Oct 23, 2018  
College Catalog 2018-2019 
    
College Catalog 2018-2019

Course Descriptions


 

Automotive Technology

  
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    ATC 223 Hybrid, Electric and Alternative Fuel Vehicles

    Credits: (4)
    The course is designed to introduce the student into the theory and systems applications of modern hybrid, electric and alternative fuel vehicles, hydrogen and natural gas. All vehicle systems will be covered: HEV Technology, Hybrid Engines and Transmissions, Electric Machines, Power Inverter Systems, DC-DC Converter Systems, Hybrid Braking and Steering Systems, Battery Pack Technology. Emphasis in laboratory is placed on vehicle systems and safety. Three class hours and a three hour lab. Prerequisite(s): ATC 115 , ATC 131 , and MAT 119 , or permission of instructor; co-requisites: ATC 223L, ATC 116 , and ATC 222 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    ATC 243 Advanced Engine Performance

    Credits: (4)
    Modern engine control systems are discussed. Ignition systems and related diagnostics with an emphasis on computer-controlled fuel management are examined. Laboratory topics include gas analyzers, oscilloscopes and scanning devices.
  
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    ATC 271 Climate Controls Systems

    Credits: (3)
    Fundamentals of refrigeration and heating are analytically discussed. Concepts of modern electronic air temperature control systems are developed in the lecture. Laboratory activities focus upon service and diagnostic methods. Proper evacuation and recharging techniques applicable to current EPA standards are developed. Two class hours and a three-hour lab.
  
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    ATC 290 Cooperative Education II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to provide advanced work experience directly related to the students field of study. A learning contact, containing specific educational objectives as they relate to the specific advanced work experience and the students field of study, is developed between the student, department coordinator and the employer. There is a 120 hour minimum of work in the student co-op experience. The student is required to keep a daily work journal which provides relevant feedback to the department coordinator thereby ensuring a constant monitoring of tasks performed during the work session. Prerequisite(s): ATC 115  and ATC 142 , or approval by the Automotive Technology department.

Biology

  
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    BIO 105 Exploring Biology

    Credits: (3)
    This one-semester course introduces students to the fundamental principles governing “how life works” including cellular functions, genetics, evolution, and ecology. Emphasis is placed on the relevance of these principles to important social and personal issues such as disease and wellness, genetic technologies, and the use of environmental resources. This general education science elective is intended for students in non-science and non-health profession majors and does not fulfill a science elective for Math/Science or Computer Science majors. Three credit hours. Not open to students with credit in BIO 121  or any Biology course numbered 141 or higher. No prerequisite. Optional 1-credit laboratory is available (BIO 105L ): it must be taken concurrently with BIO 105.
  
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    BIO 105L Exploring Biology Lab

    Credits: (1)
    This optional laboratory must be taken concurrently with the companion lecture, Exploring Biology (BIO 105 ). This course introduces students to the process of science inquiry, including both descriptive and hypothesis-driven approaches. Emphasis is on collecting evidence, making appropriate conclusions, and using inquiry techniques or modeling to explore fundamental biological principles such as cellular function, genetics, evolution and ecology. One credit hour.
  
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    BIO 106 Human Biology

    Credits: (4)
    This one-semester course provides basic knowledge of the major organ systems of human beings. Emphasis is on how the body functions normally. It is intended for non-science majors and is inappropriate for students preparing for Nursing, Surgical Technology and Physical Therapy Assistant degrees. Does not fulfill the science requirement for Math/Science and Computer Science students. Three class hours, two laboratory hours.
  
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    BIO 111 Microbiology for Surgical Technology

    Credits: (1)
    This course provides an introduction to Microbiology, emphasizing aspects related to safe practice in the surgical field. The infectious process, infection control, and the role of the immune system in health and disease will be covered, in addition to the structure and properties of bacteria, fungi, viruses, and other microbes. Open only to students in the Surgical Technology program. Prerequisite(s): No prerequisite
  
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    BIO 121 Introduction to Biology

    Credits: (4)
    This introductory one-semester biology course introduces some core concepts of biology. Topics include the molecular and cellular basis of life, energy flow in biological systems, gene expression and regulation, DNA technology, inheritance, and reproduction. This course is for students who need additional preparation before attempting BIO 151  (General Biology) or BIO 171  (Anatomy and Physiology I). This general education science elective is intended for non-science majors and those pursuing careers in nursing, surgical technology, or as physical therapist assistants. Does not fulfill the science elective but can fulfill a general education requirement for students in the Math/Science program who intend to pursue 4-year degrees. Three class hours and two laboratory hours per week.
  
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    BIO 121R Introduction to Biology Recitation

    Credits: (1EQ)
    This course is an optional recitation for BIO 121  (Introduction to Biology). It provides students with the opportunity to learn new study skills and to further review course material with additional practice problems and exercises in a small group, activity-based, interactive format.
  
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    BIO 131 General Ecology

    Credits: (3)
    A study of the principles of energy and material flow through ecosystems; includes the introduction of population dynamics and community organization. This class is available for MTS science elective credit and is also recommended for students in non-science majors seeking general education science elective credit. Three class hours. Prerequisite(s): No prerequisite.
  
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    BIO 131L General Ecology Lab

    Credits: (1)
    A field and laboratory approach to ecological principles including energy and chemical flow through terrestrial and aquatic systems. Optional lab to be taken by current or former BIO 131  students. A Saturday field trip may be required, with an option for an equivalent Friday trip. No prerequisite.
  
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    BIO 147 Environmental Health

    Credits: (3)
    This course reveals how the sustained vitality of the planet is essential for maintaining the health of the societies and economies of the Earth. Major topics showing the mutual dependence of these realms of human existence (i.e., ecology, culture, and economics) are discussed. These topics include population forces, habitat alteration, pollution of air/soil and living species, water use and abuse, agricultural methods, and fuel (both fossil and renewable). Practical and attainable solutions to our current problems in these areas are emphasized. Solutions range from the personal through community, national, and global levels. Prerequisite(s): No prerequisite.
  
