Dec 16, 2018  
College Catalog 2018-2019 
    
College Catalog 2018-2019

Course Descriptions


 

Anthropology

  
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    ANT 151 Human Origins and Evolution

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a general introduction to the field of physical anthropology, with an emphasis on the causes and evolution of human biological similarities and differences. The course introduces the main perspectives and methods of physical anthropology, paleoanthropology, and primatology in order to help students trace and explain human evolution from the first primates and hominids to the development of bipedalism and the emergence of anatomically modern humans (Homo sapiens).
  
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    ANT 152 Introduction to Cultural Anthropology

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides students with an introduction to the cultural and social systems that humans have devised over time and space, using a comparative anthropological perspective. The course will also focus on using the methods, theories, and concepts of cultural anthropology to understand and explain the cultural diversity seen around the world.
  
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    ANT 154 World Archaeology

    Credits: (3)
    This introductory course discusses the basic philosophy and methods of archaeology, and provides an introductory survey of archaeological excavations and discoveries in the Near East, Africa, Asia, Europe, and the Americas, with an emphasis on understanding how societies changed and developed during the unwritten periods of human history. Beginning with the evolution of the first human ancestors nearly seven million years ago, topics will include the evolution of the earliest human societies, the development of lifeways based on domesticated plants and animals, and the emergence of complex societies. Along the way, students will also have a chance to use archaeological methods to make sense of material remains in their own society.
  
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    ANT 155 Language and Culture

    Credits: (3)
    This is an introductory course in anthropological linguistics and charts how human languages are formed, evolve, and disappear. The main topics will include the nature of human language as distinct from other communication systems; how we organize sound to make a language, i.e. how we identify sound patterns (phonology), create words (morphology), group words into sentences (syntax), and attribute meaning to these sounds (semantics and semiotics); the relationships between language, culture, and human thought; changes in language used in different socio-cultural contexts; and the historical development of languages and writing systems.
  
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    ANT 175 Peoples and Cultures of the World

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides students with a comparative survey of the indigenous peoples and cultures of the modern world, from the late 1800s to the present. Course readings will focus on the ethnographic study of peoples from all major culture areas of the world outside of Europe: Africa, the Middle East, South Asia, Southeast Asia, East Asia, the Pacific Islands and Australia, North America, and South America. Through this class, students will gain a general understanding of world cultures and the utility of ethnography as a means for exploring specific cultures and ethnology as a basis for cross-cultural comparison and comprehension.
  
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    ANT 201 Anthropology of Marriage and the Family

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines marriage, kinship, and family systems in various cultures from around the world using a comparative anthropological approach. Students will gain an understanding of the cultural logics underlying diverse marriage customs, descent patterns, notions of relatedness, and forms of family life found in different parts of the world and within present-day American society.
  
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    ANT 202 Cult Archaeology

    Credits: (3)
    Why does archaeology inspire endless theories about ancient aliens, lost civilizations, apocalyptic predictions, and mysterious technologies? This course seeks to answer this question and introduce students to the realities of archaeology by exploring the weird world of “cult archaeology,” also known as pseudoarchaeology. We will investigate the origins of so-called alternative archaeological theories; look at the types of “evidence” used to create them; and examine the reasons and rationales that lead people to invent, disseminate, and believe them. From the lost city of Atlantis and ancient alien astronauts to Bigfoot and pre-Columbian voyagers to the Americas, we will explore the many different forms of pseudoarchaeology and their impact on modern societies.
  
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    ANT 203 Magic, Witchcraft and Religion

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the nature and evolution of religious beliefs and practices across cultures. Many different cosmologies, mythologies, rituals, and magical systems of thought - such as animism, totemism, witchcraft, sorcery, and shamanism - will be explored from an anthropological perspective. Emphasis will be placed on the religions of indigenous societies and their unique cultural contexts. Students will also consider the role that religion plays in promoting cultural stability and in expressing patterns of cultural change due to colonialism and globalization.

Architectural Technology

  
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    ARH 101 Exploring Sustainability, Design, and The Built Environment

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an exploration of global built environments, with a focus on explaining significant design styles, movements, and trends within the context of the arts, politics, technology, business, the sciences, the social sciences, and an emphasis on sustainability. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course discusses the recent history of design in the built environment - what has impacted it and why. It is part of the three-course foundation for all Architecture and Interior Design students and is also a Liberal Arts elective. Prerequisite(s): ARH/IND major or placement in ENG 103 .
  
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    ARH 110 Foundation Studio 1

    Credits: (4)
    This foundation studio in graphic communications will be used to explore design principles. Freehand and digital techniques will be introduced that help the student appreciate forms, texture and composition. Instruction will be given in pencil techniques, perspective principles, and the use of digital tools. This course will develop the required graphic skills to prepare architecture and interior design students for the next three semesters of course work. This class meets 6 hours per week. Co-requisite(s): ARH 101 /IND 101  and ARH 170  IND 170 .
  
