Oct 18, 2018  
College Catalog 2018-2019 
    
College Catalog 2018-2019

Course Descriptions


 

Mathematics

  
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    MAT 152 Statistics II

    Credits: (3)
    A continuation of Statistics I to include the topics two-sample analysis, linear and multiple regression, correlation, analysis of variance, non-parametric statistics and Chi-square goodness of fit. Time series analysis and/or statistical process control as time permits. Computer software and graphing calculator applications will be an integral component of this course. A graphing calculator with specific statistical capabilities will be required. Credit will not be given for both MAT 152 and BUS 220 . Prerequisite(s): MAT 151  or BUS 219  or equivalent.
  
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    MAT 161 Calculus I

    Credits: (4)
    This is a first course in calculus for students in mathematics, science, computer science and engineering. Topics include basic analytic geometry, functions, limits and continuity, derivatives of algebraic and trigonometric functions, chain rule, implicit differentiation, antiderivatives, definite integrals, Fundamental Theorem, applications of derivatives and integrals. Graphing calculator use is required. Prerequisite(s): Four years of college-preparatory mathematics (including trigonometry) or a C or better in Precalculus with Trigonometry (MAT 143 ) or Mathematics for Technical Disciplines II (MAT 120 ) or permission of instructor.
  
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    MAT 162 Calculus II

    Credits: (4)
    A second course in calculus for students in mathematics, science, and engineering. Applications of integrals; derivatives and integrals of exponential, logarithmic, and inverse trigonometric functions; indeterminate forms and L’Hôpital’s rule; techniques of integration; improper integrals; numerical integration; infinite series; conic sections; parametric equations; polar coordinates and polar graphs. Graphing calculator use is required. Prerequisite(s): MAT 161 Calculus I , or equivalent.
  
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    MAT 241 Linear Algebra

    Credits: (3)
    This elective for Engineering, Computer Science, and Liberal Arts and Sciences: Mathematics and Science majors introduces students to the deductive style of higher-level mathematics courses. Topics include systems of linear equations, matrices, real vector spaces, subspaces, linear independence, basis, dimension, row and column space of a matrix, linear transformations, kernel, range, matrix of a linear transformation, determinants, eigenvalues, and eigenvectors, and Gram-Schmidt Process. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in Calculus I (MAT 161 ) or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
  
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    MAT 251 Discrete Mathematics

    Credits: (3)
    This course covers the study of set theory, logic, techniques of proof, basic number theory, functions, relations, algorithms, combinatorics, partitions, recurrence relations, induction, and recursion. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in Calculus I (MAT 161 ) or permission of instructor.
  
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    MAT 263 Calculus III

    Credits: (4)
    The following topics are studied: vectors, vector functions, 3-dimensional analytic geometry, partial derivatives, total differentials, gradients, multiple integrals, line integrals, Green’s theorem, Stokes’s theorem. Prerequisite(s): MAT 162 .
  
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    MAT 264 Differential Equations

    Credits: (4)
    A course designed primarily for Math/Science and Engineering majors. Topics include: definitions, first-order differential equations, linear equations of order two and higher, Laplace transforms, series solutions, systems of differential equations, numerical solution methods, modeling applications. Prerequisite(s): MAT 162 .

Mechanical Technology

  
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    MET 150 Introduction to Engineering

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the engineering discipline/profession. Topics covered will include the following: an introduction to the various types of engineering majors and professions, engineering design and analysis methods, elementary engineering statistics and data analysis, computer literacy, working in a team setting, oral and written communications, use of practical engineering tools, and engineering ethics. Coverage of computer literacy may include word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation software (MS Word, Excel, PowerPoint), graphical applications software (CAD or solid modeling), scientific programming, and mathematical or laboratory software applications.
  
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    MET 151 Machine Tools

    Credits: (3)
    A study of basic theory and laboratory experiences for lathes, milling, drilling, grinding, bench work, and shaping operations. Study of cutting speeds, surfact finishes as well as machine cababilities is included. Two class hours and a three hour laboratory.
  
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    MET 152 Machine Tools

    Credits: (3)
    A continuation of MET 151 . Additional theory and laboratory experiences include: milling, attachments, broaching, machine tooling, tapers, heat treating, metal finishes, and inspection. Also basic programming and operations of numerical control equipment. The basic applications of jigs and fixtures. Prerequisite(s): MET 151  or permission of instructor. Two class hours and laboratory.
  