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    BIO 151 General Biology I

    Credits: (4)
    This course explores the molecular and cellular basis of life. Topics covered include the biochemical make-up of cells, membrane transport, cellular respiration, photosynthesis, protein synthesis, cellular division, inheritance, and evolution. Plant structure and reproduction are also introduced. This course is intended for Math/Science majors, and is the prerequisite for BIO 152 . Three class hours and two laboratory hours (hands-on, in presence of a mentoring instructor) per week. Successful completion of both high school biology and chemistry is strongly recommended. Prerequisite(s): Placement into college level ENG, ILS, and MAT.
  
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    BIO 152 General Biology II

    Credits: (4)
    This course focuses on animals and systems biology, including a survey of animal types and of the organismal biology of animals. Organisms’ methods of response and adaptation to the environment and to each other are also emphasized. Laboratory includes hands-on dissection of preserved animal specimens in a classroom setting, under the supervision of a mentoring instructor. Three class hours and 2 laboratory hours per week. BIO 152 assumes a basic knowledge of chemistry, cell structure and function, and the concepts explaining the genetic unity and evolutionary diversity of species. Prerequisite(s): BIO 151  or permission of instructor. The combination of BIO 121  and BIO 152 does NOT count as a sequence for the Math/Science degree.
  
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    BIO 161 Applied Environmental Biotechnology

    Credits: (4)
    Applied Environmental Biotechnology (BIO 161) will present the fundamentals of general, cellular, and molecular biology and then build upon these foundations in the context of applied chemistry, microbiology, and microbial ecology. This four-credit course has been developed to provide students with an understanding of the structural and metabolic characteristics of eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, in order to then develop comprehensive descriptions of important cellular-, enzymatic-, and/or microbial-based environmental and industrial processes. Specifically, the course will highlight applied biotechnological topics including applied microbiology, biochemistry, enzymology, microbial nutrient-cycling, composting, wastewater treatment, industrial fermentations, and biodegradation of chemical contaminants. BIO 161 also includes a one-credit hour laboratory component which will provide opportunities for hands-on application of concepts presented in lecture and introduces scientific techniques relevant to the fields of biotechnology. Three class hours and three laboratory hours.
  
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    BIO 171 Anatomy and Physiology I

    Credits: (4)
    First part of a two-semester study of the structure and function of the human body. Topics include homeostasis, basic chemistry, cell structure and function, tissues, and the following body systems: integumentary, skeletal, muscular, respiratory, and urinary. The cat is the primary dissection specimen in the laboratory. This course is for students preparing for Nursing, Surgical Technology, Physical Therapy Assistant, and other health-related professions. This course is inappropriate for students preparing for medicine or dentistry. It does not fulfill the lab science sequence requirement for most Math/Science students, but does fulfill the science elective requirement for Math/Science students. Three lecture hours, two laboratory hours. Students are expected to have mastered high school-level biology, chemistry, and algebra, or the college equivalents.
  
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    BIO 172 Anatomy and Physiology II

    Credits: (4)
    Second part of a two-semester study of the structure and function of the human body. The following body systems are covered: cardiovascular, nervous, endocrine, immune, digestive, and reproductive. Cat is the primary dissection specimen in the laboratory. This course is for students preparing for Nursing, Surgical Technology, Physical Therapy Assistant, and other health-related professions. This course is inappropriate for students preparing for medicine or dentistry. Does not fulfill the lab science sequence requirement for most Math/Science students, but does fulfill the science elective requirement for Math/Science students. Three class hours, two laboratory hours. Prerequisite(s): BIO 171 .
  
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    BIO 205 General Microbiology

    Credits: (4)
    An introduction to the biology of microorganisms, with an emphasis on clinical relevance. Topics include the structure and function of microbes, including their metabolism and genetics. Infectious diseases and the interactions between microbes and their hosts are also considered. Laboratory exercises emphasize the isolation, identification, and control of microorganisms. Primarily intended for students entering health professions. Not recommended for students with credit in BIO 110 or (BIO 150 - no longer offered). Prerequisite(s): BIO 151 , BIO 171 , or permission of instructor. Prior completion of either BIO 152  or BIO 172  is recommended but not required.
  
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    BIO 221 Pathology

    Credits: (3)
    This course covers the nature, causes, and development of disease conditions, as well as the structural and functional changes that result from the disease process. The principal diagnostic tests and treatments used in the detection and control of diseases will also be considered. Open only to students in the Health Information Technology program. Prerequisite(s): BIO 171  and BIO 172  (Anatomy and Physiology I and II).
  
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    BIO 253 Genetics

    Credits: (4)
    This course covers the biological basis for patterns of inheritance, including the structure, function, and regulation of DNA, genes, and chromosomes. The biochemical nature of mutations will be discussed, along with the potential consequences, both harmful and beneficial. Methods of molecular genetic analysis also will be introduced. This class is intended for Math-Science majors, especially students interested in Biology, Pre-Med, Pre-Vet, Pre-Physician Assistant, or Pre-Dent. Three lecture hours and two laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite(s): BIO 151  and BIO 152  (or equivalents) or permission of instructor.
  
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    BIO 290 Biology Research/Internship

    Credits: (1-4)
    This course immerses students in the working environment of a biological research lab or similar professional setting. Internships and research opportunities are available at universities as well as at government, corporate, and independent research institutions. Additional opportunities are available for some students through the CSTEP/LSAMP and Bridges to the Baccalaureate programs. A learning contract containing specific educational objectives is developed between the student and the Biology Department Internship Coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 60 hours of work per credit hour. In addition, the maintenance of a work/research journal to record hours worked and duties performed and a final paper or project (such as a poster or PowerPoint presentation) are required. A letter grade will be awarded by the Biology Department Internship Coordinator on the basis of successful completion of the objectives in the learning contract and satisfactory evaluations by the on-site research supervisor. No experiential credit is given for previous research work. Number of credit hours must be determined at the time of registration. Prerequisite(s): Minimum GPA 2.8; sophomore standing; approval of Biology Department Internship Coordinator; successful completion (with a grade of “C” or higher) of at least three of the following courses: BIO 151 , BIO 152 , (plus CHE 171L ), CHE 172  (plus CHE 172L ); or permission of Biology Department Internship Coordinator.

