May 23, 2018  
College Catalog 2018-2019 
    
College Catalog 2018-2019

Course Descriptions


 

Physics

  
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    PHY 103R General Physics I Recitation

    Credits: (1EQ)
    Optional recitation section for PHY 103 . Provides an opportunity for students to apply the basic laws of mechanics and to develop problem-solving skills. Structured as small group activities; requires completion of worksheets weekly.
  
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    PHY 104 General Physics II

    Credits: (4)
    The continuation of PHY 103 . Topics covered include Vibrations and Wave motion, Physical and Geometrical Optics, Electricity and Magnetism, simple AC and DC Circuits and Modern Physics. Prerequisite(s): PHY 103  or equivalent. Two class hours, two recitation hours, and two laboratory hours.
  
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    PHY 105 Physics I-Mechanics

    Credits: (4)
    The first course of a calculus-level sequence in general physics, primarily for engineering students or for students majoring in the physical sciences. Kinematics and dynamics of a particle, Newton’s laws of motion, work and energy, momentum, rotational motion, and gravity. Co-requisite(s): MAT 161 . Three class hours and three laboratory hours. Only four (4) credits in either PHY 103  or PHY 105 may be used toward degree requirements.
  
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    PHY 105R Physics I Recitation

    Credits: (1EQ)
    This is an optional recitation section for students taking PHY 105 . It is structured as small group activities and provides students an opportunity to develop problem-solving skills in the subject of Mechanics. Co-requisite(s): PHY 105 
  
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    PHY 205 Physics II - Electricity and Magnetism

    Credits: (4)
    An analytic treatment of electricity and magnetism, electrostatics, electric current, magnetic fields, electromagnetic induction and Maxwell’s equations. Prerequisite(s): PHY 105  Co-requisite(s): MAT 162 . Three class hours and three laboratory hours.
  
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    PHY 205R Physics II Recitation

    Credits: (1EQ)
    This is an optional recitation section for students taking PHY 205 . It is structured as small group activities and provides students an opportunity to develop problem-solving skills in the subject of Electricity and Magnetism. Co-requisite(s): PHY 205 
  
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    PHY 206 Physics III-Thermodynamics and Waves

    Credits: (4)
    Heat transfer and thermodynamics, periodic motion, wave propagation, sound, light, and elements of modern physics. Prerequisite(s): PHY 105  Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): MAT 162 . Three class hours and three laboratory hours.

Political Science

  
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    POS 100 American National Politics

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines American political principles, institutions, processes, and controversies. Emphasis will be placed on the historical development of institutions including Congress, the Presidency, and the Supreme Court. Students will study the theoretical foundations of the American regime and analyze the U.S. Constitution. Significant attention will be given to how successive generations of Americans have interpreted the meaning of the foundational principles of equality and liberty.
  
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    POS 102 State and Local Politics

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the role of state and local governments in the American political system, with special emphasis on New York State’s government institutions, political processes and public policies. The evolving nature of federalism and intergovernmental relations is covered as is the value of civic participation in state and local affairs.
  
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    POS 198 Introduction to Political Thought

    Credits: (3)
    This course surveys the history of political philosophy from Plato through Rawls. Students will consider fundamental political questions related to justice, liberty, equality, human nature, and power. Original philosophical texts will be analyzed and discussed.
  
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    POS 201 Comparative Politics

    Credits: (3)
    Students will learn about six of the world’s regions and particular nation-states within those regions, in comparison to one other and to the USA. Historical and geographical factors will be examined to determine their effects on the contemporary political, economic and social patterns that exist in each of the regions. Future problems and prospects for each region will also be explored.
  
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    POS 215 The Politics of Native American - U.S. Relations

    Credits: (3)
    This course will cover three aspects of the relationship between Native American peoples and the US government. The first includes a sample of Native American governance and law that existed prior to European settlement, its later influence on the US founding, and its rebirth. The second part of the course will examine US government policies toward native tribes from 1790 to the present. Treaties, acts and court decisions that reflect these policies will be chronologically analyzed. The last third of the course will include a discussion of contemporary issues and conflicts between and among various Native American tribes and the US government. These contemporary topics will include: land claims, land use, gambling, poverty, religious freedom, and social and environmental policy.
  
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    POS 217 Politics of Global Issues

    Credits: (3)
    This course explores contemporary global issues from the perspective of the state system. Global trends that result from political, military, economic, environmental, and social forces will be analyzed in their impact on and relationship to the state, inter-governmental organizations, and non-governmental organizations. The degree to which the states and the state system can address these global challenges will be the focus. Human security versus state security will be analyzed on issues including, but not limited to: sustainable development; climate change; international trade; international financial institutions; migration and refugees; human rights; terrorism; weapons of mass destruction; global crime; women’s status; and pandemic disease. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENG 103 .
  