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    MET 153 Introduction to Modern Manufacturing

    Credits: (3)
    This course compares traditional manufacturing to modern manufacturing. Elements of Kaizen, Delivery, Accelerated Lead Time Reduction, and Work Place Organization, along with their applications are studied. Pull Systems, Cellular Manufacturing, Statistical Process Control, and Value Stream Mapping are also investigated. Each is studied as to how they relate to one another and the total process of modern manufacturing.
  
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    MET 161 Engineering Drawing I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to prepare students with the necessary skills to interpret and construct engineering drawings. Lectures address such topics as drawing interpretation, orthographic projection systems, dimensioning, geometric dimensioning, and tolerancing, while laboratory sessions give the students practice in drawing creation. Two class hours and three laboratory hours per week.
  
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    MET 171 Manufacturing Processes

    Credits: (3)
    This course covers the principles and procedures of various manufacturing processes used in modern industries. Material selection and machine tools required for the processes are emphasized. Two class hours and a three-hour lab per week.
  
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    MET 251 Appl Strength/Materials

    Credits: (4)
    This course is a study of basic stress-strain analysis as applied to mechanical members. Topics include stress-strain relationships, co-planar force systems, stress in trusses, deformation, shear, torsion, bending moments, centroids, moments of inertia, and deflection of beams. Prerequisite(s): MAT 120  or higher, or permission of instructor. Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week.
  
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    MET 252 Physical Metallurgy

    Credits: (3)
    Provides a sound foundation of learning in the area of properties and microstructures of the important ferrous and nonferrous alloys. Also provides a firm foundation relative to the understanding of internal metallic structures of metals. The contents of the course include: metallic structures, the unit cell, atomic radius, planer density, effects of stress and temperature on simple metal structures, ferrous alloys (steel, superalloys, cast iron, ductile iron, malleable iron), phase diagrams, aluminum alloys, heat treatment of metals. Prerequisite(s): MAT 119  or higher or permission of instructor. Two class hours, three lab hours.
  
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    MET 254 Numerical Control Programming

    Credits: (3)
    Designed to prepare students with the necessary skills to program NC and CNC controlled machine tools. Lectures address such topics as drawing interpretation, program formats, input media, sub-routines, canned cycles, and tooling, while the laboratory sessions give the students practice in programming learned techniques. Prerequisite(s): MET 261  or permission of instructor; Co-requisite(s): MET 151 . Two class hours and three laboratory hours.
  
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    MET 261 Introduction to CAD

    Credits: (3)
    An introductory course in CAD (Computer-Aided-Drafting) utilizing state-of-the-art software. Topics to include the manipulation of the basic drawing commands to construct computer-detailed, multi-view drawings with printer/plotter hard copy output. Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): MET 161  or permission of instructor.
  
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    MET 270 Solid Modeling

    Credits: (4)
    A course designed to acquaint students with parametric computer-aided design software. Utilizing state-of the- art software, students will be introduced to the manipulation of basic commands necessary to construct three-dimensional models, including datum plane creation, extrusions, cuts, sweeps, and blends. Prerequisite(s): MET 261  or permission of instructor. Four credit hours.
  
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    MET 275 Engineering Computations

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the concepts of Engineering Computations while utilizing contemporary spreadsheet and MATLAB software. Topics include computational theory, number representation (scalars, arrays, and matrices), and programming constructs such as algorithm development and flow-charting. Root finding, matrix methods, simultaneous equations, numerical integration, and optimization will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): MAT 120  or higher, or permission of instructor.
  
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    MET 291 Cooperative Education

    Credits: (3)
    Designed to provide work experience directly related to the student’s field of study. A learning contract, containing specific educational objectives related to the work experience and the student’s field of study, is developed by the student and the faculty co-op coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 180 hours of work in the student’s field of study, maintenance of a work journal to record hours worked and duties performed, and a final paper. This will allow the student to earn three credit hours. The student’s performance will be evaluated by the faculty co-op coordinator on the basis of meeting the objectives in the learning contract and satisfactory evaluations by the employer.

Music

  
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    MUS 066 Beginning Music Reading I

    Credits: (1EQ)
    This is an introductory course for Music Reading (MUS 101R ). Course content includes instruction in the recognition/performance of rhythms, pitches, meters, and notational systems
  
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    MUS 067 Beginning Music Reading II

    Credits: (1EQ)
    This is an introductory course for Music Reading. This course is a continuation of MUS 066 , which includes instruction in the recognition/performance of rhythms, pitches, and meters.  Prerequisite(s): MUS 066 .
  