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    ARH 111 Design Studio 2

    Credits: (4)
    Students in this course begin to explore elements of design and their relationships in three dimensional design problems. Design concepts and design process are discussed in detail. Architectural and interior design concepts of space, organizations, circulation, scale, structure, volume, massing, fenestration and materials are analyzed and discussed. This class meets 6 hours per week. Laptop computer required (must meet department standards for software and processing speed). Prerequisite(s): ARH 101 /IND 101 ,ARH 110 /IND 110 , and ARH 170 /IND 170  Co-requisite(s): ARH 120 /IND 120  and ARH 140  IND 140 , or permission of department.
  
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    ARH 120 Drafting Studio 1: Wood Frame

    Credits: (3)
    This course will develop basic architectural drafting skills (digital and manual). The student will demonstrate an understanding of these skills through the development of a set of architectural drawings for a wood frame house or similar structure. This class meets 4 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ARH 101 /IND 101 , ARH 110  IND 110 , and ARH 170  IND 170  Co-requisite(s): ARH 140 /IND 140  or permission of department.
  
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    ARH 121 Drafting Studio 2 Masonry

    Credits: (3)
    Students apply and improve drafting skills by developing architectural working drawings for a small commercial building. Drawing documents include symbol conventions, plans, sections, elevations and details with the emphasis on masonry bearing wall construction. Prerequisite(s): ARH 120 /IND 120   Co-requisite(s): ARH 141  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ARH 140 Wood Frame Construction

    Credits: (3)
    This is a lecture course covering the materials and methods of contemporary residential construction, including sustainability and the latest building science. The characteristics, properties, performance and application of materials and systems used in wood frame construction will be discussed.
  
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    ARH 141 Commercial Construction

    Credits: (3)
    This course covers the materials and methods of contemporary commercial construction. This course focuses on site-work, foundations, concrete framing systems, masonry wall systems made of concrete, clay, and stone, steel framing systems, moisture and thermal protection, glass and windows, cladding and curtain walls, doors and hardware. Prerequisite(s): ARH 140 /IND 140 .
  
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    ARH 144 Introduction to Sustainable Construction

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the theory and principles of innovative sustainable construction with a focus on residential construction. The course takes an integrated design and ecological systems approach to high performance green building. Students learn how to reduce the ecological impact of the built environment using cutting-edge best practices. Topics include climate change, green building principles, performance standards and measurement, and rating systems including LEED® for Homes. Cost, life cycle assessment, energy efficiency, renewable energy and solar elements, and valuing “natural capital” will be discussed. Prerequisite:ARH 140  or demonstration of a fundamental knowledge of residential construction or permission of department.
  
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    ARH 170 Technology: Design and Production

    Credits: (3)
    This course will develop the technology skills required for architecture and interior design students. The students will learn how to create, modify, communicate, collaborate, transmit and present solutions to problems using specific software applications including AutoCAD, SketchUp, ANGEL CMS, and PowerPoint. Co-requisite(s): ARH 101 /IND 101  and ARH 110  IND 110 .
  
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    ARH 215 Design Studio 3

    Credits: (4)
    This is the second design studio for Architectural design. Students are expected to apply knowledge of design concepts and design process to “real-life” design problems. Programming, aesthetics of interior spaces, context, fenestration, materials, furniture, structure, and design development will be explored. Experimentation with space, form, light, and proportion will be stressed. Significant trends in interior and architectural design, as practiced by recent leading interior designers and architects will be discussed. This class meets 6 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ARH 111 /IND 111  or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): ARH 256 /IND 256  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ARH 216 Design Studio 4

    Credits: (4)
    This is the third design studio for Architectural design. This studio is a continuation of ARH 215  and will require in-depth analysis of design problems and higher expectations for design presentations. Students are expected to apply knowledge of design concepts and design process to “real-life” design problems. This class meets 6 hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ARH 215 /IND 215  and ARH 256  IND 256 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    ARH 222 Drafting Studio 3: Steel Frame

    Credits: (4)
    A concentrated continuation of ARH 121  with emphasis on the production of working drawings for steel and concrete frame multistory structures. Prerequisite(s): ARH 121 .
  
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    ARH 230 History of Architecture and Interiors 1

    Credits: (3)
    This is a survey course that traces developments in design, construction, materials and interiors from Prehistory to the dawn of the Renaissance. The comparative method is used to study the impact of economic, religious, political, sociological and technological developments on resultant building types, architectural forms, interior designs, furnishings and decorative arts.
  
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    ARH 231 History of Architecture and Interiors 2

    Credits: (3)
    This is a survey course that traces developments in design, construction, materials and interiors from the dawn of the Renaissance to the present day. The comparative method is used to study the impact of economic, religious, political, sociological and technological developments on resultant building types, architectural forms, interior designs, furnishings and decorative arts.
  
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    ARH 241 Mechanical and Electrical Systems: An Introduction

    Credits: (3)
    Introductory survey of mechanical and electrical systems for buildings. Topics will include heating, ventilating, air conditioning (HVAC), plumbing, fire protection, electrical power, and lighting systems for residential and commercial buildings. Auxiliary electrical systems such as security, public address, fire detection and alarm systems will be briefly discussed. Coordination of these systems with existing architectural plans will be emphasized. Instruction will involve case studies of pre-designed buildings. The primary method of learning and evaluation will be through student prepared drawings. Prerequisite(s): ARH 121 .
  