Business

  
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    BUS 101 Introduction to Business

    Credits: (3)
    This is an introductory course designed to give the student an overview of the impact of business on society. The course is intended to aid the student in obtaining a clear understanding of the way in which contemporary business functions through the interrelationships of marketing, management, and finance. It is not open to students with previous credit in BUS 121  and/orBUS 230 .
  
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    BUS 102 Mathematics of Business and Finance

    Credits: (3)
    This is a study of mathematical concepts and processes as applied to business and finance. Students will develop skills required to perform with accuracy and facility mathematical operations integral to the interpretation and solution of business problems. Arithmetic operations, signed numbers, linear equations, percentage and statistical procedures are applied to topics in accounting, retailing, risk management, banking, and finance. This course is a core course for the Business Technology A.A.S. degree and may be used to fulfill a Business or general elective requirement.  Prerequisite(s): MAT 084 , 088 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    BUS 105 Financial Accounting

    Credits: (3)
    Financial Accounting is an introduction to accounting as a means of recording business activities. The course includes a study of the classification and recording of original business transactions, the preparation and evaluation of financial statements, and the application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles. The course will incorporate appropriate computer technology in the instruction process. Prerequisite(s): MAT 088  or permission of instructor.
  
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    BUS 105R Financial Accounting Applications

    Credits: (1EQ)
    This course is designed to give additional instruction and application to the topics covered in Financial Accounting (BUS 105 ). The course includes the study of the preparation of journal entries, financial statements, merchandising activities, cash, accounts receivable, plant assets and payroll.
  
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    BUS 106 Managerial Accounting

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the fundamentals of managerial accounting emphasizing the collection, management and use of accounting information in the decision making process within an organization. Topics include a comparison of the different types of organizations and the impact on their financial statements, long-term debt and equity transactions, reporting and analysis of cash flows, procedures necessary to determine product costs, break-even analysis, profit planning, and cost analysis. The course will incorporate appropriate computer technology in the instruction process. Prerequisite(s): BUS 105 .
  
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    BUS 106R Managerial Accounting Applications

    Credits: (1EQ)
    This course is designed to give additional instruction and application of topics covered in Managerial Accounting (BUS 106 ). The course includes a study of partnerships, corporations, bonds, long-term investments, statement of cash flows, job order and process costing, break-even and standard cost variances. Prerequisite(s): BUS 105 
  
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    BUS 117 Integrated Financial Systems I

    Credits: (4)
    Computers are one of the most important tools to the accountant and users of accounting information. This course will provide extensive hands-on exposure to General Ledger Software. Skills acquired will include the ability to create and maintain general ledger master files, process transactions, and prepare Financial Statements and informational reports. Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): BUS 105 .
  
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    BUS 121 Marketing

    Credits: (3)
    An introductory course in marketing intended to make the student aware of the development and efficient distribution of goods and services for a targeted consumer segment. The course studies both consumer and industrial markets, using as the basis for study the product, the distribution, the pricing and promotional techniques.
  
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    BUS 124 Principles of Retailing

    Credits: (3)
    The principles of retailing involve all the activities necessary for the sale of goods and services to the ultimate consumer for personal, family or household use. This course examines the different types of retail institutions and dwells on store location, merchandise planning and control, pricing and promotion.
  
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    BUS 138 Supervision and Management

    Credits: (3)
    This is a practical course in the principles and techniques of management applied by first line supervisory and training personnel. Special emphasis is placed on plant operations, organizing, training, developing supervisors, evaluating performance, motivation, and supervisory leadership responsibilities.
  
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    BUS 178 Disney Corporate Communication

    Credits: (3)
    The Disney Corporate Communication Course describes how companies communicate with key audiences, both internal and external to the corporation. Course introduces students to the communication function and how companies reach a variety of publics to include customers, investors, employees, media, government and communities in relation to the corporation. The purpose of this course is to engage students in the purpose and significance of communication within an organization at many levels. Students will learn both the why, how and application of communication techniques as organizations interface with customers, employees, and the public. As a result, students should have greater understanding of and appreciation for the corporate communication process. Co-requisite(s): BUS 293 
  
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    BUS 201 Intermediate Accounting I

    Credits: (4)
    Intensive consideration is given to accounting theory and practice as it pertains to principle statement items. The course deals primarily with investments, receivables, inventories, fixed assets, and other material suitable to a second-year course in accounting. Prerequisite(s): BUS 106 .
  
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    BUS 202 Intermediate Accounting II

    Credits: (4)
    Intensive consideration is given to accounting theory and practice as it pertains to current and long-term liabilities, long-term investments in stocks, stockholders’ equity transactions, accounting for leases, and the analytical process as well as other selected topics. Prerequisite(s): BUS 201 .
  
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    BUS 203 Electronic Spreadsheets for Business I

    Credits: (3)
    The course will include an introduction to the creation and modification of spreadsheets and charts. These skills will then be expanded and applied to business situations. Topics will include, but not be limited to, the creation of spreadsheets, formatting, printing, layout options, charting, creating simple and more complex formulas, using built-in formulas and other features as appropriate. Prerequisite(s): BUS 105  or permission of instructor.
  