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    MUS 100A Convocation

    Credits: (1)
    This course will provide professional concerts to help build strong professional music attitudes concerning repertoire and performance. Additionally, this course will provide performing opportunities for soloists or groups presenting professional level concerts. It will also raise the level of professional musical consciousness for many performing mediums and studies.
  
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    MUS 100B Convocation

    Credits: (1)
    This course will provide professional concerts to help build strong professional music attitudes concerning repertoire and performance. Additionally, this course will provide performing opportunities for soloists or groups presenting professional level concerts. It will also raise the level of professional musical consciousness for many performing mediums and studies.
  
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    MUS 100C Convocation

    Credits: (1)
    This course will provide professional concerts to help build strong professional music attitudes concerning repertoire and performance. Additionally, this course will provide performing opportunities for soloists or groups presenting professional level concerts. It will also raise the level of professional musical consciousness for many performing mediums and studies.
  
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    MUS 100D Convocation

    Credits: (1)
    This course will provide professional concerts to help build strong professional music attitudes concerning repertoire and performance. Additionally, this course will provide performing opportunities for soloists or groups presenting professional level concerts. It will also raise the level of professional musical consciousness for many performing mediums and studies.
  
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    MUS 101D Diction for Singers

    Credits: (3)
    A basic study of French, German and Italian diction with practical application to singing.
  
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    MUS 101K Keyboard Harmony

    Credits: (1)
    The goal of this course is to familiarize students with fundamental concepts involved in harmonizing melodies at the piano, particularly as those concepts apply to playing from a “lead sheet” (i.e., melodies with chord symbols) and to develop the necessary skill to harmonize simple melodies without chord symbols.
  
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    MUS 101R Music Reading I

    Credits: (1)
    Music Reading courses (MUS 101R, 102R , 201R , and 202R ) are four-semester sequenced aural skills courses designed for music majors looking to transfer to four-year music schools. Topics included in MUS 101R are singing prepared melodic examples using solfeggio syllables, singing unprepared melodies (sight singing), performing rhythmic exercises, and melodic, rhythmic, and harmonic dictation. Prerequisite(s): Music Theory placement exam. Co-requisite(s): MUS 101T  or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 101T Music Theory I

    Credits: (3)
    This course covers notation, scales (major, minor, and chromatic), tempo designations, intervals, triads, seventh chords, modes, figured bass, and species counterpoint. Prerequisite(s): Music Theory placement exam and permission of instructor. Co-requisite(s): MUS 101R .
  
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    MUS 102K Keyboard Harmony

    Credits: (1)
    This course will familiarize students with certain fundamental concepts involved in harmonizing melodies at the piano, particularly as these concepts apply to playing from “lead sheets” (melodies with chord symbols) and to develop the ability to harmonize simple melodies without chord symbols.
  
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    MUS 102R Music Reading II

    Credits: (1)
    Music Reading courses (MUS 101R , 102R, MUS 201R  and MUS 202R ) are a four-semester sequenced aural skills course designed for music majors looking to transfer to four-year music schools to complete their musical education leading to the B.M., B.S. or B.A. degree in music. The course is complementary with the music department’s Music Theory courses (MUS 101T , MUS 102T , MUS 201T  and MUS 202T ) and Keyboard classes (MUS 101K , MUS 102K , MUS 201K  and MUS 202K ), and should be taken in proper sequence with them. Topics included in MUS 102R are singing prepared melodic examples using solfeggio syllables, singing unprepared melodies (sight singing), singing triads and seventh chords, performing rhythmic exercises and melodic and rhythmic dictation. Prerequisite(s): MUS 101R  or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): MUS 102T  or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 102T Music Theory

    Credits: (3)
    Four-part harmony and figured bass studies are continued, non-harmonic tones are included, instrumental transpositions, arrangements and performances are done, and introduction to dodecaphonic technique through analysis is included. This course will also have ear training in chord quality and position, two-part melodic dictation, and identification of non-harmonic tones. Prerequisite(s): MUS 101T  or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 103 Music Appreciation I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the basic elements of music with an emphasis on what to listen for in all music. The styles of important composers of the 18th and 19th centuries will be compared and discussed in relation to the cultural and historical background of the times in which they lived, as well as their impact and influence on the many styles of music we listen to today.
  
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    MUS 104 Music Appreciation II

    Credits: (3)
    This course focuses on the diverse styles of music composed from the beginning of the 20th century through the present day, including European and American concert music, jazz, popular music, music for film and stage, and music of non-European cultures. Topics include the role that music plays in society, as well as its impact on other disciplines from advertising to medicine.
  