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    ARH 244 Residential Energy Performance

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a fundamental study of energy efficiency and building science with an emphasis on residential energy performance and analysis. Topics include basic energy principles; building thermal boundary; and the control of air, heat, and moisture. The interaction of building components with environmental factors is essential to the discussion. Efficiency strategies for lighting, appliances, heating, cooling, and water heating will be introduced. Strategies for dealing with home health, air quality, and combustion safety problems will be discussed. Fundamentals of building inspection and diagnosis will be covered, including the use of the blower-door, duct-blaster, manometer, infrared camera, smoke generator and other testing equipment. Students must be available for two four-hour field experiences, times and days to be determined. Prerequisite(s): ARH 140 /ARH 140  or equivalent wood frame construction experience as determined by the Architecture department.
  
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    ARH 245 Solar Design in the Built Environment

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces the design and application of solar energy in building design and construction. The primary focus is on passive solar energy, daylighting and shading strategies. Discussion topics include the historical development of solar energy in buildings, designing with nature, energy conservation, heat theory and thermal comfort, solar processes, passive and active solar energy systems, thermal mass and storage, solariums, natural ventilation strategies and earth-sheltered buildings. Prerequisite(s): ARH 140 /IND 140   Co-requisite(s): ARH 141 .
  
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    ARH 250 Principles of Structures

    Credits: (3)
    Structure as it affects design. A study of the loading of structures and the resistance to those loads as they apply to wood frame and steel frame structures.
  
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    ARH 256 Graphic Communications

    Credits: (3)
    An advanced course in perspective rendering. Students are expected to apply perspective drawing skills acquired in ARH 110 /IND 110  to generate color renderings of building interiors and exteriors. Students taking Architectural Design Studio II are encouraged to take this course concurrently and to use their design solutions as a base for required rendering projects in ARH/IND 256 . Prerequisite(s): ARH 110 /IND 110  or permission of department.
  
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    ARH 261 Professional Practice

    Credits: (3)
    A detailed survey of important aspects of professional practice with emphasis on the architect’s role in society, ethics, licensing, legal instruments, specifications, and contract administration. Prerequisite(s): ARH or IND major and sophomore standing, or permission of department.
  
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    ARH 262 Building Codes

    Credits: (3)
    A detailed analysis of the New York State Building Code.
  
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    ARH 263 Green Building Rating Systems

    Credits: (3)
    This course acquaints the student with rating systems that seek to define and measure sustainable, high performing “green” buildings. The course will focus on the U.S. Green Building Council’s LEED® Green Building Rating System portfolio of rating products and the major LEED® categories including sustainable sites, water efficiency, energy & atmosphere, materials & resources, indoor environmental quality, and innovative design. Students will learn about the integrated design approach and the LEED® process and credit intents, requirements, and strategies. Other significant rating systems will be discussed and comparisons made with the LEED® system. Prerequisite(s): ARH 140 /IND 140  or permission of department.
  
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    ARH 266 Individual Study Project

    Credits: (1)
    Any project suitable for individual or small group self-study, and approved by the department, may be pursued. Student(s) must be highly motivated and self-directive. The instructor will meet weekly with the student(s) and serve as a resource person. A learning contract containing specific educational outcomes that relate to both the project and the field of study is developed between the student(s) and a faculty member. The content of an Individual Study Project must not significantly duplicate material offered in a regularly scheduled course in the department. Open to students who have earned more than 32 credits and have a minimum 3.0 G.P.A. Prerequisite(s): Variable.
  
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    ARH 270 Digital Portfolio for Architecture and Interior Design

    Credits: (1)
    A hands-on course to create a digital portfolio. Students will utilize digital cameras, scanners, image editing software, and CD recording software and hardware to produce a PowerPoint presentation on an autorun CD. Basic computer literacy is required. Prerequisite(s): ARH or IND major with 30 completed credits, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ARH 272 Architectural CAD II

    Credits: (3)
    An intermediate level course in Architectural CAD (Computer Aided Drafting) utilizing 2-1/2 and 3- D software (AutoCAD). Topics include intermediate drawing, editing, and system commands with direct hands on experience, file management and multi-pen plotting. Professional details and drawings will provide the basis for graphic problems and solutions. Prerequisite(s): ARH 170  and ARH 120  (grades of B or better or permission of department).
  
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    ARH 291 Internship in Architecture

    Credits: (1)
    This course is designed for students in their second year of architectural coursework, giving them an opportunity to obtain real-world experience in the design and construction industry. Internships and co-op job opportunities are available throughout the community; however, there is no guarantee of internship placement. The ultimate responsibility for obtaining a placement rests with the student. Assistance is provided by department faculty and Onondaga’s internship office. Internships may be paid or unpaid. A learning contract containing specific educational objectives that relate to both the work experience and academic studies is developed between the student and a faculty internship coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 60 hours of work, maintenance of a work journal, and a final paper. Open to ARH majors only. Prerequisite(s): Approval of department, minimum G.P.A. of 2.5, and sophomore standing.

