Apr 26, 2018  
College Catalog 2018-2019 
    
College Catalog 2018-2019

Course Descriptions


 

Electrical Technology

  
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    ELT 289 Cooperative Education

    Credits: (3)
    Topics are selected to respond to the particular needs of students and the special preparation needed for career opportunities as they exist at the time of the course offering. A learning contract, containing specific educational objectives related to work experience and the student’s field of study, is developed by the student, the faculty cooperative education coordinator, and (when possible) the supervisor the cooperative education student will report to. Course requirements include a minimum of 180 hours of work in the student’s field of study, maintenance of a log (usually daily) of hours worked and duties performed, and a work-related final project. Prerequisite(s): Combined approval by the course instructor (or Department Chair) and Career Services.

Electronic Media Communications

  
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    EMC 101 Mass Media Communications: An Introduction

    Credits: (3)
    The course presents an overview of mass media as public communication and traces the histories and technological developments of print, film, radio, television, the Internet and emerging technologies. Topics covered include journalism, media management and business practices, advertising and commerce, social media, ethics, laws and regulations, and global media, with special emphasis on the role of mass media in culture and society. No prerequisites; open elective. This course fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) elective at OCC.
  
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    EMC 144 Audio/Video Production: An Introduction

    Credits: (4)
    This course is designed to give the student a basic overview of audio and video production. Terminology and application are introduced through lecture and usage. The student will be introduced to the skills necessary to operate audio and video equipment in studio settings and begin to develop visual and aural literacy. This course is a requirement for all other Electronic Media Communications production courses. Prerequisite(s): Electronic Media Communications majors or permission of instructor. Five lecture/production hours per week.
  
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    EMC 155 Digital Audio Production

    Credits: (3)
    This course is intended to give the student a practical and theoretical approach to digital audio production. Emphasis is placed on script creation, voice recording, audio editing, multi-track mixing, and audio processing for use in radio and video projects. Prerequisite(s): EMC 144 ; Electronic Media Communications majors only.
  
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    EMC 159 Television Studio Production

    Credits: (4)
    This course stresses the importance of effective teamwork and problem-solving skills necessary for successful television studio production. Television studio production terminology, techniques, and disciplines are explained, demonstrated, and applied. This course builds on basic production techniques and skills developed in EMC 144  Introduction to Audio/Video Production. Emphasis is placed on creating and producing multi-camera television programs. Prerequisite(s): EMC 144 ; Electronic Media Communications majors only. Five lecture/production hours per week.
  
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    EMC 160 Radio Station: An Introduction

    Credits: (3)
    This radio course is designed to introduce the student to the terminology, technology, concepts, and structure of radio broadcast stations. Topics covered will include FCC rules and regulations, station organization, sales, ratings, promotions, control room operations, departmental interrelationships, technological applications and industry trends. Prerequisite(s): EMC 144  or permission of instructor. EMC majors only.
  
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    EMC 169 Video Field Production I

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to the creative aspects and fundamental technical requirements of single-camera video field production. Topics covered include the mechanics of field camera operation, location lighting and sound recording, and basic digital video editing. Aesthetic principles such as picture composition, the relationship of sound to image, continuity and visual narrative are discussed and applied. Preproduction planning and legal and copyright concerns are covered as well. Prerequisite(s): EMC 144 . EMC majors only or permission of instructor.
  
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    EMC 190 Internship I

    Credits: (3)
    The student, working with the faculty internship coordinator, will develop a learning contract containing specific educational objectives as they relate to that work experience and the student’s field of study. Course requirements include a minimum of 120 hours of on-location work, maintenance of a weekly log which includes hours worked and duties performed, and a final paper outlining the student’s experiences. Prerequisite(s): Sophomore-level EMC majors only. Student must have a GPA of 2.75 or higher and obtain the recommendation of an EMC faculty member.
  
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    EMC 249 Electronic News Gathering: An Introduction

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to the concepts and practices of professional news gathering for electronic media. The role of news in media is explained, with emphasis on identifying basic forms of news delivery. Students will practice the techniques of determining a story’s newsworthiness, researching, copy writing, interviewing, producing, writing to the image and editing news stories. Additional emphasis will be placed upon ethics and professionalism in electronic news. Prerequisite(s): EMC 169 ; EMC majors only.
  
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    EMC 251 Sportscasting I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to present an in-depth study of the world of sports communications concentrating specifically on fall winter sports. Students will explore the techniques used in statistical research, production, and analysis of sporting events and gain reporting and producing experience. Prerequisite(s): EMC 144 , EMC 159 ; EMC majors only or permission of instructor.
  
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    EMC 252 Sportscasting II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a continuation of an in-depth study of the world of Sports Communications, concentrating specifically on winter spring sports. EMC students will become familiar with the techniques used to research, report and produce sporting events. Students will receive in-depth and hands-on experience in reporting and producing sporting events and television sports anchoring. Prerequisite(s): EMC 144 , EMC 159 ; EMC majors only or permission of instructor.
  
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    EMC 259 Video Field Production II

    Credits: (4)
    This course is designed to enable students to become proficient in the technical and creative aspects of advanced video field production and editing. Students analyze the concepts and techniques of visual storytelling, pacing, and sound design for video and apply them to their own short-form projects. Field camera, lighting, planning for post-production and media management are emphasized. Prerequisite(s): EMC 169 . EMC major or permission of instructor. Three lecture/two production lab hours per week.
  