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    BUS 204 Electronic Spreadsheets for Business II

    Credits: (3)
    This course builds on the skills learned in Electronic Spreadsheets for Business I. Students will create, edit, and manage worksheets and workbooks to analyze and communicate data relevant to a variety of business applications. Topics include a variety of advanced functions, formulas, and analysis tools. Prerequisite(s): BUS 203 .
  
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    BUS 205 Income Tax Accounting I

    Credits: (3)
    A course in individual and business taxes under the federal income tax system. The course includes instruction and practice in the fields of individual returns, includable and tax exempt income, partnership and other informational returns, other business property and depreciation deduction, deductible losses, capital gains and losses, involuntary conversions, installment sales, etc. There will be considerable practice in return preparation in all these areas, as well as instruction. Prerequisite(s): BUS 106  or equivalent.
  
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    BUS 207 Cost Accounting

    Credits: (3)
    Basic principles of cost accounting are developed and applied to industrial situations. Topics include budgetary planning and control; income measurement and inventory valuation; accounting for costs of material, labor, and overhead; job-order, process, and standard costs systems. Prerequisite(s): BUS 106 .
  
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    BUS 210 Disney Advanced Studies in Hospitality Management

    Credits: (3)
    The Disney Advanced Studies in Hospitality Management Course is an advanced-level course that covers complex issues facing Hospitality leaders today. This course will prepare students to become entry-level managers in the Hospitality industry by exposing them to contemporary operational issues and situations, equipping them with various problem solving methods and teaching them to develop and implement strategic solutions. Topics covered include guest service, leadership, strategic planning, trends and technology, communication, marketing, human resource management, and crisis management. Class content is delivered through lectures, group discussion, learning activities, and case studies. Co-requisite(s): BUS 293  Disney Co-Op Internship.
  
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    BUS 212 Business Correspondence

    Credits: (3)
    Business communication and report writing. Theory is put into practice in the writing of representative types of business letters, memos, email, and reports. Methods of all types of business communication are studied, including oral presentation. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  or permission of instructor.
  
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    BUS 218 Disney Corporate Analysis

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides an organizational exploration of the Walt Disney Company and covers a variety of topics, including its corporate history, structure, governance, performance, and culture. In addition, students will learn more about the company’s concepts about innovation and technology, globalization, history and heritage, corporate social responsibility, and diversity and inclusion. Class content is delivered through lectures, group discussions, learning activities, and situational studies. Prerequisite(s): Full- or part-time status and minimum 2.0 G.P.A.
  
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    BUS 219 Statistics I

    Credits: (3)
    Topics covering the descriptive and inferential aspects of statistics will include: frequency distributions, graphs, measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, probability distributions, binomial and normal distributions, introduction to sampling theory, estimation theory, and hypothesis testing (mean, variance, proportions, etc.) Computer software will be used. A specified calculator will be required. Credit will not be given for both MAT 151  and BUS 219.
  
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    BUS 220 Statistics II

    Credits: (3)
    A continuation of Statistics I to include the topics: two-sample analysis, linear and multiple regression, correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics, and Chisquare goodness of fit. Time series analysis and/or statistical process control as time permits. Computer software and graphing calculator applications will be an integral component of this course. A graphing calculator with specific statistical capabilities will be required. Credit will not be given for both MAT 152  and BUS 220. Prerequisite(s): MAT 151  or BUS 219  or equivalent.
  
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    BUS 230 Principles of Management

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a study of the management process with a survey of managerial and organizational theories. Specific topics will include planning, organizing, supervision, control, labor relations, and decision-making.
  
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    BUS 231 Human Resource Management

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a study in the major areas of Human Resource Management. It includes recruitment, selection, job analysis, training, job evaluation, wage and salary administration, labor relations, and the administrative functions and responsibilities of a human resource manager.
  
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    BUS 233 Small Business Management

    Credits: (3)
    This course is the study of principles of management related to the establishment and operation of a small business enterprise. Topics will include small business start-up (economic and legal aspects), organization and financing concerns, location and facilities layout, employee relations, merchandising, and control techniques.
  
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    BUS 240 Disney Creativity and Innovation

    Credits: (3)
    The Disney Creativity and Innovation course combines theory and experiential assignments to introduce students to the main concepts of creativity and innovation. It will explore their crucial importance to individuals, organizations, and the entrepreneurial process. Students will learn various tools to promote creativity within themselves and others, processes to increase innovation, how to contribute to a creative team, how to manage creativity, and how to establish a culture of creativity within an organization. As a result, students should have greater understanding of and appreciation for the creative/innovative processes and be better able to harness and direct those forces for themselves and others. This course prepares students to contribute in a unique and productive way to today’s entrepreneurial and organizational demands. Co-requisite(s): BUS 293 .
  
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    BUS 243 Business Law I

    Credits: (3)
    The fundamentals of legal liability, of the growth of our legal institutions, and court systems. The principles of the law of contracts, negotiable instruments, and sales.
  
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    BUS 244 Business Law II

    Credits: (3)
    A study of the fundamental legal principles relating to agency relationships, sustainable business forms and practices, and other business forms to include partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations.
  
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    BUS 247 Disney Human Resources

    Credits: (3)
    The Disney Human Resource Management Course explores the human resource management function in a corporate setting and focuses on the development of knowledge and skills that all managers and leaders need. This course will focus on such subjects as the selection process, employment law, labor relations, compensation, performance development, corporate training and maintaining effective environments. The classes are designed to familiarize participants with current human resource practices and laws that apply to their careers regardless of their field. Class content is delivered through lectures, group discussion, learning activities, and case studies. Co-requisite(s): BUS 293  Co-Op Internship.
  
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    BUS 248 Disney Organizational Leader

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the universal principles of leadership, including specific application to the Disney culture. It is designed to build repeatable and transferable leadership knowledge and skills. These skills are applied both within the context of the class and in earning and living environments of the internship experience. These skills are completely transferable to commercial organizational contexts. The content is delivered by a subject-matter expert in the field of leadership through lectures, group discussions, learning activities, self-assessment, project development and presentation, and situational studies. Co-requisite(s): BUS 293  Disney Co-Op Internship.
  