Art

  
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    ART 101 Drawing I

    Credits: (3)
    Drawing is a basic thinking and visualization tool to any art discipline. The foundation course goes to the core of drawing as making sensitive, well understood and named marks. Its purpose is to lead the student into understanding the intuitive, the visual, and the spoken vocabulary of drawing. Students will realize perceptual values as they relate to conceptual values. The content of the course will be developed through various in-class exercises, projects, and extensive homework assignments.
  
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    ART 102 Drawing II

    Credits: (3)
    This course refines the basic skills learned in ART 101 , Drawing I. Emphasis is placed upon technical proficiency and in-depth exploration of the basic elements of drawing and design. Subject matter will be expanded to include the nude model. Prerequisite(s): C or better in ART 101 .
  
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    ART 103 Design I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a survey and application of the basic principles of 2-dimensional design and composition, and an introduction to the design process and its use in visual problem solving. Students will also receive training in the use of drafting tools, measuring systems, and methods of producing finished work. Students must achieve a grade of C or better in ART 103, Design I, in order to continue in ART 104 , Design II.
  
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    ART 104 Design II

    Credits: (3)
    A continuation and advanced application of the basic 2-dimensional design concepts and processes begun in ART 103 . An introduction to basic 3-dimensional concepts. The course includes a cursory examination of career paths in the field of design and important historical design movements. Prerequisite(s): C or better in ART 103 .
  
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    ART 105 History of Art I

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides a survey of painting, sculpture, and architecture from prehistoric times through the early Renaissance, with a consideration of major societal issues and ideas which may have influenced the development of forms and techniques in the visual arts. Prerequisite(s): ENG 099 or successful completion of the English Competency Exam.
  
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    ART 106 History of Art II

    Credits: (3)
    A continuation of ART 105 , from the high Renaissance to the present. Prerequisite(s): ENG 099 or successful completion of the English Competency Examination.
  
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    ART 109 Principles of Drawing

    Credits: (3)
    Introductory course for non-art majors. An exploratory course that analyzes the components of drawing (line, shape, form, value, transition, texture, tension, balance, composition, etc.) Subject matter varies and may include still-life, landscape, architectural and figurative elements.
  
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    ART 111 Life Drawing Studio

    Credits: (3)
    Life Drawing is an intensive study of basic drawing skills, in keeping with portfolio development for high school students and others interested in advanced studies in the visual arts. The human figure is employed as subject, in the creation of expressive content.
  
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    ART 112 The Practice of Visual Aesthetics

    Credits: (3)
    This is an introductory course for non-art majors exploring the common themes encountered in the visual arts. Students will explore content in the arts through analysis of a wide range of masterworks and apply these studies in creating original artwork. Class time will include lecture, demonstrations, and exploring new mediums for expression.
  
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    ART 114 History of Visual Culture

    Credits: (3)
    This one-semester course provides the understanding necessary for viewing art in a historical and aesthetic context. It is designed for non-majors. Students will also engage in exercises to develop writing and communications skills. A select set of artworks will establish the evolution and cross-cultural synthesis that is the basis of the history of art.
  
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    ART 123 Digital Design for the Non-Designer

    Credits: (3)
    This course offers an introduction to the fundamental design concepts and software techniques used by graphic designers to produce printed communications. Students will achieve a proficiency in the software used for computer aided graphic design as well as in the process of organizing 2-dimensional space. This course may be used as an elective course for non-art majors only. No MAC experience necessary.
  
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    ART 142 Introduction to Computer Graphics

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to graphic design in a digital environment. This course examines industry standard software applications for page layout, illustration, and photo manipulation. Requirement for Graphic Design majors. Open elective.
  
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    ART 152 Color and Concept Development

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the visual thought processes used in the development of creative concepts and ideas, as well as an introduction to color theory and the emotional and spatial behavior of color. Focus is on the conceptual, verbal and technical skills needed to effectively communicate visual ideas.
  
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    ART 200 Portfolio Preparation

    Credits: (1)
    Today’s art world demands a digital presence and an ability to communicate the visual arts electronically. This course will help students learn how to professionally photograph, scan and digitize their visual work. Students will work one-to-one with faculty to develop individually focused and discipline-specific portfolios. It will also model the type of communication that often takes place between artists, galleries, professors, community members and curators. It is recommended that students begin the course with a substantial body of work from a variety of artistic disciplines. This course will focus on sequencing and editing images for inclusion in a final portfolio, portfolio presentation models, and writing artist statements. Students will work to develop a comprehensive visual arts portfolio for submission for transfer applications. By the end of the course, students will have a digital representation of their portfolio to share and build upon in the future. The course is comprised of portfolio editing, written assignments, research, and project development. Prerequisite(s): ART/PHO majors or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 201 Advanced Drawing and Painting I

    Credits: (3)
    Advanced studio experience in drawing and the use of a variety of media. Emphasis is on improving technical skills, compositional sophistication and experimentation with new or multimedia techniques. Individual creativity is encouraged through exploration of a variety of subject possibilities. Prerequisite(s): ART 102  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 202 Advanced Drawing and Painting II

    Credits: (3)
    ART 202 focuses on advanced studio experience in drawing and the use of a variety of media. This class is a continuation of ART 201 , with greater emphasis on self-directed individual creative development. The students will be assigned a term project or series of related works to be produced in consultation with the instructor. Further in-depth exploration and refinement of drawing technique and compositional ability will be stressed. Students will participate in group critiques with other students and guest faculty.
  