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    EMC 260 Radio Station Operations

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides the basic principles of contemporary radio station programming, focusing on formatting concepts and strategies, marketing, promotion, and practical applications. Emphasis will be placed on the student’s application of programming strategies through the use of OCC Internet Radio. Prerequisite(s): EMC 160 .
  
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    EMC 265 Sound Design and Production for Digital Media

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the technical and creative aspects of looped-based audio production and how it is used in different types of digital media productions. Students will analyze and create audio to be used in media projects ranging from radio programming, television/video programming, and DVDs. Prerequisite(s): EMC 155 . EMC majors or permission of instructor.
  
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    EMC 269 Television News Production

    Credits: (4)
    This course focuses on the skills necessary to create content and produce a weekly television production. Methods of news delivery are analyzed. Students conduct research and interviews, and produce, report and write copy for television news. Emphasis is also placed on ethics, professionalism and legal considerations. Prerequisite(s): EMC 249  or permission of instructor; EMC Majors only. Five lecture/production hours.
  
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    EMC 275 Producing for Radio

    Credits: (4)
    This course stresses the importance of effective teamwork and problem-solving skill necessary for successful radio production and is a culmination of audio theory and practical skills learned by students in previous radio courses. Students will produce original programming in the areas of news and public affairs, sports, college/community interest, and/or popular culture. Emphasis will be placed on the student’s ability to provide informational and entertainment programming for the college Internet radio station. Three lecture/two production lab hours per week. Prerequisite(s): EMC 260  and ENG 157 /COM 157 .
  
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    EMC 286 DVD Authoring

    Credits: (4)
    This course provides a hands-on approach to the conceptualization, design, production, and assessment of video projects completed on DVD. The course will focus on strategic planning (including scripting and flow charts), creation of video and audio content, proper encoding of media, file management, creation of interactive menus, proper linking of all media assets within the DVD, and outputting projects to a DVD disc. Topics of discussion will include the history, characteristics, various types, and user interactivity of the DVD format, as well as various types of digital media files and managing those files on a network. Prerequisite(s): EMC 259 , and EMC majors only or permission of instructor. Three lecture/two production lab hours per week.
  
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    EMC 289 Television Producing and Directing

    Credits: (4)
    This course is designed to build upon and improve the student’s studio production skills, to further an understanding of the multi-source production process and to become proficient in directing and producing a studio production. Emphasis is placed on the correct use of television directing terminology. The aesthetic principles of producing, sound, visualization, and continuity are identified and applied. Five lecture/production hours per week. Prerequisite(s): EMC 159 ; EMC majors only.
  
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    EMC 290 Internship II

    Credits: (3)
    The student, working with the faculty internship coordinator, will develop a learning contract containing specific educational objectives as they relate to that work experience and the student’s field of study. Course requirements include a minimum of 120 hours of on-location work, maintenance of a weekly log, which includes hours worked and duties performed, and a final paper outlining the student’s experiences. This learning contract must be different than the EMC 190  contract. Prerequisite(s): EMC 190 ; sophomore-level EMC majors only. Student must have a GPA of 2.75 or higher and obtain the recommendation of an EMC faculty member.

Emergency Management

  
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    EMG 150 Principles of Emergency Management

    Credits: (3)
    This course is intended to provide information that will enable persons just entering the profession or expanding their roles to have the ability to work with emergency management issues. The course provides an overview of the characteristics, functions, and resources of an integrated system and how various emergency management services work together in an integration of resources and capabilities. Emphasis will be placed on how this system is applied to all hazards for all government levels, across the four phases and all functions of emergency management.
  
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    EMG 152 Public Safety Critical Incident Management

    Credits: (1)
    Public Safety Critical Incident Management provides students with information relevant to public safety forces’ (fire, police, and emergency medical services) roles and responsibilities when responding to an emergency. Additionally, the course provides information dealing with support service agencies and the concerns and roles of private business and local government in supporting public safety forces in emergency situations. The course provides information to encourage cooperation of all groups and agencies at the scene of an emergency, with a key component focusing on the goals and critical tasks of each public safety agency operating at a given scene.
  
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    EMG 155 Introduction to Public Safety Response

    Credits: (3)
    This course will provide the student with a base-line understanding of the principles of responding to many types of emergencies. Course topics include: emergency response activities from police, fire, EMS, and business industry perspectives, terrorism related incidents, and their specific response activities. Interpretation and analysis of case studies will allow the student to understand the needs of each discipline and the importance of working together to manage emergencies. This course will include the basics of incident command training, which correlates with the National Incident Management System (NIMS).
  
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    EMG 162 Resource and Donation Management

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to provide Resource Management Coordinators with the knowledge and skills they need to perform resource management functions within the overall framework of the emergency operations center (EOC). This performance-based course is intended to introduce local officials (i.e., representatives of local governments and leaders of local voluntary organizations) to the concept of donations management and their roles and responsibilities in the donations management process.
  