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    POS 230 Women and Politics

    Credits: (3)
    This course will compare and contrast the role of women in politics in the US, Western Europe and a selection of countries from the less-developed world. The suffrage movement and ERA movements will be examined for their successes and failures and compared to similar political movements in the west. Women as political actors will be studied: as voters; as party members; as interest group members; as legislators; and as executives in the U.S., Europe and the developing world. The effect that women in office have on policy-making will be evaluated in different regions. A brief survey of how certain public policies affect women will be covered, as will U.N. efforts in the area of international women’s rights.
  
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    POS 260 New York State Environmental Regulation

    Credits: (3)
    This course surveys environmental regulatory management in New York state. Included are historical efforts, present procedures, and some developing trends. The primary focus of the course is on programs of the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation. In addition to NYS DEC programs, the course will examine agencies’ regulatory jurisdictions at the federal, state, and local levels. Various local approvals will also be considered. The emphasis will be on the inter-relationship of programs, as well as the specific details of the NYS DEC programs themselves.
  
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    POS 280 Internship in Politics and Government

    Credits: (3)
    The course provides students the opportunity to apply their knowledge of politics and government in a practical setting. Internships are available in various public offices in the executive/bureaucratic, legislative, or judicial branches of government at the national, state, and local levels. Internships with major political parties may also be available. Students arrange their placement with the help of a faculty coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 120 hours of work, maintaining a weekly journal, attendance at four on-campus seminars, occasional readings, and an experience-based essay. Two on-site evaluations will also be made by the faculty coordinator. Letter grade will be awarded. No credit given for past work experience. Prerequisite(s): Any POS course, and approved Political Science coordinator and on-site supervisor.
  
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    POS 290 Senate and Assembly Internship

    Credits: (9)
    Senate and Assembly internships are available on a competitive basis for outstanding sophomores. Applicants are screened by a selection committee in Albany after approval by the Campus Liaison Officer. The program begins in early January with a week-long orientation to the operation of the state government, with particular reference to the workings of the Legislature. Interns then receive full-time intern assignments for 30+ hours per week in an office of a NYS Assembly or Senate member. Office tasks involve constituent work, research on specific legislation, research on the legislative process, representation of the office at campaign and legislative events, and office administration. On-site supervisors are either members of the Legislature (Senate or Assembly), or members of their staff. A work plan and a learning contract are developed between the intern and supervisor, and intern performance is evaluated regularly. A stipend is available for housing in Albany. Prerequisite(s): POS 100  or POS 102 , or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): POS 291 
  
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    POS 291 Senate and Assembly Research and Seminar

    Credits: (6)
    Senate and Assembly internships are available on a competitive basis for outstanding sophomores. Applicants are screened by a selection committee in Albany after approval by the Campus Liaison Officer. The program begins in early January with a week-long orientation to the operation of state government. After placement in a NYS Senate or Assembly office, interns participate in weekly seminars exploring how politics influences policy in the NYS legislative process. Critical issues that challenge NYS will be used as models for understanding the complexities of the policy-making process. The various actors involved in policy-making, in particular, the legislators, the governor, state agencies, citizens, lobbyists, and the media, are analyzed. Interns receive academic guidance and support from the permanent program staff, the professors in residence, and from legislative staff. This guidance allows students to maximize their understanding of the practical application of the theoretical concepts introduced in the seminar. A stipend is available for housing in Albany. Prerequisite(s): POS 100  or POS 102 , or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): POS 290 

Physical Education, Sport and Leisure

  
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    PSL 210 Team Sports: Teaching and Officiating

    Credits: (2PE)
    An in-depth study of individual skills, rules, and strategy in the following sports: soccer, basketball, volleyball, softball. This course gives students hands-on experience teaching their peers sport-specific skills and drills along with practice at officiating in each sport. There is a dress code for this course. Prerequisite(s): Physical Education and Exercise Science Studies majors or permission of instructor.

Psychology

  
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    PSY 103 General Psychology

    Credits: (3)
    Designed to give the student an introduction to the concepts required for the study of perception, conditioning, learning, intelligence, motivations, emotions, and personality. The interaction of heredity and environment is also stressed. Prerequisite to all other psychology courses.
  
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    PSY 204 Child Psychology

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the scientific study of the developing child. The age span covered ranges from the prenatal period up to puberty. Topics include age relevant studies of motor, cognitive, linguistic, social and personality growth. Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 .
  
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    PSY 205 Social Psychology

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the area of human social interaction from the perspective of how humans affect and are affected by social phenomena. Social factors in the development of personality and motivation, attitudes and attitude change, interpersonal and group processes, and the application of social psychology to contemporary issues will be emphasized. Students will be expected to critically evaluate the explanatory models used to describe, explain, and predict social behavior. Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 .
  
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    PSY 206 Human Growth and Development

    Credits: (3)
    Human growth and psychological development of the individual from infancy through senescence. Attention is given to the patterns of change that occur during each of the life stages, considering physiological, psychological, genetic and cultural forces affecting human development. Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 .
  
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    PSY 207 Adolescent Psychology

    Credits: (3)
    The purpose of the course is to give students an understanding of the issues and concerns associated with the adolescent period. Some of the topics covered include: physical development, cognitive changes, sexuality, peer relationships, drug use, delinquency, and teenage pregnancy. Students will gain an understanding of the issues confronting adolescents and what impacts decisions adolescents make. Theoretical emphasis is placed upon the interaction between environment and heredity in explaining adolescent’s new awareness of issues that concern them. Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 .
  