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    ART 203 Typography and Layout

    Credits: (3)
    Basic principles of typographic design and typesetting will be studied along with letterforms, their development and present trends. How to select fonts and create a hierarchy of information in design will be emphasized. Student projects will demonstrate how visual layout and typographic composition can be used to communicate ideas. Requirement for Graphic Design Majors.
  
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    ART 204 Intermediate Computer Graphics

    Credits: (3)
    An intermediate-level course for students to develop the skills needed to create and manipulate images. The creative process and industry standard software functions are used to develop and edit images to communicate ideas graphically. Requirement for Graphic Design majors. Prerequisite(s): ART 142 .
  
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    ART 205 Figure Drawing I

    Credits: (3)
    An exploratory drawing course concerned with the human form including the nude model. Emphasis will include the techniques of drawing, use of mediums, and the awareness of anatomical correctness. Skeletal and muscular construction will also be introduced. Prerequisite(s): ART 101  and ART 102  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 206 Figure Drawing II

    Credits: (3)
    Continuation of Figure Drawing I, with further emphasis on anatomical studies. In addition, the syllabus will stress figure work in the area of design (figures in environments, in landscapes, and as part of graphic composition); and in anatomy, a more in-depth concern with spatial movements, volume, and structure.
  
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    ART 211 Introduction to Ceramic Sculpture

    Credits: (3)
    This studio course covers the normal process in sculpting. It will start with three-dimensional axes sketches in wire (prelude to armature construction) through build-up and blocked-in forms for proportion to simplified modeling.
  
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    ART 212 Ceramic Sculpture II

    Credits: (3)
    A studio class continuation of ART 211 , with greater emphasis on more advanced modeling techniques. Emphasis will shift to a concentration of figure in sculpture and working directly from live models.
  
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    ART 213 Painting I

    Credits: (3)
    A studio course concerned with the study of acrylic and/or oil painting medium and its applications to the various techniques of traditional and non-traditional painting. All techniques discussed and demonstrated will be applied to concentrated studio projects. Prerequisite(s): ART 101  and ART 102  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 214 Painting II

    Credits: (3)
    Advanced course in painting with concentrated studio projects and problems involving lighting, spatial and environmental concepts. Students should develop technical understanding of the various components of painting, space, volume, and value, as well as various painting media such as oil, acrylic, watercolor, gauche, encaustic, and graphic design media.
  
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    ART 218 Art in Animation

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the history of animation and hands-on studio experience making a short animated presentation. Students will learn the artistic skills required for computer animation techniques using current animation software.
  
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    ART 219 Ceramics I

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to handbuilding techniques; the exploration of clay as an expressive material through various forming and decorating methods.
  
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    ART 220 Ceramics II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a continuing investigation of techniques including glazes and different kinds of clay mixes. More advanced projects are included.
  
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    ART 221 Modern Art and Its Backgrounds

    Credits: (3)
    A semester-long survey of the forms and techniques of late nineteenth and early twentieth century visual arts, with an examination of their relationships to one another, to past art, and to some of the major issues and ideas of their times.
  
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    ART 224 Design for Multimedia

    Credits: (3)
    This course focuses on the aesthetic and organizational skills required for designing interactive multimedia products. The course content includes the integration of the various elements of text, artwork, photographs, sound, and motion. Topics of discussion will include user interface design, interactivity, information mapping and intuitive navigation design. Prerequisite(s): ART 142  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 225 Watercolor

    Credits: (3)
    A studio course exploring traditional and non-traditional use of watercolor. Subject matter may include still-life, landscape, the nude figure. Prerequisite(s): ART majors or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 226 Ceramic Processes I

    Credits: (3)
    An in-depth ceramics course with emphasis on exploring a variety of production techniques. Pottery processes covered include wheel throwing, slab and coil building, mold design, glaze and clay chemistry, primitive firing and reduction firing. Prerequisite(s): ART major or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 227 Ceramic Processes II

    Credits: (3)
    Studio sequel to ART 226 . Emphasis will shift to the production of a portfolio of related art work making use of previously acquired skills. Prerequisite(s): ART 226  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 240 Advanced Graphic Design

    Credits: (3)
    Practical and theoretical design concepts and their application to advanced communications problems and multi-piece campaigns will be studied. Projects will emphasize concept development and portfolio preparation.
  