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    EMG 165 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides a comprehensive overview, covering all facets of hazardous waste management and emergency response. Topics include practical exercises and training which may be applied to business, industry, construction and institutions, including Federal and State rules and regulations, handling procedures and proper operation of a designated waste facility, storage, labeling, manifesting, shipment, employee training, proper use of safety equipment, emergency response procedures (spills response and clean up), cost effective waste reduction, and environmental reporting procedures. This course is offered as a one week 40-hour course over the winter intersession and will provide 40-Hour Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) certification as specified in OSHA 29CFR 1910.120.
  
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    EMG 170 Public Information Officer Basic Course

    Credits: (3)
    The Public Information Officer Basic Course provides students with the skills needed to perform public information duties as they relate to emergency management. The course focuses on the definition of the job of the public information officer. The course assists participants with building the skills needed for this position, such as oral and written communication, understanding and working with the media, and the basic tools and techniques PIOs need to do the job. Prerequisite(s): EMG major or permission of instructor.
  
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    EMG 176 Disasters in Film and Media

    Credits: (3)
    Examination of the popular culture pertaining to natural and technological disasters that result from portrayals of catastrophic events in film by the media. Discussion of what can be done to alter myths about human behavior in mass emergency situations.
  
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    EMG 178 Principles of Emergency Management

    Credits: (3)
    Planning is an essential function of an effective emergency management program and serves as a tool for emergency professionals in improving disaster management and public safety policies. The Emergency Response Planning course provides emergency management and public safety personnel with the knowledge, skills, and ability to develop or enhance their Comprehensive Emergency Management plans. The course will highlight the importance of building an integrated system for emergency planning that uses multi-agency teams to address mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery.
  
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    EMG 180 Emergency Management Leadership

    Credits: (3)
    The Emergency Management Leadership course is designed to provide students with the skills necessary to lead and influence others in the demanding setting of emergency management by increasing their range of skills in a variety of interpersonal areas. Students are taught to clearly identify problems and their root causes in order to be able to determine the appropriate type of decision-making style. Using a suggested process of problem-solving, participants will be able to apply creative solutions to both emergency and non-emergency situations, in an emergency management setting. These skills are then applied to the important issue of managing and developing volunteer resources. Students will learn the necessary skills to make appropriate volunteer assignments, structure programs to maintain or increase the skill levels of volunteers, and motivate volunteers to both maintain readiness and operate effectively during emergency situations. Students may not receive credit for both this course and PSY 211 (no longer offered).
  
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    EMG 182 Basic Incident Command System

    Credits: (1)
    The Basic Incident Command System course is designed to increase the participants’ knowledge and understanding of the Incident Command System. Utilizing both lectures and small group activities, participants will acquire the ability to organize and manage an incident through implementing the ICS. The material covered during the course includes an introduction to the principles and features of ICS, organizational overview, incident facilities, incident resources, and common responsibilities of key ICS positions.
  
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    EMG 184 Emergency Response to Terrorism

    Credits: (1)
    The Public Safety Emergency Response to Terrorism course provides the knowledge and skills needed by public safety forces that respond to terrorist acts. The course provides those public safety and related support personnel the information to understand terrorism, its root causes, and motivations. The course also provides methods to enable students to recognize circumstances indicating a potential terrorist attack, and to protect themselves from a variety of potential dangers.
  
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    EMG 252 Disaster Response and Recovery

    Credits: (3)
    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the basic concepts and operations applicable in a disaster situation (particularly for major disasters) and enhance understanding of what the proper roles and responsibilities of various local and state emergency management officials are, why they matter, and how these roles and responsibilities relate to those carried out by the federal government. To foster multi-level partnership, the course emphasizes the problem-solving aspects of disaster operations as well as associated coordination requirements. This course will also discuss the use of the National Response Plan, Emergency Management’s place in the National Preparedness Goal, and current trends in disaster mitigation efforts. Prerequisite(s): EMG 150  or permission of instructor.
  
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    EMG 262 Intermediate Incident Command

    Credits: (1.50000)
    The Intermediate Incident Command System course is designed to increase the participants’ knowledge and understanding of the Incident Command System. Utilizing both lectures and small group activities, participants will acquire the ability to organize and manage staffing. The material covered during the course includes organization and staffing, organizing for incidents and events, incident resource management, air operations, and incident and event planning.
  
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    EMG 278 Emergency Operations Center Management

    Credits: (1.50000)
    The EOC Management course provides students with the knowledge and skills they need to design, initiate, build, and operate an Emergency Operations Center. The curriculum is designed using a performance-based approach, which emphasizes learning activities that are easily transferable to the job.
  
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    EMG 280 Emergency Exercise Program Management

    Credits: (3)
    The Emergency Exercise Program Management course is intended to provide participants with the knowledge and skills to develop and conduct disaster exercises that will test a community’s emergency operations plan and operational response capability.
  
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    EMG 282 Advanced Incident Command System

    Credits: (1.50000)
    The Advanced Incident Command System course is designed to increase the participants’ knowledge and understanding of the inherent flexibility of the Incident Command System to manage major or complex incidents. Utilizing both lectures and small group activities, participants will require the ability to organize and manage major or complex incidents. The material covered during the course includes command and general staff duties and responsibilities, unified command, major incident management and area command structures. Prerequisite(s): EMG 262 .
  