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    PSY 210 Abnormal Psychology

    Credits: (3)
    Deals with the important aspects of “abnormal psychology”, both from a descriptive as well as a theoretical viewpoint. In addition to noting the various symptoms and characteristics of psychological disorders, an emphasis will be placed on explaining the possible causes of such disorders and their possible methods of treatment. Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 .
  
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    PSY 212 Psychology of Women

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the theories and research concerning the psychology of women, including research on sex roles (sex differences and similarities), female identity formation, and how gender is represented by media and language in our culture. It will include topics such as sexism and feminism, as well as contemporary women’s issues related to mental health, relationships, education, work, and family. Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 .
  
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    PSY 214 Educational Psychology

    Credits: (3)
    An investigation into the ways in which psychological knowledge can be applied to the processes of bringing about changes in behavior, i.e., teaching and learning. The educational implications of psychological theory and research will be applied to such areas as the processes involved in learning, remembering, thinking, solving problems, motivation, and creativity. In considering these areas the focus will be on understanding learning, and the differentiation among learners and learning environments, so that appropriate strategies may be created to enable students to better define themselves as learners. Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 .
  
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    PSY 215 Mind and Body: Physiological Psychology

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the interrelationships between mind and body, exploring the physiological correlates of behavior as well as psychosomatic illness. Students will explore and critically evaluate the theories and research in physiology and their implications. Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 .
  
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    PSY 216 Psychology and Law: Forensic Psychology

    Credits: (3)
    An exploration of the issues and dilemmas created by the interaction between psychology and the law. Current psychological research and theory will be applied to evaluating the uses and abuses of the insanity defense; understanding, predicting and regulating violent behavior; the role of the psychologist as expert witness in civil and criminal cases; the application of psychological research to jury selection, trial techniques and the evaluation of evidence. Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 .
  
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    PSY 218 Psychology of Disabilities

    Credits: (3)
    This course will address factors that influence the adjustment of individuals with disabilities. Definitions of who is an individual with a disability, historical and cultural attitudes towards those individuals, and reactions of family members to the disabilities are explained. Included in the discussion are the laws affecting individuals with disabilities, including the Americans with Disabilities Act and Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 .
  
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    PSY 220 Cognitive Psychology

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the study of cognitive processes. Covered topics include attention, perception, memory, problem solving, concept formation, decision-making and language. Students will critically analyze the research in cognitive psychology and relate the course content to real-world applications. Prerequisite(s): PSY 103 .

Physical Therapist Assistant

  
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    PTA 101 Introduction to Rehabilitation

    Credits: (2)
    The American Physical Therapy Association and the history of the profession of physical therapy (PT) are explored. The student is introduced to procedures used in PT, settings where PT is practiced, and the physical therapist assistant’s role as part of the rehabilitation team. Legal considerations in physical therapy are also introduced. Communication skills are developed, including effective interpersonal communication, oral and written reports and medical terminology. Infection control techniques and various emergency procedures pertinent to the practice of PT will be learned. The student is required to become CPR certified for Basic Life Support (BLS) on an independent basis. Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the PTA program or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 102 , PTA 102L , PTA 107 , and PTA 108  , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 102 Physical Therapy Procedures I

    Credits: (2)
    The theory and practice of physical therapy procedures are begun, including patient positioning and handling techniques, skin care, heat, cold, hydrotherapy treatments and massage. Ambulation with assistive devices, transfers, activities of daily living skills and wheelchair prescription and use are taught. The theory, effects, contraindications and safety precautions of these treatments are learned. Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the PTA program or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 101 , PTA 102L , PTA 107 , and PTA 108  , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 102L Physical Therapy Procedures I Lab

    Credits: (2)
    Skills of PTA 102  are practiced in this course. Students will master entry level skills on patient positioning and handling techniques, heat, cold, and hydrotherapy treatments, and massage. Students will become proficient with ambulation using assistive devices and patient transfer techniques. Activities of daily living skills, use of adaptive equipment, and wheelchair prescription and use will also be learned. Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the PTA program or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 101 , PTA 102 , PTA 107 , and PTA 108  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 104 Physical Therapy Procedures II

    Credits: (2)
    This course presents the principles, theory, effects and contraindications of forms of electrotherapy, deep heat modalities, ultraviolet and traction. Mechanisms of injury and the healing process are taught. Theory and principles of passive range of motion and therapeutic exercise are introduced. Theory of peripheral joint mobilization and stretching is discussed. Basic assessment and treatment of musculoskeletal injuries are introduced and discussed. Prerequisite(s): PTA 101 , PTA 102 , PTA 102L , PTA 107 , and PTA 108 , or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 104L , PTA 105 , and PTA 109 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 104L Physical Therapy Procedures II Lab