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    BUS 277 Disney Marketing You: Personal and Career Development Strategies

    Credits: (3)
    The Disney College Program Marketing You Course uses directed discussion and cooperative learning experiences to both define a personal brand for career marketing and to focus students who do not have clear career objectives. This course is designed to maximize the Disney College Program Internship experience, as well as all prior/subsequent work experience, utilizing the transferable skills noted in the Secretary of Labor’s SCANS (Secretary’s Commission of Achieving Necessary Skills 1991) report. While the Disney College Program is a non-technical skill internship, it produces the type of skills required in the workplace. The student will learn how to market the SCANS report skills of communication, customer service, problem solving, conflict resolution, decision-making, self-management, and creative thinking. Key elements of the course include the development of a career focus and a personal marketing plan. The marketing plan allows a student to develop a personal brand, 30-second commercial, resume, and networking strategy. The students will also learn interviewing and negotiation techniques. Prerequisite(s): Full or part-time status; minimum 2.0 G.P.A. Co-requisite(s): BUS 293  Disney Co-Op Internship. Cannot be substituted for GEN 154  or (CNL 175 - no longer offered).
  
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    BUS 290 Cooperative Work Study

    Credits: (3)
    A course designed to prepare students to work after graduation. A learning contract containing specific educational objectives that relate to both the work experience and the field of study is developed between the student and a faculty co-op coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 180 hours of work, the maintenance of a work journal to record hours worked and duties performed, other work as required by the instructor and a final term paper. The student’s performance will be evaluated by the co-op faculty coordinator on the basis of meeting the objectives in the learning contract and satisfactory evaluation by the employer. A letter grade will be awarded. No experiential credit is given for previous work in the field. The work experience cannot be used to satisfy the requirements of any other course.
  
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    BUS 293 Disney Co-Operative Internship

    Credits: (9)
    The Disney Co-Operative Internship uses a directed working and learning experience to expand knowledge of successful organizational practices. This course is designed to meet a participant’s need for an integrated work-study internship program that provides transferable knowledge and skills to all participants. Students must register for one of the following courses at Onondaga and Disney: Corporate Analysis, Corporate Communication, Advanced Studies in Hospitality Management, Creativity and Innovation, Marketing You: Personal and Career Development Strategies, Human Resource Management, or Organizational Leadership. Students must have full- or part-time status with a minimum G.P.A. of 2.0. Students are responsible for all transportation costs to and from Florida. Students receive an hourly wage. They are housed on Disney property; housing costs are deducted from their weekly paycheck. Students must register for this course the same semester they participate in the Disney experience. This course cannot be taken concurrently with BUS 290 . Prerequisite(s): Full- or part-time status and minimum G.P.A. of 2.0 Co-requisite(s): BUS 178 , BUS 210 , BUS 218 , BUS 240 , BUS 247 , BUS 248 , or BUS 277 .

Computer Forensics

  
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    CFS 130 Foundations of the Internet

    Credits: (3)
    In this first course in the Web Technology sequence of courses, students will be introduced to Web development concepts and principles. Foundation topics include protocols, Linux commands, file management, remote access, and file transfer. Additionally, students will learn current industry-standard html/xhtml, cascading style sheets, image editing for web optimization, and the use of various editors. Students will be provided with a Web server account for their use. Additionally, Web accessibility will be discussed and incorporated.
  
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    CFS 140 Introduction to Computer Forensics

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the principles of information assurance and security. Topics include security investigation, analysis, implementation, maintenance, and design.
  
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    CFS 210 Terrorism and the Criminal Justice System

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces the student to the study of terrorism. It will focus on both domestic and foreign varieties of this unique form of organizational crime and its implications for the American criminal justice system. Prerequisite(s): ENG and ILS placements must be at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    CFS 232 Cybercrime

    Credits: (3)
    This course focuses on computer based crime and cybercrime issues facing the American criminal justice system. The course explores computer based crime investigations, the importance of preserving and correctly interpreting digital evidence, the application of cybercrime laws and regulations along with the identification of emerging issues facing the legal system (Courts). Students will also examine the future trends of cybercrime and government responses. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101 .

Chemistry

  
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    CHE 121 Introductory Chemistry

    Credits: (3)
    CHE 121 is designed as an introductory chemistry course for non-science majors and would also meet the needs of students who have little or no background in chemistry. CHE 121 is a course that would provide the basic chemistry background necessary to continue on to General Chemistry I (CHE 171 ). This course is not recommended for Health Science students and will not count toward the Math Science degree (MTS.AS). Students are strongly encouraged to co-register for MAT 114  if they intend to continue on to CHE 171 . Prerequisite: MAT 087  or MAT 088 , and placement into college level reading. An optional laboratory is offered for this course, CHE 121L , which may be taken concurrent with, or after completion of, CHE 121.
  
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    CHE 121L Introductory Chemistry Laboratory

    Credits: (1)
    Laboratory for CHE 121 . Illustrative experiments emphasizing the concepts, principles, and techniques presented in CHE 121 . Prerequisite: MAT 087  and placement in college level reading
  
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    CHE 121R Introductory Chemistry Recitation

    Credits: (1EQ)
    Optional recitation section for CHE 121 . Provides the opportunity for students to apply the theories, concepts and problem-solving techniques presented in CHE 121 . Prerequisite(s): MAT 087  and placement into college level reading Co-requisite(s): CHE 121 .
  
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    CHE 151 Basic Chemistry for the Health Sciences I

    Credits: (3)
    A study of chemistry at an introductory level, intended for students in the paramedical sciences (Nursing, Surgical Technology, or Physical Therapist Assistant). Topics include the nature of atoms; ionic and covalent bonding; nomenclature; chemical change and equilibrium; gas laws; properties of water and aqueous solutions; acids, bases and pH; and an introduction to organic and biochemical compounds. This course pre-supposes some knowledge of elementary algebra. Not open to Math-Science students. Prerequisites: College level reading and placement into MAT 088  or higher.
  