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    EMG 283 Practical Applications of Incident Management

    Credits: (3)
    The complexity of incident management is exacerbated when incidents deal with protecting lives and property. Large incidents typically managed by Emergency Managers require not only the didactic aspect of incident management education, but require the ability to use many principles taught in most emergency management courses. The purpose of this course is to allow a student to demonstrate an understanding of Emergency Operations plans and to apply the National Incident Management System principles and practices to a large, complex incident. Students will be required to research resource needs and the financial implications of decisions while using the Incident Command System.
  
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    EMG 284 Terrorism Response Planning for Communities and Schools

    Credits: (3)
    This course will help emergency planners, first responders, and others at all levels to review their preparedness efforts and response capabilities to a terrorist incident. It will also assist participants in the ongoing re-evaluations of threats, their current emergency operations plan and the implications of a terrorist incident on continuity of critical services and long-term recovery. The course also provides participants with the basic information and tools needed to develop effective plans for the wide array of potential emergencies that schools may face. Participants completing the course will be able to explain the importance of effective planning to others and to lead individuals in their school and community through the process of developing an effective multi-hazard program. Students cannot receive credit for both this course and EMG 160 (no longer offered).
  
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    EMG 285 Emergency Management Internship

    Credits: (3)
    This practical experience in the business or government community will allow Emergency Management students to put various skills and knowledge they have gained through coursework to use. Students may find themselves creating hazard analysis, updating comprehensive emergency management or operation plans, or observing incident managers at work, as well as other Emergency Management operations recommended by the supporting agencies.
  
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    EMG 286 Incident Action Planning for Rapidly Expanding Disasters

    Credits: (1.50000)
    The complexity of incident management is exacerbated when incidents deal with protecting lives and property. Large incidents typically managed by Emergency Managers require not only the didactic aspect of incident management education, but require the ability to use many principles taught in most emergency management courses. This is a companion course to EMG 278  which will allow a student to demonstrate an understanding of Emergency Operations and to apply the National Incident Management System (NIMS) to a large, complex expanding disaster. Students will be required to research Resource needs and understand the Financial impact of decisions needed to mitigate the emergency while using the Incident Command System.

Emergency Medical Services

  
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    EMS 122 Emergency Medical Technician - Original

    Credits: (9)
    This is a refresher course for EMS certified First Responders seeking recertification.

English

  
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    ENG 099 Basic Composition

    Credits: (3EQ)
    This is a developmental writing course for students who need more individualized instruction and intensive practice in composing and editing short expository prose than is provided in ENG 103 . This course does not satisfy Freshman English credit requirements. (Additional tutoring in the Writing Skills Center may be required.) This foundational course provides 3 equivalent credit hours toward a full-time load and is based on 3 equivalent credit hours; it carries 0 credit hours of academic credit. Prerequisite(s): Onondaga Community College placement test. Students who have taken the Level of English Proficiency (LOEP) as part of their placement examination may not register for ENG 099. They must register for ESL 115 , ESL 116 , or ENG 103 , as specified on their placement test summary.
  
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    ENG 103 Freshman Composition and Literature I

    Credits: (3)
    Emphasizing the recursive nature of writing and the process of revision, this course teaches students the skills and processes necessary for writing and revising college-level academic prose. Various aspects of writing, including invention/pre-writing, composing, revision, and editing/proofreading will be taught. Critical readings of various nonfiction texts may be used to develop understanding of rhetorical conventions and genres. Composing in and for electronic environments, as well as their conventions, will also be taught. Prerequisite(s): Onondaga Community College placement test and/or satisfactory completion of ENG 099  or ESL 116 .
  
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    ENG 104 Freshman Composition and Literature II

    Credits: (3)
    Teaches students to comprehend, respond to and use the ideas of others in their own writing. Skills such as analytic and critical reading and writing, summarizing, and paraphrasing are developed through the study of literature. Term paper form will also be taught. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103 .
  
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    ENG 121 News Literacy

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a survey of the ongoing changes in mass media with a focus on news literacy. Students will be introduced to the skills required to make critical evaluations of news and information sources across the spectrum of traditional and new media, assessing the content for such factors as diversity, accuracy, and bias. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 121 and COM 121 .
  
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    ENG 122 Introduction to Journalism

    Credits: (3)
    This course will be an overview of journalism and its historical, ethical, and professional base, including a survey of the background and importance of journalism in society, its role in democracy, key stories that shaped history, standard-bearers across news platforms, and the principles and responsibilities essential for fair and credible news reporting. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level.
  
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    ENG 123 Student Media Reporting

    Credits: (1)
    This course provides academic credit to students who contribute to student-run college media. Submissions can range from small pieces, such as calendar items and captions, to longer pieces, such as news stories, features, and reviews, for those with more interest and experience in news writing. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 123 and COM 123 . Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level.
  
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    ENG 157 Electronic Media Writing

    Credits: (3)
    This course helps students to master the diverse writing styles and formats used in writing for broadcast on radio, television and cable. These include public service announcements (PSAs), station IDs, promotional announcements, script formats, commercials, news copy, and program materials. Emphasis is on developing broadcast copy style, distinguishing words directed toward the ear and the eye. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 157 and COM 157 . Prerequisite(s): ENG 103 .
  