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    MUS 105 Survey of Western Music History I

    Credits: (3)
    A survey of music in western civilization from Greek antiquity through the Baroque Era, including an analysis of the evolution of music styles from the Early Christian Era to about 1750. Not open to non-music majors. Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): Major-level music theory course (MUS 101T , MUS 102T , MUS 201T , or MUS 202T ) or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 106 Survey of Western Music History II

    Credits: (3)
    A survey of music in western civilization from the early Classical Period to World War II, including an analysis of the evolution of music styles from mid- 18th century to about 1940. MUS 105  is not required for this course, which is not open to non-music majors. Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): Major-level music theory course (MUS 101T , MUS 102T , MUS 201T , MUS 202T ) or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 107A-Z Applied Music Instruction

    Credits: (2)
    Private study for each student in voice, piano, guitar, electric bass and drum set or an orchestral or band instrument depending upon availability of faculty. Department audition and permission card required. Additional fee for private lessons.
  
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    MUS 108A-Z Applied Music Instruction

    Credits: (2)
    Major private study for each student in voice, piano, guitar, electric bass and drum set or an orchestral or band instrument depending upon availability of faculty. Department audition and permission card required. Additional fee for private lessons.
  
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    MUS 109A-Z Applied Music Instruction

    Credits: (2)
    Private study for each student in voice, piano, guitar, electric bass and drum set or an orchestral or band instrument depending upon availability of faculty. Department audition and permission card required. Additional fee for private lessons.
  
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    MUS 110A-Z Applied Music Instruction

    Credits: (2)
    Private study for each student in voice, piano, guitar, electric bass and drum set or an orchestral or band instrument depending upon availability of faculty. Department audition and permission card required. Additional fee for private lessons.
  
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    MUS 111A-Z Applied Music Instruction

    Credits: (2)
    Private study for each student in voice, piano, guitar, electric bass and drum set or an orchestral or band instrument depending upon availability of faculty. Department audition and permission card required. Additional fee for private lessons.
  
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    MUS 112A-Z Applied Music Instruction

    Credits: (2)
    Private study for each student in voice, piano, guitar, electric bass and drum set or an orchestral or band instrument depending upon availability of faculty. Department audition and permission card required. Additional fee for private lessons.
  
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    MUS 113 Applied Piano Minor

    Credits: (1)
    Non-piano majors must study piano for four semesters or until able to pass a proficiency examination.
  
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    MUS 113A Applied Piano Minor Class

    Credits: (1)
    A beginning course designed for non-music majors to teach basic technique/reading on piano in an electric piano lab.
  
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    MUS 114 Applied Piano Minor

    Credits: (1)
    Non-piano majors must study piano for four semesters or until able to pass a proficiency examination.
  
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    MUS 115 Applied Piano Minor

    Credits: (1)
    Non-piano majors must study piano for four semesters or until able to pass a proficiency examination.
  
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    MUS 116 Applied Piano Minor

    Credits: (1)
    Non-piano majors must study piano for four semesters or until able to pass a proficiency examination.
  
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    MUS 121A-Z Repertory

    Credits: (1)
    This course is an intensive study of the history and literature available and/or performance methods for each of the instrumental or vocal disciplines for which the course is offered. Music majors only or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 122A-Z Repertory

    Credits: (1)
    This course is an intensive study of the history and literature available and/or performance methods for each of the instrumental or vocal disciplines for which the course is offered. Music majors only or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 141 Beginning Alexander Technique

    Credits: (3)
    Students will learn, practice, and demonstrate the basic principles of the Alexander Technique. The class work will take course members through a variety of applications, for example: breathing, speaking, singing, playing an Instrument, sitting, standing, walking, lifting, carrying, reaching, and beding. Students will apply the Alexander Technique as a form of selfcare while practicing and performing. Students will develop awareness of mental and physical reactions - having time to prevent unwanted tensions and to coordinate a total body response that promotes freedom and growth. Through course work students not only learn to use conscious thinking to make efficient use of the self, body, and mind, but also to maintain a psychophysical balance that allows the spontaneous and free expression of their creativity.
  
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    MUS 151B-Y Ensemble

    Credits: (0.5)
    This course provides suitable repertoire for study and performance for the particular ensemble, and it provides the vehicles for the successful study and performance of that repertoire. Additionally, this course supplies sufficient performing opportunities whether departmental, college-wide, or in the community. Lastly, this course illustrates varied teaching techniques for that particular type of ensemble.
  