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    ART 244 Visual Design for the Web

    Credits: (3)
    Visual design for the web examines the unique opportunities and capabilities of digital electronic art. Emphasis will be placed on the organization and the communication of visual information needed for Web site design. Students will learn how to create and maximize visual assets for Web design. Prerequisite(s): ART 142  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ART 253 Italian Renaissance Art

    Credits: (3)
    This course will examine the painting, sculpture, and architecture produced in Italy from the early Renaissance to Mannerism. Students will focus on master works while paying particular attention to the cultural, political, and societal issues which may have affected the development of artistic forms and techniques of the period. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENG 103 .
  
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    ART 291 Art: Cooperative Education

    Credits: (1)
    Designed to provide work experience directly related to the student’s area of study in art. Internships and co-op job opportunities are available throughout the community. Assistance is provided by department faculty, however, the ultimate responsibility for obtaining a placement rests with the student. A learning contract containing specific education objectives that relate to both the work experience and the field of study is developed between the student and a faculty co-op coordinator.

Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling

  
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    ASA 159 Chemical Dependencies

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides a study of the epidemiological, etiological (genetic factors, nature of addiction) effects of alcohol, tobacco and other drug use and abuse, including: pharmacological, physiological and psychological dimensions of chemical dependency. Emphasis will be placed on the bio-psychosocial model of addiction as it is utilized in chemical dependency intervention, counseling and treatment. An overview of the history of chemical use and abuse will be presented. Basic concepts of toxicology testing and screening will be reviewed.
  
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    ASA 226 Group Skills for Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling

    Credits: (3)
    The emphasis of this course is on group facilitator preparation and training. It presents a variety of theoretical approaches to group techniques applicable to individuals with substance use disorders as well as those experiencing adult child syndrome. The knowledge base will include stages of group development with special emphasis on the skills required of a group facilitator for each developmental stage. Students will practice group techniques and skills through experiential exercises including client screening, interventions, and group techniques designed for or modified for specific populations. Discussions will include managing group processes such as norm development, dealing with reluctance and resistance, support groups and the use of addiction medications. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150 , ASA 159  and ASA 269 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASA 227 Overview of Addiction Services

    Credits: (3)
    This course includes an overview of chemical dependency services including: prevention, intervention, treatment and recovery. The history and theories related to addiction will be discussed. Specific therapy models and approaches including faith based treatment approaches, medication assisted treatment, and non-traditional treatment methods will be presented. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150  and ASA 159 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASA 229 Addictions and Family Systems Treatment Programs

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to provide an in-depth analysis of substance abuse disorders on the family system. The unit of study is the family. Topics include: family system theories, models of family assessment, the intervention process, co-dependency treatment, and family dynamics (i.e. family roles, rules). The influence of a counselor’s personal and professional development (i.e. growing up in a family system affected by a substance use disorder) on the counselor’s professional conduct will be emphasized. Relapse prevention topics are explored, especially how it impacts the family unit. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150  and ASA 159 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASA 268 Clinical Skills for Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counselors

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides instruction and practice in diagnostic criteria, assessment, evaluation, and treatment planning. Various assessment instruments and diagnostic tools for alcoholism and substance abuse treatment will be reviewed with an emphasis on Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) approved screening and assessment instruments. Knowledge regarding the cooperative process of treatment planning, components of a treatment plan, documentation, essential elements of client records and new technologies for producing client records will be covered. Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: HUM 150  and ASA 159 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASA 269 Individual Counseling Skills for Chemical Dependency Counselors

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to provide entry level chemical dependency counselors the basic concepts of substance abuse and addictions counseling, including: terms, models, and ethical issues; substance classifications, effects and associated dangers; assessment, diagnosis, and treatment planning; theoretical approaches, including: motivational interviewing; cognitive behavioral therapy; relapse prevention; and family systems theory. Counseling individuals about the use of addiction medications and vocational related issues will also be explored. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150  and ASA 159 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASA 270 Counselor Spirituality and Wellness

    Credits: (3)
    This course is about the use of spirituality in the field of Human Services, particularly as it relates to wellness. It will introduce students to the difference between spirituality and religion; spiritual assessment, spiritual genogram; death and dying; spirituality, and human services work. The importance of counselor wellness, including: compassion fatigue, burnout, recognition of symptoms, prevention and recover strategies, role of clinical supervision, and counselor impairment. The history, philosophy, principles and practices of mutual aid groups will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150  and ASA 159 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASA 271 Cultural Competence and Special Populations

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to provide students with information regarding special populations with the goal of increasing their ability to understand, communicate, and effectively interact with people across diverse cultures. The course will examine needs and issues related to Alcohol, Tobacco, and Other Drugs (ATOD) prevention and treatment. Special population is defined, but not limited to: race; minority/protected status; ethnicity; gender; age; religion; sexual orientation, co-occurring disorders; veterans; domestic violence; disabilities; etc. Students will develop skills necessary to effectively counsel individuals in the populations discussed in this course. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150  and ASA 159 , or permission of instructor.