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    ENG 203 World Literature I

    Credits: (3)
    The course sequence (ENG 203- ENG 204 ) chronologically surveys major works of world literature with emphasis on Western literature and its relationship to the cultural trends of the period. A wide and varied range of readings is available to the student. The survey should lead to an awareness of the objectives and forms of literary art and to a knowledge of Western culture as great writers have mirrored it. Course covers the period from the Ancients through the Renaissance. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 204 World Literature II

    Credits: (3)
    The course sequence (ENG 203 - ENG 204) chronologically surveys major works of world literature with emphasis on Western literature and its relationship to the cultural trends of the period. A wide and varied range of readings is available to the student. The survey should lead to an awareness of the objectives and forms of literary art and to a knowledge of Western culture as great writers have mirrored it. Course covers the period from the Enlightenment to the present. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 205 Creative Writing-Nonfiction

    Credits: (3)
    This course will allow students to explore, write, and revise original non-fiction. Topics covered will include autobiographical and biographical writing, personal essays, memoirs, literary journalism, nature and/or science writing, historical writing, magazine writing, and reviews. Students will consider and use structure, characterization, unity and rhythm, and voice and tone, along with other literary devices, in their own writing. They may also be required to attend readings of non-fiction outside of scheduled class times. Prerequisite(s): ENG 104  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENG 206 Creative Writing-Poetry

    Credits: (3)
    Students will write and revise original poetry, considering language, imagery, rhythm, structure, point of view, story, theme, and other poetic elements. Students will study the styles and techniques of classic and contemporary poets. They may also be required to attend poetry readings in the area. This course does not fulfill a Humanities’ literature requirement. Prerequisite(s): ENG 104  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENG 207 Creative Writing-Fiction

    Credits: (3)
    Students will write and revise original fiction, both segments and complete stories, using language, dialogue, character development, action, setting, and plot in the service of a theme or message. Students will read and view the styles and techniques of classic and contemporary writers of fiction. They may also be required to attend readings of fiction in the area. This course does not fulfill a Humanities’ literature requirement. Prerequisite(s): ENG 104  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENG 208 Writing Scripts

    Credits: (3)
    Students will write and revise original, narrative scripts for the stage or screen, using dialogue, character development, action, setting, and plot in the service of a theme or message. Students will read and view the styles and techniques of classic and contemporary scriptwriters or playwrights. They may also be required to attend professional film, theatre, and TV productions in the area. Instructor will specify if the course focuses on scripts for the TV and film screen or for the theatre. This course does not fulfill a Humanities’ literature requirement. Prerequisite(s): ENG 104  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENG 209 Dramatic Literature I

    Credits: (3)
    A study of the early development of dramatic literature and its social relationships. First semester covers major contributions from Aeschylus to Ibsen. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 210 Dramatic Literature II

    Credits: (3)
    A study of modern drama from Ibsen to the present. Either semester may be taken independently. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 211 Intermediate Composition

    Credits: (3)
    This course explores the origins and development of the essay form in an academic context through the study of various historical and contemporary essays and asks students to apply this knowledge and experience to their own writing. Students will practice reading and writing different kinds of essays, explore the limits of the essay form, and practice and develop research skills. Additionally, students will become familiar with composing and revising techniques through a series of writing workshops. Students have the opportunity to leave the class as better and more versatile writers. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 213 Children’s Literature

    Credits: (3)
    Examines literature for children from the preschool level through the middle school level. Topics covered include history and development, research skills, criticism, major authors, and major forms: poetry, picture books, fairytales (folktales), fantasy, problem novels, multicultural, fiction and nonfiction. Emphasis is on the teaching of the knowledge and critical skills needed to locate, comprehend, analyze, evaluate, and present the literature. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 215 Mythology

    Credits: (3)
    The first concern of the course is the survey of Greek and Roman mythologies: their origin, development, interpretation, and use by both classical and modern writers. In addition, some attention is given to Norse and Celtic mythologies, their relationships to classical mythology and use in British literature. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 217 Science Fiction

    Credits: (3)
    An examination of Science Fiction through its major movements: Classic (pre-1930), Golden Age (1930- 1959), New Wave (1960-1974), and Contemporary (1975-present). Includes the study of themes within the genre. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 221 English Literature I

    Credits: (3)
    A critical and historical survey of English literature from the Romantic Age to the present. Although the literature is presented historically, the central emphasis of the course is on the works themselves. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 222 English Literature II

    Credits: (3)
    A critical and historical survey of English literature from the Romantic Age to the present. Although the literature is presented historically, the central emphasis of the course is on the works themselves. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 223 American Literature I

    Credits: (3)
    A critical study of major American writers of the 19th Century. The literary works are viewed in their relationship to the cultural movements and intellectual history of American civilization. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 224 American Literature II

    Credits: (3)
    A study of major American writers of the 20th Century. The literary works are viewed in their relationship to the cultural movements and intellectual history of American civilization. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 225 African American Literature I

    Credits: (3)
    A reading, writing, and discussion course that studies literature written by African American authors. Students read poetry, novels, short stories, plays, sermons, and folktales in order to develop their critical appreciation of literature, as well as understand the unique condition of people of African descent living in America. The first semester surveys literature written by and about African Americans from the 1750’s to the 1950’s. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 226 Literature of the Black American II

    Credits: (3)
    A reading, writing, and discussion course which studies works by modern Black American authors of the 1960’s to the present. Though the main focus of the course is on understanding literature in general, the themes of the works emphasize the special condition of Black people in America. Either semester may be taken independently. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 227 Writing for Emerging Technologies

    Credits: (3)
    Fast-paced and widespread developments in technology have changed the way people distribute, access, and understand information. With the Internet serving both as a medium for text and images, and a delivery system for other kinds of digital content, competitive employees in the marketplace must be able to provide clear and effective pieces of web-based communication and other kinds of documents. This course will discuss the issues surrounding the new technology. Topics covered in the course include First Amendment law and the Internet, “repurposing” stories across platforms, and clear writing techniques. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103 .
  