    Credits: (3)
    Students master entry level skills of application of various forms of electrotherapy, deep heat modalities, ultraviolet and traction. Students become proficient in selecting and executing passive range of motion and therapeutic exercises. Students are familiarized with the practical application of joint mobilization and stretching of the limbs. Prerequisite(s): PTA 101 , PTA 102 , PTA 102L , PTA 107 , and PTA 108 , or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 104 , PTA 105 , and PTA 109 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 105 Functional Anatomy I

    Credits: (3)
    This course applies principles of anatomy to the study of human motion. This course emphasizes the positioning and procedures for muscle testing and goniometry of the lower extremities, and describes the physiology of muscle contraction. The origins, insertions, actions, innervation and palpations of various muscles of the lower extremities will be learned, in addition to landmarks of the skeletal system. Normal and abnormal posture and gait are studied. A laboratory component is required. 2 classroom hours and 2 laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite(s): PTA 101 , PTA 102 , PTA 102L , PTA 107 , and PTA 108  or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 104 , PTA 104L , and PTA 109  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 106 Clinical Training II

    Credits: (2)
    In the clinical setting, the student applies newly acquired concepts and skills from PTA 104  and PTA 105  and refines skills learned in PTA 102  and PTA 102L . Prerequisite(s): PTA 101 , PTA 102 , PTA 102L , and 103 or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 104 , PTA 104L , and PTA 105  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 107 Physics for the Physical Therapist Assistant

    Credits: (2)
    An introductory course to cover topics in physics specifically related to the physical therapist assistant curriculum concepts. Topics that are covered include energy, mechanics, forces, simple machines, conservation laws, properties of liquids, temperature & heat, and electromagnetic principles. Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the PTA program, or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 101 , PTA 102 , PTA 102L , and PTA 108 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 108 Topics in Geriatric Physical Therapy

    Credits: (1)
    This course is an introduction to the physical therapy management of individuals in the geriatric population. The student learns theory related to the special rehabilitation considerations of the older adult patient/client. Assignments are designed to allow students to acquire skills that are necessary in the geriatric clinical setting. Ethical considerations in physical therapy are introduced. Patient monitoring including vital signs, catheters, and lines pertinent to the practice of physical therapy will be learned. Prerequisite(s): Acceptance into the PTA program or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 101 , PTA 102 , PTA 102L , and PTA 107 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 109 Clinical Training I

    Credits: (1)
    This course is an introduction to the physical therapy department of a clinical facility. Clinical assignments are designed to allow students to observe, assist and acquire skills in application of procedures studied in PTA 101 , PTA 102 , PTA 102L , PTA 107 , and PTA 108 . Prerequisite(s): PTA 101 , PTA 102 , PTA 102L , PTA 107 , and PTA 108 , or permission of Instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 104 , PTA 104L , PTA 105 , and 105L, or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 110 Clinical Training II

    Credits: 2
    In the clinical setting, the student applies concepts and skills acquired from PTA 104 and 105 and refines skills learned in PTA 102 and PTA 102L.  Prerequisite(s): PTA 104 , PTA 104L , PTA 105 , PTA 108 , and  PTA 109 . Co-requisite(s): PTA 201  and PTA 207 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 201 Physical Therapy Procedures III

    Credits: (4)
    This course applies interventions used in Procedures I and II and applies them to specific age groups and pathologies. It studies the pathology, signs, symptoms, psycho-social factors and P.T. management of disabilities related to pediatric and developmental disabilities, strokes, spinal cord injury, fractures, osteoporosis and amputation. It teaches the PTA student how to train patients in the use of an orthosis or prosthesis. Prerequisite(s): PTA major and PTA 104 , PTA 104L , PTA 105 , and PTA 109 , or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 201L, 110, and PTA 207 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 203 Physical Therapy Procedures IV

    Credits: (3)
    This is the study of additional disabilities that may require PT interventions as in PTA 201 . These include the pathology, signs, symptoms, psychosocial factors and physical therapy management of burns, neuromuscular diseases, traumatic head injuries, diabetes, cancer, cardiopulmonary disease, visual and auditory impairments, and obstetrics. Prerequisite(s): PTA 110, PTA 201 , and PTA 207 , or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 204  and PTA 208 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 204 Seminar

    Credits: (3)
    This course explores the topic of death and dying, including the bereavement process, support systems for the grieving person, and ethical, legal, and cultural implications for the Physical Therapist Assistant. Multicultural Diversity and its impact on healthcare delivery is explored. Topics of research, quality assurance, risk management, ergonomics, complementary alternative medicine, work hardening, and functional capacity evaluations are presented. Domestic violence and sexual harassment and their implication to the Physical Therapist Assistant are discussed. Additional pathology topics including the obesity epidemic, rheumatology, hemophilia, GI, and endocrine systems, along with multiple system disorders are covered. Evaluative procedures such as diagnostic imaging, lab values, arterial blood gas interpretation, and pharmacology and their implications to Physical Therapist Assistants are introduced. Prerequisite(s): PTA major and PTA 110, PTA 201 , and PTA 207 , or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 203  and PTA 208 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 205 Advanced Clinical Training I

    Credits: (4)
    Under direct supervision of a registered physical therapist or physical therapist assistant, the student will be able to synthesize acquired concepts and skills from the previous levels of clinical and didactic training. Prerequisite(s): PTA 201  and PTA 207 .
  