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    CHE 151L Basic Chemistry for the Health Sciences Laboratory I

    Credits: (1)
    Optional laboratory for CHE 151 ; illustrative experiments emphasizing the concepts, principles, and techniques presented in CHE 151 . Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): CHE 151  and placement into MAT 087  or higher. Three laboratory hours per week.
  
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    CHE 151R Basic Chemistry for the Health Sciences Recitation I

    Credits: (1EQ)
    Optional recitation section intended for students concurrently registered in CHE 151 . The recitation provides the opportunity for students to apply the theory, concepts and problem-solving techniques presented in CHE 151 .
  
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    CHE 171 General Chemistry I

    Credits: (3)
    A study of atomic structure, chemical bonding, stoichiometry, kinetic molecular theory and the states of matter, solutions, ionic reactions, oxidation and reduction, acid and base theories, thermochemistry, molecular geometry, gas laws, and intermolecular forces. Prerequisite(s): MAT 114  and placement in college level reading. Students are expected to have mastered high school (Regent’s) chemistry or successfully completed CHE 121 . An optional laboratory is offered for this course, CHE 171L , which may be taken concurrently with, or after completion of, CHE 171.
  
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    CHE 171L General Chemistry I Laboratory

    Credits: (1)
    Optional laboratory for CHE 171 . Illustrative experiments emphasizing the concepts, principles, and techniques presented in CHE 171 . Students are expected to have mastered high school (Regent’s) chemistry or successfully completed CHE 121 . Prerequisite(s): MAT 114 , placement in college level reading. Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): CHE 171 .
  
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    CHE 171R General Chemistry I Recitation

    Credits: (1EQ)
    Optional recitation section for CHE 171 . Provides the opportunity for students to apply theories, concepts and problem-solving techniques presented in CHE 171 . Prerequisite(s): MAT 114  and placement in college level reading
  
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    CHE 172 General Chemistry II

    Credits: (3)
    A study of solutions, colligative properties, kinetics, chemical equilibrium, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, and basic organic chemistry and biochemistry. Prerequisite(s): CHE 171 , MAT 143 . An optional laboratory is offered for this course, CHE 172L , which may be taken concurrently with, or after completion of, CHE 172.
  
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    CHE 172L General Chemistry II Laboratory

    Credits: (1)
    Optional laboratory for CHE 172 . Illustrative experiments emphasizing the concepts, principles, and techniques presented in CHE 172 . Prerequisite(s): CHE 171 , MAT 143 . An optional laboratory is offered for this course, CHE 172L, which may be taken concurrently with, or after completion of, CHE 172 .
  
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    CHE 172R General Chemistry Recitation II

    Credits: (1EQ)
    Optional recitation section for CHE 172 . Provides the opportunity for students to apply theories, concepts and problem-solving techniques presented in CHE 172 . Prerequisite(s): MAT 143   Co-requisite(s): CHE 172 
  
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    CHE 203 Quantitative Analysis

    Credits: (4)
    Topics covered include error and statistical treatment of data, chemical equilibrium, gravimetric analysis, various types of volumetric analysis, electrochemistry, spectrophotometry, and introduction to analytical separations. The laboratory portion of the course includes traditional and modern methods of gravimetric and volumetric analysis, and elementary instrumental methods. Prerequisite(s): CHE 171  and MAT 114  or higher. Three class hours and four laboratory hours.
  
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    CHE 205 Organic Chemistry I

    Credits: (4)
    An introduction to the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes and alkyl halides. Emphasis is placed on mechanisms of reactions and the relationship of structure to reactivity. Four class hours each week. Prerequisite(s): CHE 172  and CHE 172L  and placement into college level reading.
  
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    CHE 205L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory

    Credits: (1)
    Laboratory for CHE 205. An introduction to the chemistry of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes and alkyl halides. Laboratory work is concerned with experience in the necessary experimental techniques for synthesis and isolation and analysis of the above classes of compounds. Prerequisite(s): CHE 172 and CHE 172L, placement in college level reading. CHE 205 must be taken previously or concurrently with CHE 205L.
  
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    CHE 206 Organic Chemistry II

    Credits: (4)
    A continuation of CHE 205  with more emphasis on mechanisms, nomenclature and properties of conjugated dienes, arenes, alcohols, ethers, carboxylic acids, aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acid derivatives and amines, and the study of qualitative organic analyses. Prerequisite(s): CHE 205 . Four class hours each week.
  
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    CHE 206L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory

    Credits: (1)
    Laboratory for CHE 206 . An introduction to the chemistry of alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, aryl amines, carboxylic acids, and esters. Laboratory work is concerned with experience in the necessary synthesis, isolation, purification, and analysis of the above classes of compounds. Prerequisite(s): CHE 205  and CHE 205L 

Chinese

  
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    CHI 101 Elementary Chinese I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of Chinese. Students acquire basic grammar and lexical skills that will enable them to communicate in routine social or professional situations within an authentic cultural context. Topics may include, but are not limited to, biographical information, relationships, education, daily routines and activities, making plans, and dining out. Upon successful completion of CHI 101, students may enroll in CHI 102 . This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC.
  
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    CHI 102 Elementary Chinese II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a sequel to Elementary Chinese I. It builds upon the basic grammatical, linguistic, communicative and cultural concepts learned in CHI 101 . Students learn to communicate in the context of an increasing number of daily life topics. Topics may include, but are not limited to, food and dining, weather, transportation, urban and commercial contexts, clothing and other belongings, health, leisure activities and travel plans. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC. Prerequisite(s): CHI 101  or permission of instructor.

