works of major historians and to various interpretations of American history. The course will cover early American history from its beginnings through the early National period.
  
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    HIS 106 American History in the 19th Century

    Credits: (3)
    A continuation of HIS 105 , covering American history from the early National period through the 19th century.
  
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    HIS 107 Modern American History

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the history of the United States from 1900 to the present. A continuation of HIS 105  and HIS 106 .
  
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    HIS 125 American Social History: A Film Study

    Credits: (3)
    A study of United States social and cultural movements since the late 19th century, with special emphasis on minority groups - Native Americans, African Americans, women, workers, immigrants, dissenters. In addition to lectures and books, the course will rely extensively on the use of media to illustrate the course of American history. Prerequisite(s): No prerequisite.
  
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    HIS 207 History of the North American Indian

    Credits: (3)
    A survey of American Indian history with emphasis upon pluralistic beginnings, the culture of American Indian groups, Indian-White contacts, the impact of Federal Indian policy, and persistence and change in American Indian culture. Prerequisite(s): No prerequisite, though it would be preferable to have taken HIS 105  and HIS 106 .
  
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    HIS 208 History of the Iroquois

    Credits: (3)
    This course will cover the history of the Iroquois peoples. It will describe the historical origins and development of the Iroquois Confederacy, and delve into issues that have had an impact on the confederacy over the years. Current legal problems, such as land claims, gaming, and taxing authority battles will be analyzed and discussed.
  
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    HIS 209 History of American Women

    Credits: (3)
    The course examines the experiences of American women as a group and as members of differing social classes and racial and ethnic groups in work, politics, family life, sexuality, and social organization from the seventeenth century to the present. The course aims to understand women’s lives in the context of economic, political, and social changes in the U.S.; to discover the European, Latin American, and African roots of American women’s lives; and to reconstruct our interpretation of U.S. history in light of women’s experiences.
  
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    HIS 213 End of Empire: British Imperialism Since 1900

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a study of world history and global issues through an examination of the British Empire in the twentieth century. Students will assess how British power operated and how it controlled its huge far-flung Empire. Independence movements from both the British and indigenous populations’ perspectives, and the lasting ramifications of British rule, will be investigated.
  
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    HIS 214 The Global History of Sexuality

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the scholarly study of the global history of sexuality. Its main focus is to help students develop an understanding of ancient Greek and Roman societies based on comparisons with African and Indian societies of the Early Modern and Modern periods. Students will reflect on the influence of Western society on non-Western cultures. They will explore the changing ways that individuals, moral authorities, the tribe/state and scientific experts have conceptualized sexuality and gender. Topics covered include: age and rites of passage; childhood and adulthood; marriage; conception, birth, infanticide; the family; love; male and female homosexuality; women and property; and sex and politics.
  
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    HIS 216 U.S. Foreign Policy Since 1914

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to United States foreign relations from World War I to the present. We examine foreign policies of U.S. presidents, debates among foreign policy analysts, and the way other nations have regarded the United States. Topics include imperialism, spread of American culture, the Cold War, different approaches to international cooperation, unilateralism, multilateralism, the role of military force, and changes in U.S. national security needs.
  
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    HIS 217 History of Work in America

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines labor in the United States from the early 1600s to the present, with special emphasis upon the working class and organized labor after 1830. We will explore major themes in the changing nature of work including conditions, experiences, outlooks, and conduct of workers. Topics include the history of strikes, organizing, and unionism; pink collar work; slave labor and indentured servitude; the effects of war on labor conditions; and gender and race in the workplace.
  
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    HIS 219 History of European Women Since 1500

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the history of women in Europe since the Reformation. Women in all parts of Europe, including Turkey and the European colonies, will be studied. Topics include women at work, in the family, in politics, and in communities as well as female heads of state, scientists, artists, and political activists. The course examines how European women, once defined by their family and marital status, have gained independence and individuality. The course also examines the effects on women of cultural and legal change since 1500. Sources focus on women’s perspectives on their own lives. Representations of women in film, art, and literature will be used.
  
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    HIS 221 Mayas and Aztecs: An Introduction to the History of Ancient Mesoamerica

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to the pre- Columbian peoples and cultures of Mexico and Central America, from the time of the first settlement of the Americas to the Spanish conquest of Mexico in the sixteenth century. It uses the perspectives of history and anthropology to enable students to make sense of the rich religious and architectural traditions, sophisticated calendrical and writing systems, and elaborate social and political systems that developed in this region over several millennia.
  
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    HIS 223 African American History From Africa Through the Civil War Era

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines chronologically and topically the development of African-Americans from Africa, emphasizing the West African kingdoms, through the Civil War Era. West African culture and social life will be discussed in order to show how that culture was exploited by Europeans in the development of the slave trade. Students will spend several weeks studying the development of the institution of slavery and how slaves psychologically adapted to that lifestyle. The course also emphasizes the development of free Black communities in America during this period and the motivations for and efforts of African and non-African Americans to end slavery. The course concludes with a discussion of the reality and myth of Black participation in the Civil War and Reconstruction.
  
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    HIS 224 African American History 1890 to the Present

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines, chronologically and topically, the development of African-Americans from the post-Civil War Era to the present. Students will examine African-American responses to the legal institutionalization of segregation, including migration to the West, self-segregation, self-help, education, and the vote. Between discussions of Black participation in World Wars I and II, students will investigate the Harlem Renaissance and the development of jazz and the blues. Following a discussion of the Civil Rights Movement, the course will conclude with a discussion of Black conservativism.
 

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