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    MUS 152B-Y Ensemble

    Credits: (0.5)
    This course provides suitable repertoire for study and performance for the particular ensemble, and it provides the vehicles for the successful study and performance of that repertoire. Additionally, this course supplies sufficient performing opportunities whether departmental, college-wide, or in the community. Lastly, this course illustrates varied teaching techniques for that particular type of ensemble.
  
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    MUS 160 Introduction to Music Theory I

    Credits: (3)
    This is a course in basic music theory, including notation, scales, intervals, rhythmic elements, ear training, chords, and modes. MUS 160 is designed for the non-music major and/or prospective music major, as determined by an audition process. No prerequisites. Not applicable to MUS.AS curriculum requirements.
  
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    MUS 161 Introduction Music Theory II

    Credits: (3)
    This course continues the studies of scales, intervals, key signatures, and chords. Compound meter and harmonization of melodies will be introduced. Not applicable to MUS.AS curriculum requirements. Prerequisite(s): MUS 160  or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 162P Hand Drumming

    Credits: (2)
    Class instruction for the beginner and the hand drummer needing a refresher course in the fundamentals of hand drumming. Major emphasis given to technique and classic rhythms.
  
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    MUS 162T Guitar Class I

    Credits: (2)
    Class instruction for the beginning guitarist. Both pick and finger-style (classical) guitar are taught simultaneously. A primary goal will be to develop sight reading skills.
  
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    MUS 162U Voice Class I

    Credits: (2)
    This course is for the beginner and the vocalist needing a refresher course in voice fundamentals. Major emphasis given to breathing exercises and vocalization technique. Classical and folk singing in groups and individual settings.
  
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    MUS 162X The Art of Popular Singing

    Credits: (2)
    Class instruction for the vocalist, from beginning to advanced, focusing on jazz and pop performance techniques that comprise the skills of what is traditionally called popular singing. This is not a course in voice fundamentals (MUS 162U ), but rather a class-oriented setting designed to enhance the vocalist’s abilities specifically in the jazz/pop idiom.
  
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    MUS 163T Guitar II

    Credits: (2)
    This course is a continuation of techniques from MUS 162T .
  
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    MUS 166 Introduction to Ethnic Music

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a study of African music and its influence on other cultures (specifically those of the African Diaspora). Prerequisite(s): There are no prerequisites.
  
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    MUS 168 Drum Set I

    Credits: (1)
    In this course, basic rhythmic reading skills are taught. Additional material covered includes basic hand technique, coordination exercises, and chart reading. Playing time on drum set is dependent on class size/background of those registered. Prerequisite(s): No prerequisite, but some musical background is preferred.
  
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    MUS 182 Music as a Business

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a basic introduction to the music industry both for students interested in transferring as music industry majors or to enhance their understanding of the business aspects of music. The course introduces basic principles of commercial law and business management as they apply in the music industry including contract law, basic business entities,nagency and management, copyright law, performing rights organizations, labor unions, and other subjects such as sound recording, print music publishing, musical instrument manufacture and marketing, bootlegging and piracy, and illegal downloading depending upon student interest and current trends.
  
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    MUS 185 Piano Literature of the 18th Century

    Credits: (1)
    The final goals for the students in this course are: 1 - An aural familiarity with the forms and styles of the major keyboard composers of the 18th century; 2 - An academic understanding of the major keyboard composers of this era and their principal works.
  
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    MUS 186 Piano Literature of the Early 19th Century

    Credits: (1)
    The final goals for the students in this course are: 1 - An aural familiarity with the forms and styles of the major keyboard composers of the early 19th century; 2 - An academic understanding of the major keyboard composers of this era and their principal works.
  
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    MUS 187 Piano Literature of the Late 19th Century

    Credits: (1)
    The final goals for the students in this course are: 1 - An aural familiarity with the forms and styles of the major keyboard composers of the late 19th century; 2 - An academic understanding of the major keyboard composers of this era and their principal works.
  
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    MUS 188 Piano Literature of the 20th Century

    Credits: (1)
    The final goals for the students in this course are: 1 - An aural familiarity with the forms and styles of the major keyboard composers of the 20th and early 21st centuries; 2 - An academic understanding of the major keyboard composers of this era and their principal works.
  
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    MUS 190 Introduction to Music Software With MIDI

    Credits: (3)
    A study of MIDI applications using hardware and software as a tool to improve musicianship. The course will utilize the new technology to enhance and reinforce basic classroom concepts. Emphasis will be placed on hands-on involvement using software programs for Music Theory, Music History, and Jazz Improvisation.
  