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    ENG 229 The Novel

    Credits: (3)
    A focused study of the novel examining its development, characteristics, and themes. Students will read, discuss, and write about the work of various novelists within their social, ideological, and/or historical contexts. The class will emphasize the analysis of the novel as a genre as well as its technical and formal aspects. Novels chosen for this course represent a variety of perspectives, time periods, cultures, and/or nationalities. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 230 Women’s Literature

    Credits: (3)
    A reading, discussion, and writing course that covers several time periods and genres to focus on the unique problems and accomplishments of women writers. Analyses of literary works will focus on gender and the cultural climate in which the studied writers worked. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 231 The Bible As Literature

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the Hebrew Bible (Old Testament) and Christian Bible (New Testament) as literary texts. It will include an examination of literary forms and genres in the Bible, the influence of non-biblical literary sources and analogues, the relationship between history and the Bible, the settings and cultures in which biblical events took place, the process by which the Bible was written and edited, and the influence of the Bible on Western literature. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 233 Shakespeare

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the study of Shakespeare’s dramatic and poetic corpus, this course will present students with the opportunity to interpret and analyze his work. A variety of interpretive lenses will be used to better understand Shakespeare’s work in both his time and our own. Readings will include representative sonnets and the three major genres of the drama. Film adaptations may be used to supplement the reading material. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 239 American Folklore

    Credits: (3)
    This course investigates types of folklore found in the United States, including aspects such as definition, classification, origin, variation, and function in contemporary culture. It explores how traditions (oral, customary, and material folklore) develop within any group of people who share a common interest, experience or background, whether it be race, ethnicity, region, occupation, class, family, age, gender, sexual orientation, (dis)ability, special interest, etc. Through readings, films, and discussion focused on examples of diverse groups, students will learn how the lore of a group both expresses and shapes the experience, concerns, and values of the group. Students will collect, classify, analyze, and share the traditions of their own groups as well. Learning to recognize the dynamics of folklore within their own groups, students will gain the skills necessary to understand and respect the traditions of groups other than their own. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 241 American Autobiography As Literature

    Credits: (3)
    A survey of American autobiographies during the nation’s history. The class will examine the cultural issues raised by each autobiographer’s quest for identity, and investigate the ways autobiographers shape their lives in words.
  
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    ENG 245 New Immigrant Literature

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines literature reflecting the American experience of immigrants and expressing their search for roots and cultural identity, both in the U.S. and in journeys back to their homelands. The class will explore cultural issues raised in fiction, poetry, drama, and memoirs of writers from a number of countries. Discussion and writing assignments will focus on both analyzing the literature and on examining the students’ experiences. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 250 Voices of Diversity

    Credits: (3)
    Studies of the pride and prejudice encountered by minority groups in American culture, as expressed in literature and film. At least three of the following “voices”, their songs and their outcries, will be heard each semester: the gay and lesbian voice; the Asian-American voice; the Hispanic voice; the Jewish voice; the new immigrant voice; the Native American voice; the voices of the homeless, the drugged, the disenfranchised, and other minority voices. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .
  
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    ENG 251 News Writing

    Credits: (3)
    An introductory course in the basics of news reporting and writing, focusing on gathering information, story and sentence structure, accuracy, Associated Press style, and meeting deadlines. Students will write a variety of publication-ready news stories, including college-related events and student public interest stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 251 and COM 251 . Prerequisite(s): ENG 103 .
  
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    ENG 252 Feature Writing and Literary Journalism

    Credits: (3)
    Students will analyze and evaluate feature stories and writing in the genre of literary journalism. Drawing on techniques from the New Journalism, current models of literary journalism, and sound reporting practices, students will write a variety of publication-ready features, including profiles, critiques, and human interest stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 252 and COM 252 . Prerequisite(s): ENG 103 .
  
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    ENG 253 Student Publication Editing

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides academic credit to students who serve in editorial roles for student-run college media. Tasks can include assignment and placement of stories, feedback to student reporters, and copyediting, proofreading, and editing of final stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 253 and COM 253 . Prerequisite(s): ENG 123 /COM 123  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ENG 259 Professional and Technical Writing

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides training in the preparation of professional documents. Attention is paid to the development of the student’s ability to design coherent documents, to organize ideas, and to understand forms, stylistic conventions, and standard language of the field. The course may be tailored to meet the needs of specific cohorts. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103 .
  
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    ENG 282 Introduction to Critical Theory

    Credits: (3)
    The goal of this course is to introduce students to several schools of critical theory widely used in literary analysis, including deconstruction, post-colonialism, feminism, Marxism, semiotics, and psychoanalysis. By the end of this course, students will be familiar with the major arguments and questions of the schools studied. This coverage will include where ideas intersect across schools, key debates at the heart of critical analysis, and practical applications. Most usefully, students will complete the course by performing analytical tasks in at least two critical schools. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  and ENG 104 .