American Sign Language

  
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    ASL 100 Beginning American Sign Language I and II

    Credits: (6)
    This course is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of American Sign Language. Students acquire basic grammar and lexical skills that will enable them to communicate in routine social or professional situations within an authentic cultural context. Topics may include, but are not limited to the following: biographical information, relationships, preferences, leisure activities, making plans for the future, daily routines, hobbies, food, clothing and other belongings, health and emergencies, and the workplace. Upon successful completion (C+ or better) of ASL 100, students may enroll in ASL 200 . Students may not receive credit for both this course and ASL 101  and ASL 102 . Prerequisite(s): American Sign Language major or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASL 101 American Sign Language I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of American Sign Language. Students acquire basic grammar and lexical skills that will enable them to communicate in routine social or professional situations within an authentic cultural context. Topics may include, but are not limited to, the following: biographical information, relationships, preferences, leisure activities and making plans for the future. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC. Upon successful completion of ASL 101, students may enroll in ASL 102 .
  
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    ASL 102 American Sign Language II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a sequel to American Sign Language I. It builds upon the basic grammatical, linguistic, communicative and cultural concepts learned in ASL 101 . Students learn to communicate in the context of an increasing number of daily life topics. Topics may include, but are not limited to the following: daily routines, hobbies, food, clothing and other belongings, health and emergencies, and the workplace. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC. Upon successful completion of ASL 102, students may enroll in ASL 201 . Prerequisite(s): ASL 101 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASL 200 Intermediate American Sign Language I and II

    Credits: (6)
    This course is a sequel to ASL 100 . This intermediate-level course builds upon grammatical, linguistic, communicative, and cultural skills that will enable them to communicate in a greater range of situations within an authentic cultural context. Relevant topics to the Deaf community discussed in this course may include: locating objects, discussing money, weather, emergencies, events, future career plans, discussing people, personal experiences, vehicle incidents, and explaining medical situations. Upon successful completion (C+ or better) of ASL 200, students may enroll in ASL 203 . Students may not receive credit for both this course and ASL 201  and ASL 202 . Prerequisite(s): American Sign Language majors and ASL 100  or ASL 102 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASL 201 American Sign Language III

    Credits: (3)
    This dynamic course draws upon previously acquired knowledge while introducing students to more complex grammatical and lexical structures to further develop communicative proficiency and cultural knowledge. This course is conducted mostly in American Sign Language. Upon successful completion of ASL 201, students may enroll in ASL 202 . This course fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at OCC. Prerequisite(s): ASL 102 , 4 years of high school ASL, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASL 202 American Sign Language IV

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a sequel to American Sign Language III. Students develop increasingly complex grammatical, linguistic, communicative, and cultural skills that will enable them to communicate in a greater range of situations within an authentic cultural context. In this course, students will use depiction and discourse strategies to narrate about and to discuss relevant topics to the Deaf community such as people, personal experiences, vehicle incidents, and medical situations. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC. Prerequisite(s): ASL 201 , five years of high school ASL, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASL 203 American Sign Language V

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a sequel to American Sign Language IV. Students develop increasingly more complex grammatical, linguistic, communicative, and cultural skills that will enable them to communicate in a greater range of situations within an authentic cultural context. In this course, students will use depiction and discourse strategies to discuss, narrate, and present on current event topics such as religious celebrations, government and world politics, American historical events, personal life events, and natural disasters. Prerequisite(s): ASL 202  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASL 204 American Sign Language VI

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a sequel to American Sign Language V. This course incorporates advanced American Sign Language (ASL), vocabulary, grammatical features and sophisticated discourse features as it relates to narratives of ASL. It expands upon complex grammatical and lexical structures learned in previous courses. This course gives emphasis to semantics and English idioms for expressing concepts in ASL.  Information based on cultural issues in the Deaf community will continue to be examined. This course is conducted entirely in American Sign Language and provides a solid foundation for advanced study. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at Onondaga.  Prerequisite(s): ASL 203  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASL 206 Processing Skills Development

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to the cognitive processing skills that are components of the process of consecutive and simultaneous interpretation. This course includes an overview of the theoretical models of interpretation, provides skill development activities isolating and integrating interpreting sub-skills, and practice consecutive interpreting activities to lay the foundation for interpretation between American Sign Language and English. The sub-skills in this course include visualization, listening comprehension, shadowing, paraphrasing, dual task training, and structuring. Prerequisite(s): ASL 203  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASL 210 Introduction to the Field of Interpreting

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to the profession of signed language interpreting. It covers the history of interpreting as a field of professional practice, introduces students to the Code of Professional Conduct and terminology related to the field. Theoretical models of interpreting, employment options in regard to various settings, function of assessing as part of the interpreting process, impact of legislation on the field, and occupational stress are explored. Additional topics include the phenomena of cross-cultural dynamics, oppression of minority groups and the role of an interpreter as a practice professional. Prerequisite(s): ASL 200 , ASL 202 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASL 211 Fingerspelling and Numbers Skill Development

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to develop intermediate receptive and expressive fingerspelling and number skills. This course provides an avenue to improved fingerspelled word and number recognition by providing theoretical information; practice in specific skills that underlie the fingerspelled whole word and phrase recognition process; identification of fingerspelled words and numbers in context; management strategies to request repetition of fingerspelled words and numbers; and production of short narratives that include fingerspelling, lexicalized fingerspelling, and numbers. Expressive skills focus on the development of speed, clarity, and fluency. Prerequisite(s): ASL 202  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASL 212 Deafhood: Moving Beyond Deaf Culture