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    MUS 201K Keyboard Harmony

    Credits: (1)
    This course explores secondary dominants, diminished seventh chords, augmented sixth chords, chord substitution, and chord nomenclature; pieces embodying these elements are studied in arrangements done by the student. Prerequisite(s): MUS 102K  or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 201R Music Reading III

    Credits: (1)
    Music Reading courses (MUS 101R , MUS 102R , 201R and MUS 202R ) are a four-semester sequenced aural skills course designed for music majors looking to transfer to four-year music schools to complete their musical education leading to the B.M., B.S. or B.A. degree in music. The course is complementary with the music department’s Music Theory courses (MUS 101T , MUS 102T , MUS 201T  and MUS 202T ) and Keyboard classes (MUS 101K , MUS 102K , MUS 201K  and MUS 202K ), and should be taken in proper sequence with them. Topics included in MUS 201R are singing prepared melodic examples using solfeggio syllables, singing unprepared melodies (sight singing), singing triads and seventh chords, singing in the principal modes, performing rhythmic exercises and melodic and rhythmic dictation. Prerequisite(s): MUS 102R  or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): MUS 201T  or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 201T Music Theory

    Credits: (3)
    This course reviews diatonic chords and progression. Seventh chords are analyzed along with non-dominant seventh chords and their progressions. Altered non-harmonic tones and secondary dominants are studied along with modulation to closely related keys and harmonization of melodies. Four-part dictation is introduced. Prerequisite(s): MUS 101T  and MUS 102T , or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 202K Keyboard Harmony II

    Credits: (1)
    The goal of this course is to familiarize students with advanced concepts involved in harmonizing melodies at the piano, particularly as those concepts apply to playing from a “lead sheet” (i.e., melodies with chord symbols) and to develop the necessary skill to harmonize melodies without chord symbols. Aural skills related to harmonizing, singing, and accompanying melodic lines in a classroom setting will be included. This course is a continuation of MUS 201K  with the additions of more complex chromatic harmony and piano texture.
  
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    MUS 202R Music Reading IV

    Credits: (1)
    Music Reading courses (MUS 101R , MUS 102R , MUS 201R  and 202R) are a four-semester sequenced aural skills course designed for music majors looking to transfer to four-year music schools to complete their musical education leading to the B.M., B.S. or B.A. degree in music. The course is complementary with the music department’s Music Theory courses (MUS 101T , MUS 102T , MUS 201T  and MUS 202T ) and Keyboard classes (MUS 101K , MUS 102K , MUS 201K  and MUS 202K ), and should be taken in proper sequence with them. Topics included in MUS 202R are singing prepared melodic examples using solfeggio syllables, singing unprepared melodies (sight singing), singing triads and seventh chords, singing in the principal modes, singing octatonic and whole-tone scales, performing rhythmic exercises while conducting, and melodic and rhythmic dictation. Prerequisite(s): MUS 201R  or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): MUS 202T  or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 202T Music Theory

    Credits: (3)
    Chromatic harmony will be reviewed through harmonic, structural, and textural analysis. 18th century counterpoint, terminology, and contrapuntal forms (invention, canon, and fugue), and basic principles of two-part writing will be introduced through analysis. Classical sonata form will be studied and an analytical paper based on a standard classical sonata form piece will be required. The rise of non-functional harmony will be introduced along with developments in the early and mid-20th century, to include impressionism generally along with the expansion of timbral resources, modal and non-diatonic scales, upper-overtone harmony, non-tertian harmony, serialism, pandiatonicism, neoclassicism, minimalism, aleatoric principles, and free atonality.
  
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    MUS 203 Introduction to Composition

    Credits: (3)
    This is a course in beginning music composition. Aesthetic concepts and specific detailed theoretical concepts and techniques, particularly of the 20th and 21st centuries will be covered as will introductory 18th century counterpoint. Students must have one year of basic music theory and be able to read music to take this course.
  
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    MUS 211A-Z Applied Music Instruction

    Credits: (2)
    Private study for each student in voice, piano, guitar, electric bass, and drum set, or an orchestral or band instrument depending upon availability of faculty. Department audition and permission card required. Additional fee for private lessons.
  
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    MUS 212A-Z Applied Music Instruction

    Credits: (2)
    Private study for each student in voice, piano, guitar, electric bass, and drum set, or an orchestral or band instrument depending upon availability of faculty. Department audition and permission card required. Additional fee for private lessons.
  