Engineering Science

  
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    ENS 150 Introduction to Engineering

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the engineering discipline/profession. Topics covered will include the following: an introduction to the various types of engineering majors and professions, engineering design and analysis methods, elementary engineering statistics and data analysis, computer literacy, working in a team setting, oral and written communications, use of practical engineering tools, and engineering ethics. Coverage of computer literacy may include word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software (MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint), graphical applications software (CAD or solid modeling), scientific programming, and mathematical or laboratory software applications.
  
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    ENS 201 Digital Logic Design

    Credits: (4)
    An introduction to digital (computer) integrated circuits, emphasizing the concepts that are basic to any digital system: number systems, small-scale and mid-scale gates, programmable logic devices, sequential logic, combinational networks, Boolean algebra, truth tables, Karnaugh maps, state machine design, timing diagrams, and digital arithmetic. Co-requisite(s): MAT 114  or equivalent Three class hours and a three-hour lab.
  
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    ENS 207 Engineering Mechanics I: Statics

    Credits: (3)
    Basic concepts, vector algebra, forces and moments about a point and a line. Free Body diagrams, equilibrium conditions in two and three dimensions. Plane trusses, frames and machines. Forces in beams and cables. Application of friction in machines. Centroids and moments of inertia of lines, areas, and volumes. Principal axes and principal moments of inertia, Mohr’s circle. Three lecture hours plus recitation. Prerequisite(s): PHY 105  and MAT 162 .
  
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    ENS 207R Engineering Mechanics I: Statics Recitation

    Credits: (1EQ)
    This is an optional recitation for students taking ENS 207 . It is structured as small group activities and provides students an opportunity to develop problem-solving skills in the subject of Statics. Co-requisite(s): ENS 207 
  
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    ENS 208 Engineering Mechanics II: Dynamics

    Credits: (3)
    Kinematics and kinetics of particles. Energy and momentum methods. Central force and space dynamics, relative motion, impact. Kinetics of systems of particles. Plane kinematics and kinetics of rigid bodies. Energy and momentum methods. Three-dimensional dynamics of rigid bodies. Prerequisite(s): ENS 207  and MAT 263 . Three lecture hours plus recitation.
  
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    ENS 208R Engineering Mechanics II: Dynamics Recitation

    Credits: (1EQ)
    This is an optional recitation for students taking ENS 208  . It is structured as small group activities and provides students an opportunity to develop problem-solving skills in the subject of Dynamics. Co-requisite(s): ENS 208 .
  
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    ENS 210 Electrical Circuit Analysis

    Credits: (4)
    A first course in basic circuit theory. Topics covered include: circuit definitions, voltampere relationships for circuit elements, Kirchhoff’s laws; resistive circuit analysis including loop and nodal analysis, network theorems; transient behavior of R-L, R-C, and R L-C circuits; sinusoidal steady-state analysis and phasors; introduction to active devices such as transistors and operational amplifiers and applications of network theorems to circuits with active devices. Prerequisite(s): PHY 205 .
  
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    ENS 212 Mechanics of Materials

    Credits: (3)
    First course in the development of the mechanics of deformable bodies, primarily for engineering students. Topics include: theories of stress and strain, deformations, Hooke’s Law, axial loads, shearing loads, bending loads, design of beams, Mohr’s Circle, shear and bending moment diagrams, elastic stability and deflection of beams. Prerequisite(s): ENS 207  Co-requisite(s): MAT 264 

Environmental Technology

  
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    ENV 101 Introduction to Environmental Technology

    Credits: (4)
    This course provides an overview of the environmental technology field and also serves as the introductory course for the Environmental Technology program. The course applies the chemical, geological and biological sciences to environmental issues, and relates these issues to various possible career paths. Topics covered in the course include: governmental processes; hazardous materials, pollution, and related health effects; basic ecology; hazardous and non-hazardous waste disposal; biofuels and alternative energy technologies. In addition, the laboratory portion of the course will provide hands-on experience with work associated with the environmental industry. This course is the introductory course for both the biotechnology and geoscience options of the Environmental Technology AAS degree program. Three hours lecture and three hours laboratory per week.
  
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    ENV 103 Introduction to GIS

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces fundamental concepts of Geographic Information Systems and the major functionality contained within current integrated GIS software. In course exercises, students follow the GIS analytical process and work with a variety of software tools to solve realistic mapping problems. This course emphasizes practical GIS and GPS (Geographic Positioning System) skills. GIS is now used in fields as diverse as emergency management, law enforcement, business, engineering, etc. ENV 103 is a required course for the Environmental Technology AAS degree program.
  
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    ENV 104 Applied GIS

    Credits: (3)
    This course applies fundamental concepts of Geographic Information Systems and the major functionality contained within GIS Desktop software, as well as its extensions, Spatial Analyst and 3D Analyst, building on the concepts covered in ENV 103 . In course exercises, students follow the GIS analytical process and work with a variety of tools to solve realistic environmental problems, eventually presenting the result of an independent project in a professional grade presentation. This course emphasizes practical GIS and GPS (Geographic Positioning System) skills. ENV 104 is an elective course for the Environmental Technology AAS degree program. Prerequisite(s): ENV 103 .
  