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    PTA 206 Advanced Clinical Training II

    Credits: (4)
    Under direct supervision of a registered physical therapist or physical therapist assistant, the student will be able to synthesize acquired concepts and skills from the previous levels of clinical and didactic training. The clinical experience follows the completion of all required physical therapy courses. Prerequisite(s): PTA 203 , PTA 204 , PTA 205 , and PTA 208 , or permission of instructor; PTA majors only.
  
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    PTA 207 Functional Anatomy II

    Credits: (3)
    A continuation of PTA 105 , this course includes body landmarks, origins, insertions, actions, and innervation of the upper extremity, head, neck and trunk, ascending and descending nerves, cranial nerves and autonomic nervous system. Goniometry and muscle testing, and palpation of individual muscles will be learned on the upper extremity and trunk. Course consists of 2 classroom hours and 1 laboratory hour. Prerequisite(s): PTA major and PTA 104 , PTA 104L , PTA 105 , and PTA 109  Co-requisite(s): PTA 110 and PTA 201 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    PTA 208 Seminar II: Strategies for Success

    Credits: (2)
    This course synthesizes knowledge gained from each course taken within the PTA curriculum to better prepare the graduate for entry level career positions. The student will learn how to organize and review the vast amounts of material that have been presented to them in the PTA curriculum. The student will undergo a collegial-level review process, log formative feedback, and self-reflect to identify learning needs and individual weaknesses regarding content of PTA courses and the NPTE-PTA exam. This course is geared towards preparing the student to successfully complete the National Physical Therapist Assistant Exam (NPTE) and navigate various forms and fees required for certification in New York State. Prerequisite(s): PTA major and PTA 110, PTA 201 , and PTA 207 , or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): PTA 203  and PTA 204 .

Recreation Leadership

  
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    REC 102 Activity Planning I

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides students with opportunities to develop, lead, organize, and evaluate games and activities for elementary- to middle school-aged participants. Behavior management strategies are emphasized as they apply to the developmental stages of the population being served. Students are required to compose lesson plans with outcome objectives and develop safety plans based on risk assessment. On- and off-campus experiences in activity leadership are required. Prerequisite(s): EXR majors or permission of instructor.

Science

  
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    SCI 100 Meteorology

    Credits: (3)
    This is an introductory meteorology course designed to conceptually explore the principles and processes of weather. Students will study the fundamental principles of atmospheric structure and composition, radiation and energy as they relate to the Earth-Atmosphere system, air temperature, atmospheric moisture, and air pressure. The course investigates processes that cause fog, clouds, and precipitation. Students are provided with a detailed study of wind and pressure systems around the world, as well as middle latitude and tropical weather phenomena such as air masses, cyclones, tornadoes and hurricanes. Satisfies the science elective requirement of the Math/Science curriculum and also satisfies the science requirement of those curricula which require science. Three class hours or equivalent per week.
  
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    SCI 100L Meteorology Lab

    Credits: (1)
    This optional lab course is designed to increase the students’ understanding of meteorology and dynamic characteristics of the atmosphere covered in SCI 100 Meteorology , by challenging them with conceptual and mathematical analyses and interpretation exercises. It should be taken concurrently with SCI 100  or in a subsequent semester upon successful completion of that lecture course. It is intended for those who want a deeper understanding of meteorology and/or those students who have a laboratory science requirement to satisfy. Prerequisite(s): MAT 087  or higher Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): SCI 100 . One two-hour laboratory session per week.
  
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    SCI 103 Introductory Astronomy

    Credits: (3)
    The Universe: the solar system, stars, galaxies, and cosmology are examined in the light of continuing discoveries of modern astronomy in the space age. Satisfies the science elective requirement of the Math/Science curriculum and also satisfies the science requirement of those curricula which requires science. Three class hours or equivalent per week.
  
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    SCI 103L Astronomy Lab

    Credits: (1)
    Laboratory exercises emphasizing practical astronomy. Intended for those who wish to deepen their understanding of astronomy and/or those who have a laboratory science requirement to satisfy. Prerequisite(s): MAT 079  or higher Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): SCI 103 . One three-hour session per week.
  
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    SCI 104 The Solar System

    Credits: (3)
    This course calls upon most of the physical sciences, and uses basic mathematical principles in an attempt to understand the origin and nature of our solar system, as well as planetary systems around other stars. Students will study the planets, natural satellites, comets, and asteroids in our solar system and their origins. Additionally, extrasolar planets will be examined. This course emphasizes the methods of planetary science as well as a descriptive view of the topics. This course also satisfies the science requirement for those curricula that require science.  Prerequisite(s): MAT 084  or higher, or permission of instructor.
  