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    MUS 215A-Z Applied Music Instruction

    Credits: (2)
    Private study for each student in voice, piano, guitar, electric bass, and drum set, or an orchestral or band instrument depending upon availability of faculty. Department audition and permission card required. Additional fee for private lessons.
  
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    MUS 216A-Z Applied Music Instruction

    Credits: (2)
    Private study for each student in voice, piano, guitar, electric bass, and drum set, or an orchestral or band instrument depending upon availability of faculty. Department audition and permission card required. Additional fee for private lessons.
  
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    MUS 217A-Z Applied Music Instruction

    Credits: (2)
    Private study for each student in voice, piano, guitar, electric bass, and drum set, or an orchestral or band instrument depending upon availability of faculty. Department audition and permission card required. Additional fee for private lessons.
  
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    MUS 218A-Z Applied Music Instruction

    Credits: (2)
    Private study for each student in voice, piano, guitar, electric bass, and drum set, or an orchestral or band instrument depending upon availability of faculty. Department audition and permission card required. Additional fee for private lessons.
  
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    MUS 221A-Z Repertory

    Credits: (1)
    This course is an intensive study of the history and literature available and/or performance methods for each of the instrumental or vocal disciplines for which the course is offered. Music majors only or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 222A-Z Repertory

    Credits: (1)
    This course is an intensive study of the history and literature available and/or performance methods for each of the instrumental or vocal disciplines for which the course is offered. Music majors only or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 223A-Z Repertory

    Credits: (1)
    This is an optional continuation of the required MUS 121A-Z , MUS 122A-Z , MUS 221A-Z , MUS 222A-Z  sequence of courses needed by MUS majors to transfer successfully to four-year music colleges. MUS majors who have completed the four-semester sequence who wish to continue in Applied Music Repertory study may register for MUS223A-Z and MUS 224A-Z . Music majors only or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 224A-Z Repertory

    Credits: (1)
    This is an optional continuation of the required MUS 121A-Z , MUS 122A-Z , MUS 221A-Z , MUS 222A-Z  sequence of courses needed by MUS majors to transfer successfully to four-year music colleges. MUS majors who have completed the four-semester sequence who wish to continue in Applied Music Repertory study may register for MUS 223A-Z  and 224A-Z. Music majors only or permission of instructor.
  
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    MUS 251A-Z Ensemble

    Credits: (0.5)
    This course provides suitable repertoire for study and performance for the particular ensemble, and it provides the vehicles for the successful study and performance of that repertoire. Additionally, this course supplies sufficient performing opportunities whether departmental, college-wide, or in the community. Lastly, this course illustrates varied teaching techniques for that particular type of ensemble.
  
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    MUS 252A-Z Ensemble

    Credits: (0.5)
    This course provides suitable repertoire for study and performance for the particular ensemble, and it provides the vehicles for the successful study and performance of that repertoire. Additionally, this course supplies sufficient performing opportunities whether departmental, college-wide, or in the community. Lastly, this course illustrates varied teaching techniques for that particular type of ensemble.
  
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    MUS 253A-Z Ensemble

    Credits: (0.5)
    This course provides suitable repertoire for study and performance for the particular ensemble, and it provides the vehicles for the successful study and performance of that repertoire. Additionally, this course supplies sufficient performing opportunities whether departmental, college-wide, or in the community. Lastly, this course illustrates varied teaching techniques for that particular type of ensemble.
  
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    MUS 254A-Z Ensemble

    Credits: (0.5)
    This course provides suitable repertoire for study and performance for the particular ensemble, and it provides the vehicles for the successful study and performance of that repertoire. Additionally, this course supplies sufficient performing opportunities whether departmental, college-wide, or in the community. Lastly, this course illustrates varied teaching techniques for that particular type of ensemble.

Nuclear Technology

  
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    NET 101 Power Plant Fundamentals I for Nuclear Energy Technicians

    Credits: (3)
    This course will cover the core topics needed by electrical, mechanical, chemical, and Instrumentation and Controls technicians working in the nuclear power industry (in accordance with the Institute of Nuclear Power Operators ACAD 08-006). The student will learn basic atomic and nuclear physics, properties of reactor plant materials, radiation protection and detection, and reactor plant protection. Prerequisite(s): MAT 114  or higher.
  