Cinema

  
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    CIN 203 Film and Literature

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the mutually informing relationship between literature and film. Students will engage in reading, discussion, and written analysis of literature as well as viewing, discussion, and written analysis of film. Particular attention will be paid to transmutation across media to develop a comparative analysis of the art forms that recognizes their distinct formal dimensions as well as the interconnections between their aesthetic, economic, historical, socio-political, cultural, and technological contexts. Prerequisite(s): ENG 104 .
  
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    CIN 204 Global Cinema

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines global cinema as an artistic, political, and cultural phenomenon. Students will engage in viewing, discussion, and written analysis of global films from a variety of historical, national, and socio-political contexts, both historically and comparatively, paying particular attention to the development of film language, aesthetics, and technology over time, as well as the formation of national or cultural film styles, genres, and idioms. Prerequisite(s): ENG 104 .
  
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    CIN 205 American Cinema

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the American cinema as an artistic, political, and cultural entity that has uniquely influenced film production and reception through its studio system, its development and employment of genres, and its creation of aesthetic and stylistic conventions. Students will engage in viewing, discussion, and written analysis of American film texts, focusing on how these texts relate to the cultural movements and intellectual history of American civilization. Possible contextual focuses for the course could include: American cinema and identity construction, external forces on American life, American landscapes and regions, American genres, or other emerging topics in the field. Prerequisite(s): ENG 104 .
  
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    CIN 210 The Short Narrative Film

    Credits: (3)
    From early “one-reelers” to current offerings on dedicated websites, international festivals, and film schools, this course studies the history, form, and purpose of classical and contemporary short films. Students will view, discuss, and write about the unique aspects of the short, narrative film, with its dazzling array of themes and styles. As these award-winning independent films often feature actors, writers, and directors prominent in commercial films and TV shows, the course provides an opportunity to examine the relationship between 5-25 minute short films and full-length films by the same writers or directors.
  
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    CIN 212 Horror and Fantasy Films

    Credits: (3)
    A study of the classic myths of horror, with an emphasis on the literary origins of horror tales, and a close study of such significant books as Dracula and Frankenstein, with interpretations of why such terrifying concepts have continuously proven popular the world over, and a study of the way in which Hollywood motion pictures have both extended and distorted the varied tales.

Computer Information Systems

  
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    CIS 100 Information and Computer Literacy

    Credits: (3)
    This course offers students an overview of the role of technology in society and provides an introduction to digital and information technologies, concepts, and terminologies. Discussions of the Community, Legal, and Ethical issues related to digital devices and the Internet are integral to the nature of this course. This course provides students with opportunities to develop research and critical thinking skills, and will introduce students to continuously evolving and emerging digital technologies and their effects on society. Students will demonstrate the skills needed to be an informed digital citizen, achieve academic and workplace success, and participate in an increasingly globalized environment. Students will use web applications, word-processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation, and other software, as applicable, to learn, search and organize their research, and then present and communicate their findings.
  
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    CIS 106 An Introduction to Digital Media

    Credits: (3)
    This introductory-level course provides a basic hands-on approach for the production and assessment of a team-based digital media project. Utilization of the components found in various software programs will allow students to select a digitally-based group project utilizing various aspects of audio, video and digital media. A culminating project will be distributed via DVD, the Internet/World Wide Web, or some other appropriate channel/medium. A basic knowledge of computers and some background in music and/or musical theory would be helpful but is not required.
  
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    CIS 125 Fundamentals of Computer Information Systems

    Credits: (3)
    This is the first course for CIS majors or any student interested in exploring the professional field of Computer Information Systems. The course covers the concepts of computing principles and advanced data use. Topics include software and hardware management tools and techniques, file management, presentation software, database applications and concepts, and current issues in computing and information systems having an impact on today’s society. The lessons will be presented using traditional classroom lectures and hands-on computer projects.
  
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    CIS 130 Foundations of the Internet

    Credits: (3)
    In this first course in the Web Technology sequence of courses, students will be introduced to Web development concepts and principles. Foundation topics include protocols, Linux commands, file management, remote access, and file transfer. Additionally, students will learn current industry-standard html/xhtml, cascading style sheets, image editing for web optimization, and the use of various editors. Students will be provided with a Web server account for their use. Additionally, Web accessibility will be discussed and incorporated.
  
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    CIS 151 Technology and Organizations

    Credits: (3)
    This is a course on the impact of technologies related to work and organizations. It addresses both the unintended and intended outcomes of technology. Students examine the changing nature of time demands, the relationship between the organization and its members, the “labor saving” device, quality of work life, computer misuse, repetitive strain injuries, and other topics.
  
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    CIS 170 Network Fundamentals

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of computer networks. It uses the OSI and TCP layered models to examine the protocols and services used in networking. Students will be introduced to structured IP addressing and Ethernet.
  
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    CIS 230 Web Site Design and Development

    Credits: (4)
    This course will expand upon CIS 130  and will focus on principles of design in the authorship of Web pages. As the focus shifts from basic Web page creation to designing full Web sites, so too will the tools shift from HTML editors to WYSIWYG editors. A topic of discussion will be the issue of accessibility. Further development topics include intermediate to advanced HTML code, intermediate graphics manipulation, JavaScript, Flash and other multimedia, and an introduction to dynamic content. Prerequisite(s): CIS 130 .
  
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    CIS 231 Advanced Web Servers

    Credits: (4)
    Students will learn advanced Web management techniques, with an emphasis on server-side issues. Students will add interactivity to their Web sites through the use of forms and server side scripting. A further exploration of dynamic content will be included. Additionally, students will work with server side databases, including stored procedures. Finally, students will configure and manage a Web server, including virtual hosting, troubleshooting and security. Prerequisite(s): CIS 125  or Permission of Instructor.
  