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    ENV 110 Field Experience in Environmental Technology - Geoscience

    Credits: (1)
    A one credit field course designed for those students contemplating a career in Environmental Technology. The class will visit active, unrestricted sites currently undergoing remediation for soil and/or water contamination. Sampling protocols and proper field notetaking will be practiced. Two classroom sessions and two all day field trips during the fall semester.
  
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    ENV 162 Biofuels, Biomaterials, and Alternative Energy Technologies

    Credits: (3)
    This course will provide a general overview of various current and emerging bio-based and other sustainable technologies for the production of energy, fuels, and materials. ENV 162 will introduce the fundamentals of the biorefinery concept for sustainable manufacturing, along with more detailed investigations of specific bioprocesses and renewable energy technologies. Specifically, the course will highlight several biomaterials (i.e. bio-plastics, - chemicals, -pharmaceuticals), biofuels (i.e. bio-ethanol, -butanol, - methanol, -diesel, -methane, and - hydrogen), and alternative energy technologies (i.e. wind, solar, hydrological, geothermal, and fuel cells). Prerequisite(s): CHE 171   (formerly CHE 103) or BIO 151 .
  
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    ENV 165 Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides a comprehensive overview, covering all facets of hazardous waste management and emergency response. Topics include practical exercises and training, which may be applied to business, industry, construction and institutions, including Federal and State rules and regulations, handling procedures and proper operation of a designated waste facility, storage, labeling, manifesting, shipment, employee training, proper use of safety equipment, emergency response procedures (spills response and clean up), cost-effective waste reduction, and environmental reporting procedures. This course is offered as a one week 40-hour course over the winter intersession and will provide 40-Hour Hazardous Waste Operations and Emergency Response (HAZWOPER) certification as specified in OSHA 29CFR 1910.120.
  
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    ENV 201 Internship in Environmental Technology

    Credits: (2)
    This course is designed for students in their last semester of the ENV.AAS degree program, enabling them to gain real world experience with a private consulting firm or government agency. Students will spend a minimum of 40 hours working with a qualifying business or agency and attend two three-hour seminars. Prerequisite(s): ENV 101 .

English as a Second Language

  
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    ESL 087 Basic Reading and Vocabulary Skills for ESOL Students

    Credits: (3EQ)
    This course is designed specifically for ESOL students for the purpose of improving reading comprehension and vocabulary as preparation for college-level reading. The reading component will focus on improving comprehension at literal, inferential, and evaluative levels, using a variety of literary genres and non-fiction texts. The vocabulary component will focus on efficient methods of deriving meaning from context, Latin and Greek roots and affixes, and the dictionary. Prerequisite(s): LOEP Placement Test and Speaking Interview Co-requisite(s): ESL 098 .
  
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    ESL 098 Basic Grammar, Writing and Speaking

    Credits: (3EQ)
    This is a developmental grammar and writing course for non-native English speakers who need more specific, individualized practice in using grammar for effective written and oral communication in academic settings. It also exposes students to the formal conventions of writing and speaking by providing extensive practice on several aspects of academic writing, including drafting, composing, editing and revising. Students will apply the grammatical and discursive practice necessary in becoming more familiar with all aspects of Standard American English. ESL 098 is designed to complement ESL 115  (ESOL Composition I) and prepare students for the possible cultural barriers and affective issues associated with attending college. This foundational course provides 3 equivalent credit hours towards a fulltime schedule and is based on 3 equivalent credit hours; it carries 0 credit hours of academic credit. Co-requisite(s): ESL 115 
  
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    ESL 114 Academic Listening and Speaking

    Credits: (3)
    For ESL students only. This course develops the oral and listening skills necessary for communicating effectively in an academic environment. Focus is on improving pronunciation, stress and intonation while speaking, as well as enhancing vocabulary and acquiring deeper understandings of syntactical and semantic functions of oral English. The course also teaches the skills students will need to enhance their abilities to listen for content, take notes and participate in classroom discussions.
  
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    ESL 115 ESOL Composition I

    Credits: (3)
    Designed for non-native speakers of English. Emphasis is on writing multiple drafts to produce paragraphs that are unified around a controlling idea, are substantially and coherently developed, and are effectively concluded. Writing should conform to Standard American English. Focus is on writing in response to reading and on critical thinking in reading and writing. This course does not satisfy First Year English Composition requirements. For ESOL students only. Prerequisite(s): Current ESOL placement test.
  
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    ESL 116 ESOL Composition II

    Credits: (3)
    Designed for non-native speakers of English. Emphasis is on writing multiple drafts to produce essays that are unified around a central idea, are substantially and coherently developed, and are effectively concluded. Writing should conform to Standard American English. Focus is on writing in response to reading and on critical thinking in reading and writing. This course does not satisfy first year English composition requirements. For ESOL students only. Prerequisite(s): ESL 115  or current ESOL placement test.
  
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    ESL 118 College Reading and Vocabulary for ESOL Students

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed specifically for ESOL students for the purpose of improving reading comprehension and developing learning strategies and vocabulary, all at the college level. The reading component will focus on comprehension and expanding study strategies. The vocabulary component will focus on developing knowledge of Greek and Latin roots and affixes, identifying context clues, and practicing reinforcement strategies, as well as expanding college-level vocabulary in general. Prerequisite(s): LOEP placement test. For ESOL students only.
 

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