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    NET 102 Power Plant Fundamentals II for Nuclear Energy Technicians

    Credits: (4)
    This course builds upon the knowledge acquired in NET 101 . In accordance with ACAD 08-006, the student will learn principles and concepts necessary to work safely and effectively in the nuclear energy industry. Topics include: basic reactor operations, heat transfer, steam, and fluid flow. Prerequisite(s): NET 101   Co-requisite(s): MAT 120 
  
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    NET 111 Mechanical Principles and Concepts

    Credits: (1)
    This course will cover the fundamentals of mechanical principles and concepts needed by electrical, mechanical, and Instrumentation and Controls technicians to meet their Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree requirements, and to fulfill the needs of the nuclear power industry in accordance with ACAD 08-006 so that all graduates have the same basic knowledge necessary to be successful nuclear power plant workers. Mechanical principles and concepts covered include SI/English Units, Lubrication Principles, Viscosity Principles, Simple Machines, Temperature Scales, Physical Effects on Process Fluids, and Measuring of Process Fluid Parameters. Prerequisite(s): MAT 114  or higher.
  
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    NET 112 Chemistry for Nuclear Technicians

    Credits: (3)
    This course will cover the fundamentals of chemistry needed by electrical, mechanical, and Instrumentation and Controls technicians to meet their Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree requirements, and to fulfill the needs of the nuclear power industry in accordance with ACAD 08-006 so that all graduates have the same basic knowledge necessary to be successful nuclear power plant workers. A study of acids and bases, conductivity, mixtures, solutions, compounds, Periodic Table, pH, properties of gases, and states of matter are discussed. In addition, basic water chemistry control fundamentals, ion exchange theory, principles of water treatment, and applied reactor system water chemistry are covered. Prerequisite(s): MAT 114  or higher.
  
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    NET 201 Power Plant Fundamentals III for Nuclear Energy Technicians

    Credits: (4)
    This course will cover the core topics needed by electrical, mechanical, and Instrumentation and Controls technicians working in the nuclear power industry (in accordance with the Institute of Nuclear Power Operators ACAD 08-006).  The student will learn about operation and use of plant components with related power plant systems and basic power plant systems machinery/equipment. Prerequisite(s): NET 101  and NET 102 .
  
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    NET 202 Power Plant Fundamentals IV for Nuclear Energy Technicians

    Credits: (4)
    This course will cover some of the core topics needed by electrical, mechanical, and instrumentation and controls technicians working in the nuclear power industry (in accordance with the Institute of Nuclear Power Operators ACAD 08-006). The student will learn about basic construction, application, and operation of basic plant components. Also, a description of general systems and components, focusing on in-depth knowledge required for specific jobs tailored to the individual maintenance discipline. Prerequisite(s): NET 101 , NET 102 , and NET 201 .
  
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    NET 240 Process Control and Communications

    Credits: (4)
    This course will cover the discipline-specific topics needed by maintenance personnel to meet their Associate of Applied Science (AAS) degree requirements and fulfill the needs of the nuclear power industry in accordance with ACAD 08-006 so that all graduates have the same basic knowledge necessary to be successful nuclear power plant workers. Topics covered are specific to the instrumentation and control. Prerequisite(s): NET 201 .
  
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    NET 281 Nuclear Operations Fundamentals

    Credits: (3)
    This course will cover the core topics needed by non-licensed operators working in the nuclear power industry (in accordance with the Institute of Nuclear Power Operators ACAD 08-006). The student will learn about the operation and monitoring of systems and components related to Nuclear Power Plants. Prerequisite(s): Completion of NET 102  and NET 112  with a B- or better.

Nutrition

  
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    NTR 101 Nutrition for Healthcare Professionals

    Credits: (1)
    This course is a study of the principles of basic nutrition as they relate to normal growth, development and health. The student will study the various food guidelines, popular diets, energy nutrients, vitamins and minerals, and how nutrient intake can impact body systems and processes. This one credit course is geared towards students entering the health professions who need a survey course on nutrition and its relationship to medical nutrition therapy.
  
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    NTR 104 Contemporary Nutrition

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an exploration of the essential nutrients and will give the student the working knowledge of the principles of nutrition. Nutrition information to include digestion, absorption, storage and metabolism of the essential nutrients, their functions, requirements, sources and how these relate to the life cycle and disease conditions. The student will study how adequate diets and weight maintenance can affect general health, diseases and food requirements for all ages from pre-natal to adult years. Current nutritional research, popular diets, diet trends, food availability, consumerism and diets of various national, global, social and economic groups are studied.
  
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    NTR 206 Diet Therapy

    Credits: (3)
    A continuation of the study of nutrition. The student will develop an understanding of the factors which make dietary modifications necessary for the treatment of disease; the principles of calculation, preparation, and service of modified diet; and the role of the dietitian in relation to total dietary care of an individual. Prerequisite(s): NTR 104 .
 

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