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    SCI 104L The Solar System Lab

    Credits: (1)
    This laboratory course provides practical hands-on experience in a variety of disciplines involved in planetary science. The laboratory exercises in this laboratory course will include, but are not limited to: modeling of the formation and evolution of planetary systems, calculation of planetary motion and other small body objects in the solar system, determining the relative ages of features on planetary surfaces, determining conditions on other planetary bodies in the solar system, and determining the conditions and evaluating the possible habitability of exo-planetary systems. This course is intended for those who wish to have a deeper understanding of the field of Planetary Science and/or have a laboratory science requirement to satisfy. This laboratory science course satisfies the science elective requirement of the Math/Science Curriculum and also satisfies the science requirement for those curricula that require science. Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): SCI 104  and MAT 084  or higher, or permission of instructor. It is one three-hour session per week.
  
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    SCI 111 Introduction to Physics and Chemistry

    Credits: (4)
    An introductory survey course in physics and chemistry for non-science majors. Topics covered include: scientific method, motion, energy, momentum, heat, light, electricity, sound, atomic structure, the periodic table, chemical compounds, chemical bonds, chemical reactions, properties of water, acids, bases, and salts. Prerequisite(s): MAT 087  or higher. Three class hours and two laboratory hours. Not open to Math/Science majors.

Surgical Technology

  
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    SGT 101 Introduction to Surgical Technology

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the field of surgical technology. Includes the study of medical legal aspects, ethical conduct, hospital policies, and preparations for the care of the surgical patient. Also includes clinical orientation sessions in the operating room setting at various hospitals in the community. Prerequisite(s): SGT major; co-requisites: SGT 102 , SGT 103 , and SGT 103L .
  
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    SGT 102 Surgical Pharmacology

    Credits: (1)
    Studies dosage equivalents and terminology, proper procedures for handling intra-operative drugs, principles of drug usage, and the principles and effects of anesthesia administration. Prerequisite(s): SGT major Co-requisite(s): SGT 101 , SGT 103 , and SGT 103L .
  
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    SGT 103 Principles of Surgical Technology

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to surgical services and aseptic techniques. Topics will include: instrumentation, suture types and technique, scrubbing and preparing the sterile field, types of instruments, and uses of other operating room equipment. Prerequisite(s): SGT major Co-requisite(s): SGT 101 , SGT 102 , and SGT 103L .
  
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    SGT 103L Principles of Surgical Technology Lab

    Credits: (2)
    A lab to complement SGT 103 Principles of Surgical Technology . The student will be introduced to the techniques and equipment that are an integral part of his/her training as a Surgical Technologist. Prerequisite(s): SGT major Co-requisite(s): SGT 101 , SGT 102 , and SGT 103 .
  
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    SGT 105 Clinical Practice I

    Credits: (5)
    Clinical application of basic surgical technology procedures. Includes the preparation of equipment and the practice of passing instruments and sutures during actual surgical procedures. Prerequisite(s): SGT 101 , SGT 102 , SGT 103 , and SGT 103L , and BIO 171 .
  
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    SGT 111 Surgical Procedures

    Credits: (5)
    This is a course detailing surgical procedures and the part the surgical technologist plays. Common surgical procedures are explained for each major body system. The student learns how to assist the physician during each specific procedure. Prerequisite(s): SGT 101 , SGT 102 , SGT 103 , SGT 103L , a C+ or higher in BIO 171 , and a C+ or higher in BIO 111  or BIO 205 .
  
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    SGT 115 Clinical Practice II

    Credits: (6)
    A continuation of SGT 105 . More advanced application of clinical procedures in the operating room. Prerequisite(s): SGT 105  and SGT 111 , and BIO 172 .

Sociology

  
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    SOC 103 Introductory Sociology

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a foundational introduction to the broad range of topics encompassed in the “science of society.” Students will learn how to study society with sociological methodologies and how to interpret it with sociological theories and thinking. Students will furthermore explore major sociological topics such as social and economic inequality, gender and sex, the structures of family and human societies, race and ethnicity, religion, socialization processes, and forms of deviance and culture. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 183 Popular Culture

    Credits: (3)
    This course presents a sociological analysis of popular culture. Students examine the role of popular culture in society using sociological theories, methods and concepts. The course will further examine how the nature of popular culture is shaped by mass media organizations and how popular culture, in turn, shapes mass media, our perceptions of self, others, and many aspects of society. Students explore various facets of popular culture, such as print media, radio, television, films, advertising, sports, and popular music. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 203 Gender & Society

    Credits: (3)
    This course offers a sociological analysis of sex and gender relations in contemporary societies. One of the primary objectives of this course is to give students a foundation in sociological ways of thinking about gender in their everyday lives. We will consider how schools, the media, workplaces, families and other social institutions produce, maintain, and enforce gendered behavior and inequality. Further, we will examine the social construction of gender, cross-cultural variations in gender and the intersection of gender with race, class, ethnicity, and sexual orientation. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 204 Social Problems