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    CIS 271 Internetworking I

    Credits: (4)
    This course expands upon Network Fundamentals advances into Routing and Switching. Students will explore the architecture, components, and operation of Cisco routers, and learn the principles of routing and the routing protocols RIP, EIGRP, and OSPF. They will learn the technologies and protocols needed to design and implement a converged switched network, including virtual LANs, VTP, inter-VLAN routing, and Spanning Tree Protocol. Prerequisite(s): CIS 170 .
  
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    CIS 272 Internetworking II

    Credits: (3)
    This is an advanced course in networking that explores WAN technologies and integrating network services. Students learn how to implement and configure data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of traffic, access control, and addressing services. A focus on detecting, troubleshooting, and correcting common network implementation issues will be covered to prepare students for the CCNA examination. Prerequisite(s): CIS 271 .
  
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    CIS 281 Computer Information Systems Internship

    Credits: (1)
    This course is designed to provide work experience directly related to the student’s area of study in Computer Information Systems. Internships are available throughout the local community. A learning contract containing specific educational objectives that relate both to the work experience and the field of study will be developed between the student and the Faculty Internship Coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 60 work-hours for 1 credit. Each student must maintain a Work/Research Journal to record hours worked and duties performed. A summary reflection presentation/paper/project will be prepared and delivered by the student at the completion of the Internship. The student’s performance will be evaluated by the Faculty Internship Coordinator based on accomplishment of the objectives in the learning contract and satisfactory evaluations by the employer/site supervisor. No experiential credit will be given for previous work or research experience. Prerequisite(s): minimum GPA of 3.0, sophomore standing, and approval of the Faculty Internship Coordinator.
  
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    CIS 282 Computer Information Systems Internship

    Credits: (2)
    This course is designed to provide work experience directly related to the student’s area of study in Computer Information Systems. Internships are available throughout the local community. A learning contract containing specific educational objectives that relate both to the work experience and the field of study will be developed between the student and the Faculty Internship Coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 120 work-hours for 2 credits. Each student must maintain a Work/Research Journal to record hours worked and duties performed. A summary reflection presentation/paper/project will be prepared and delivered by the student at the completion of the Internship. The student’s performance will be evaluated by the Faculty Internship Coordinator based on accomplishment of the objectives in the learning contract and satisfactory evaluations by the employer/site supervisor. No experiential credit will be given for previous work or research experience. Prerequisite(s): minimum GPA of 3.0, sophomore standing, and approval of the Faculty Internship Coordinator.
  
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    CIS 283 Computer Information Systems Internship

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to provide work experience directly related to the student’s area of study in Computer Information Systems. Internships are available throughout the local community. A learning contract containing specific educational objectives that relate both to the work experience and the field of study will be developed between the student and the Faculty Internship Coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 180 work-hours for 3 credits. Each student must maintain a Work/Research Journal to record hours worked and duties performed. A summary reflection presentation/paper/project will be prepared and delivered by the student at the completion of the Internship. The student’s performance will be evaluated by the Faculty Internship Coordinator based on accomplishment of the objectives in the learning contract and satisfactory evaluations by the employer/site supervisor. No experiential credit will be given for previous work or research experience. Prerequisite(s): minimum GPA of 3.0, sophomore standing, and approval of the Faculty Internship Coordinator.
  
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    CIS 286 Systems Analysis and Design

    Credits: (3)
    This course is the capstone course for Computer Information Systems majors, requiring students to integrate techniques and concepts learned from their other coursework. The course will focus on the phases of the Systems Development Life Cycle (SDLC), and the roles and responsibilities that a systems analyst performs throughout the SDLC process. Students will be expected to work in collaborative, self-directed teams to produce comprehensive projects, culminating in a thorough, concise study of a simulated environment that will be used to research and create a system design. Students will also be expected to present their projects in a professional manner, demonstrating the ability to deliver technical information to a non-technical audience. Prerequisite(s): CIS 125  or permission of instructor.
  
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    CIS 291 Information Technology Support I

    Credits: (4)
    This course will prepare students to work with users of computer software and hardware. Topics include basic hardware components, configurations, installations, troubleshooting, preventative maintenance, safety concerns, and customer service issues. Software issues such as installation and upgrading, BIOS configurations and settings, diagnostic tools and maintenance will also be covered. This detailed hands-on approach will prepare students to take the A+ certification examination administered by the Computer Technology Association (CompTIA). There will be no experiential credit granted for this course. Students will receive 3 hours of instruction and 1 lab hour per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 125  or permission of instructor.
  
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    CIS 292 Information Technology Support II

    Credits: (4)
    A continuation of CIS 291 , this capstone course will prepare the student for working with, and training users in the use of modern software and hardware. Students will learn hardware and software maintenance techniques, including advanced troubleshooting, network and desktop security, and software maintenance. In addition, students spend 30 hours during the semester as an unpaid intern at a local business or nonprofit organization troubleshooting hardware and software problems, doing technical research, and learning about the organization they’re working at. There will be both individual and team assignments. There will be no experiential credit granted for this course. Students will receive 2 hours of instruction, and perform 4 hours of internship practicum per week. Prerequisite(s): CIS 291  and (CIS 170  or CIS 271 ).

Computer Engineering Technology

  
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    CMT 101 Introduction to Computers and Applications

    Credits: (4)
    This course is an introduction to basic concepts underlying the computer and its applications in technology and science fields. The focus of the course is on studying the computer for acquiring and presenting information, using spreadsheets to solve problems, collecting and storing data, and word processing. Topics include: hardware and software computer concepts, an introduction to internet in acquiring and sharing information (WWW, User list, and Personal Message Centers), introduction to spread sheet applications in solving problems and charting, use of text editors to write documents (Word Processing), an introduction to technical presentations, and use of application programs for organizing data, and drawing charts and schematics. Students who have completed CIS 100  or (CMT 110 - no longer offered) may not take this course for credit. Prerequisite(s): MAT 079  Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): MAT 087 /MAT 088  or permission of instructor.
 

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