    Credits: (3)
    This intermediate-high level course provides students with a new, in-depth cultural perspective on Deaf people who use American Sign Language (ASL). The course is based on the cultural model as opposed to the pathological model. After an analysis of the history of the American Deaf community, students will explore the progress of the Deaf community in terms of language, culture, education, arts, social norms, values, psychology, and technology. Students will also explore profiles of various contemporary Deaf individuals, the community, and their contributions to the Deaf community including Deafhood and Deaf Gain. Finally, students will apply course concepts to their own involvement with the community. Class is conducted entirely in American Sign Language. Prerequisite(s): ASL 200  or ASL 202 , or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASL 215 American Sign Language Literature and Film

    Credits: (3)
    Students will explore selected works of American Sign Language literature and film, and analyze and critique them in terms of the historical, social, cultural, and artistic journey of the American Deaf community and the individuals within the community. Various ASL literature genres will be studied, including but not limited to poems, jokes, and stories. Students will apply knowledge of ASL, storytelling techniques, and literary techniques to decode works of ASL literature and film. Additionally, students will create poems and stories in ASL using appropriate techniques and language skills. Prerequisite(s): ASL 202  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ASL 247 Linguistics of American Sign Language

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the basic grammatical and linguistic structures of American Sign Language. Students will examine the basic linguistic features of ASL phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics and the use of language. Language variation, discourse, bilingualism and language contact will also be included. Prerequisite(s): ASL 202  or equivalent, or permission of instructor.

Automotive Technology

  
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    ATC 103 Automotive Fundamentals

    Credits: (4)
    This course provides a foundation for students entering the automotive service field. It prepares the student with shop and tool safety, basic automotive maintenance procedures and pre-delivery inspection procedures. The internal combustion engine and related components are introduced in the course. Three class hours and a three-hour lab. Co-requisite(s): ATC 103L.
  
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    ATC 115 Automotive Electrical Systems

    Credits: (4)
    This course is an introductory course applied to the automobile. DC and AC circuits including series, parallel and series parallel are investigated. Concepts of magnetism and inductance are studied and applied to starting and charging systems. Laboratory emphasis is on basic electronic test equipment for diagnosing basic vehicle accessories and systems. Three class hours and a three-hour lab. Prerequisite(s): MAT 088 or permission of instructor
  
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    ATC 116 Automotive Electronics

    Credits: (4)
    This is an introductory course in semiconductor devices, circuits, digital concepts and microprocessors applicable to the modern automotive system. Laboratory emphasis is on test instrumentation and the application of troubleshooting techniques. Three class hours and a three-hour lab. Prerequisite(s): ATC 115 
  
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    ATC 131 Engine Concepts

    Credits: (3)
    A detailed study of the internal combustion engine. Topics include design criteria, theoretical combustion concepts, energy transfer, cylinder head design, intake and exhaust systems and efficiency principles. Service operations and measurement techniques are investigated in laboratory exercises. Two class hours and a three-hour lab.
  
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    ATC 142 Fuel and Ignition Controls

    Credits: (4)
    This course extensively explores fuel delivery and emissions control. The emphasis is on microprocessor control applications applied to fuel management ignition and related emissions devices. Principles of feedback control signals are investigated in laboratory exercises. Three class hours and a three-hour lab. Prerequisite(s): ATC 103  or permission of instructor
  
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    ATC 190 Cooperative Education I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to provide work experience directly related to the students field of study. A learning contact, containing specific educational objectives as they relate to the specific work experience and the students field of study, is developed between the student, department coordinator and the employer. There is a 120 hour minimum of work in the student co-op experience. The student is required to keep a daily work journal which provides relevant feedback to the department coordinator thereby ensuring a constant monitoring of tasks performed during the work session. Prerequisite(s): ATC 103  and ATC 115 , or approval by the Automotive Technology department.
  
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    ATC 207 Chassis Fundamentals

    Credits: (5)
    This course examines the design, construction and operation of basic vehicular suspension systems, braking systems, alignment geometry, wheel and tire fundamentals and steering systems. The emphasis is on service and electronic diagnostic procedures and these topics are discussed in detail. Laboratory exercises consist of wheel balancing and alignment, proper brake system service practices, suspension component diagnosis and replacement, anti-lock troubleshooting techniques and related chassis services. Rotor and drum machining techniques are explored in detail. Four class hours and a three-hour lab.
  
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    ATC 222 Drivelines and Geartrains

    Credits: (5)
    A thorough examination of manual and automatic transmissions/transaxles. Clutch operations, drivelines and differentials are addressed. Detailed power flow analysis for manual and automatic geartrains is provided in lecture with practical applications derived from laboratory exercises. Vehicle manufacturer service and maintenance procedures are investigated in lab activities. Four class hours and a three-hour lab.
 

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