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to contemporary social problems in the United States from a sociological perspective. Students will learn how to analyze social problems using both sociological research methods and theories. The problems under study in this course include, but are not limited to, poverty and unemployment, race and ethnic conflicts, domestic and relationship violence, drug use and abuse, homelessness and housing issues, crime and criminality, and environmental issues. The evolution of such problems will be considered, as will solutions to their ongoing persistence. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 207 Sociology of Deviance

    Credits: (3)
    This course is concerned with the social construction of social deviance as well as the forces that construct, change, and control forms of deviance in society. We will examine various topics from contemporary and historical contexts, including but not limited to crime, delinquency, drug use and abuse, sexual and relationship deviance, social protest and political deviance, cults and religious deviance, and all sorts of counter-cultural social thought, movements and action. Students will learn how to apply and evaluate research methods used by social scientists to study deviance. In addition, students will learn how to evaluate forms of deviance with various sociological theories such as anomie/strain theory, differential association, labeling constructivist perspectives, and conflict and control theories. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 208 Social Stratification

    Credits: (3)
    Social stratification refers to systematic, patterned inequality in the access and distribution of opportunities, rewards and resources across social categories. Students will learn about the sociological approaches to understanding social stratification and inequality and the processes by which various statuses across the stratification spectrum come to be seen as undesirable, legitimate, or natural. This course focuses on industrialized societies, but does not preclude comparison to other economic systems and societies across the globe. Furthermore, the course addresses major forms of social stratification through a historical lens, especially those related to age, class, race, gender, and various social statuses related to work, privilege, wealth, politics and power. The course examines whether forms of stratification are inevitable, the relationship of industrialization and deindustrialization to stratification, and whether theories of a ruling class are well founded in post-industrial capitalism. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 209 Medical Sociology

    Credits: (3)
    This course presents a conceptual overview of medical sociology, sometimes referred to as the sociology of health and illness. Students examine a variety of social and cultural forces that affect illness, disparities in health, and access to healthcare. Students learn the major concepts, methods, and theories that medical social scientists use to understand public trends and topics in health, illness, and medicine. Furthermore, students will examine various medical topics from sociological and cross-cultural perspectives, including but not limited to medical ethics, death and dying processes, the work environments and careers of health professionals, the commodification of illness, healthcare systems and reform, and the intersection of inequalities as they relate to health, illness, and access to healthcare. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 211 Race and Ethnicity

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to the processes by which race and ethnic meanings (identities, cultures, racism, prejudices, etc.) have been and continue to be constructed. In addition, this course examines the major social consequences of racial meanings, including but not limited to discriminatory social policy, segregations, racial inequalities, and ethnic conflicts. While this course focuses on the U.S., students will study and compare race and ethnic meanings across regions and nations. There are important racial and ethnic distinctions across geographies, and comparing them allows students to understand the complexities of racial and ethnic meanings. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 213 International Development

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to the major sociological perspectives of international and comparative development, sometimes called globalization and social change or global development. It examines and compares the processes and conflicts of development across various international regions. It focuses on the relationship of development to regional economies, ecologies, food/land/income distribution, demographic shifts, and quality of life measures. This course examines the positions of the promoters of development, including post-WWII institutions of development (the World Trade Organization, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund). This course also considers the positions of social movements and resisters to development. Related topics to be studied include the influence of states on development, the intersection of resistance to development and religion, the role of multinational corporations on development, as well as prospects and tensions surrounding democratization. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 214 Global Inequality

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides a foundation for understanding social and economic inequality on a global level. Students will study and compare the causes and solutions to inequality issues across various communities in both developed and underdeveloped nations. Issues to be covered include hunger, modern slavery, human and indigenous rights, disease, human trafficking, ethnic violence, homelessness and displacement, and unemployment and labor issues. Students will consider solution models to inequality issues from various perspectives including religious, governmental, philanthropic, not-for-profit, and non-governmental organizations. Students will receive training in the sociological research methods used to measure and understand global inequities. Prerequisite(s): English and reading level placement at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 215 Sports in Society

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines sports using the sociological perspective, objectively and systematically applying sociological concepts, methods and theories to better understand sport and its social meanings. The structural and cultural relationship of sports to society will be explored, paying particular attention to the issues of race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, social class, age, economics, and politics. The course will also explore how sports is a microcosm of society and parallels other social institutions such as the media, family, and schools. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 220 Sociology of Work

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides an introduction to the sociology of work and labor. It will carefully consider the meaning of types of work and how those meanings change and develop over time. This course examines the social and economic forces that transform work and how such transformation affects social development. Many issues related to work and employment will be considered including, but not limited to: global fair labor standards, tensions between labor and environmental justice, automation’s impact on skill, professionalization, unemployment, unions and unionization, high-paid and low-paid employment, the minimum wage, the impacts of employment types on family life, human trafficking and modern slavery, migrant worker movements, labor social movements, sweatshops and offshoring, and globalization and outsourcing. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    SOC 230 Environmental Sociology

    Credits: (3)
    Environmental sociology examines the interrelationships between society and the natural environment. This course is designed to provide an overview of environmental problems, to examine the underlying social causes and consequences of environmental change, and to critically evaluate these using the dominant theories in the field. Broadly, this course will consider the impacts of population, consumption, production, and development on the environment. In addition, it will consider the cultural understanding of environmental concern, environmental domination and risk. Finally, the course will consider how to apply the ideas of environmental sociology to develop solutions to social and environmental problems.

Spanish

  
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    SPA 101 Elementary Spanish I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of Spanish. Students acquire basic grammar and lexical skills that will enable them to communicate in routine social or professional situations within an authentic cultural context. Topics may include, but are not limited to the following: biographical information, relationships, preferences, leisure activities and making plans for the future. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC. Upon successful completion of SPA 101, students may enroll in SPA 102 .
  
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    SPA 102 Elementary Spanish II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a sequel to Elementary Spanish I. It builds upon the basic grammatical, linguistic, communicative and cultural concepts learned in SPA 101 . Students learn to communicate in the context of an increasing number of daily life topics. Topics may include, but are not limited to the following: homes, daily routines, urban and commercial contexts, clothing and other belongings, health and emergencies, and the workplace. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC. Upon successful completion of SPA 102, students may enroll in SPA 201 . Prerequisite(s): SPA 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    SPA 165 Spanish for Advanced Beginners

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed for students with some experience in Spanish who feel they need a comprehensive review of the basic grammatical, linguistic and communicative structures covered in elementary-level courses prior to taking an intermediate level course. Upon successful completion of SPA 165, students may enroll in SPA 201 . This course also fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at Onondaga. Students may not receive credit for both SPA 102  and SPA 165. Prerequisite(s): three years of high school Spanish, or equivalent.
  
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    SPA 201 Intermediate Spanish I

    Credits: (3)
    This intermediate-level course builds upon the grammatical, linguistic, communicative and cultural skills previously learned at the introductory level. Students acquire more complex grammar and lexical skills that will enable them to communicate within a greater range of contexts. Topics are set within the Spanish-speaking world and may include: Hispanics in the US, Spanish-speaking Civilizations, The Arts, and Leisure. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC. Upon successful completion of SPA 201, students may enroll in SPA 202 .
  
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    SPA 202 Intermediate Spanish II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a sequel to Intermediate Spanish I. Students acquire increasingly complex grammatical, linguistic, communicative and cultural skills that will enable them to communicate in a greater range of situations within an authentic cultural context. Relevant topics to the Spanish-speaking world discussed in this course may include: Food, Relationships, Social Issues, The Environment, and Technology and Globalization. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC. Upon successful completion of SPA 202, students may enroll in SPA 204  or SPA 220 .
  
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    SPA 204 Spanish Literature: An Introduction

    Credits: (3)
    At an intermediate-high level, this course will introduce students to literary concepts and literature from around the Spanish-speaking world. Intensive work in conversation and composition. Solid preparation in grammar recommended. Class conducted entirely in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): SPA 202  or equivalent.
  
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    SPA 220 Spanish Communication Through Cinema

    Credits: (3)
    This course will focus on the linguistic and cultural diversity of the Spanish-speaking world as represented in the cinema. It includes intensive work in conversation and composition. Solid preparation in grammar is recommended. This class is conducted entirely in Spanish. Prerequisite(s): SPA 202  or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

Sustainability Studies

  
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    SUS 101 Introduction to Sustainability

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to a wide variety of Earth Systems concepts and provides sufficient background knowledge so that students can interpret and intelligently discuss sustainability issues. Students will explore how today’s human societies can endure in the face of global change, ecosystem degradation, and resource limitations. Key knowledge areas of sustainability theory and practice include permaculture, population, ecosystems, global change, energy, agriculture, water, environmental economics and policy, ethics, and cultural history.

Women's Studies

  
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    WMS 101 Introduction to Women’s and Gender Studies

    Credits: (3)
    The field of Women’s and Gender Studies employs an interdisciplinary approach to analyzing the experiences of women and other marginalized groups. This introductory course examines the social construction of gender and its effect on cross-cultural, historical, political and literary contexts. Readings and discussions position race, class, sexuality and other categories of identity in relation to gender. While the course focuses on the United States, at times the course will investigate gender relations from global and transnational feminist perspectives.

Writing and Reading

  
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    WRD 098 Writing and Reading in the Disciplines

    Credits: (3EQ)
    This course will practice the kinds of writing and reading expected in the content curriculum as well as in ENG 103  while providing students a chance to satisfy their ENG 099  and ILS 093  requirements. By the end of the course students will become better readers and better editors of their own work and reduce sentence level errors. Students will also demonstrate effectiveness in reading and comprehension of textbook reading assignments. Finally, students will develop strategies for addressing and overcoming affective issues that are potential barriers to success in college, developing better relationships with writing and reading. Collaboration between the WRD instructor and the content instructor will occur periodically. This foundational course provides 3 equivalent credit hours toward a full-time load; it carries 0 credit hours of academic credit. Prerequisite(s): Placement into ENG 099  and/or ILS 093 . Co-requisite(s): Concurrent enrollment into designated content course and designated ENG 103  for the cohort.
 

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