Jun 16, 2019  
College Catalog 2017-2018 
    
College Catalog 2017-2018 [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


 

History

  
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    HIS 226 History of the Civil Rights Movements: 1 940 to the Present

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines chronologically the efforts by African Americans to obtain full civil rights from the pivotal period of 1940-1955 to the present. The class focuses on first-hand recollections of the Movement by African and non-African Americans, documentary and popular film representations of the Movement, and federal and state government responses to the Movement. The class discussions will seek to dispel the myths about the Movement while exposing the stereotypes, distortions, and romanticism that surround the Movement. An integral part of that discussion will be evaluating the strategies utilized by those advocating and those opposing the movement for civil rights. The course concludes with an extensive discussion of black conservatism and efforts to “turn back the clock” on civil rights gains.
  
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    HIS 240 The Plains Indians

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a study of the Plains Indians from their earliest beginnings to the present time. It will take a detailed look at the rise and development of Plains Indian societies, nomadic and village dwellers; the contact and conflict with Euro- Americans; the challenges faced by the Plains Indians to their traditional way of life during the early reservation years; and the struggle by the Plains Indians to retain tribal sovereignty, politics and culture. The course will make extensive use of visual artifacts, paintings, photographs and film to illustrate and analyze the historical and mythic images of the Plains Indians.
  
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    HIS 250 The History of Ancient Egypt

    Credits: (3)
    This course details the history of Ancient Egypt from the Neolithic through the Roman period. The course examines the development of history in the Nile River Valley, including the economic, political, social, and religious developments, which shaped the region and formed the basis for much of the later cultures of the Near East. Topics covered include European colonialism and the development of early historiography in the Near East, state formation, the age of pyramid building and the reasons for monumental architecture, the significance of early documentation and the cultural legacy of literature, the rise of imperial Egypt, the art and significance of mummification, the tomb of Tutankhamun, and the impact of the Hellenistic age. Students will analyze the significance of primary sources in forming a historical narrative of Egyptian history.
  
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    HIS 261 The Civil War

    Credits: (3)
    This course will examine the American Civil War (1861-1865) in its many aspects. Such topics as the origins of the crisis, the break-up of the Union, the major military campaigns, the actions and motives of Lincoln, Grant, Lee, Davis, and other key players will be explored, as well as the legacy of the war for future generations of Americans. Though military affairs will be emphasized, social, political and economic topics will be covered as well. There will be an extensive use of media.
  
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    HIS 276 American West: Film Study

    Credits: (3)
    We will study the settlement of the American West as it has been reflected in popular literature and films, focusing on the distinction between the actual frontier experience and the way that experience has been presented to us in our entertainment. Special emphasis will be placed on the Plains Indian, the mountain men, and the cowboys.
  
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    HIS 286 The American Worker: A Film Study

    Credits: (3)
    This course studies the American working class since the late Nineteenth Century and how Hollywood film has depicted the struggle of working people to enhance their lives within the capitalist system. The course will explore through lecture, film and readings such topics as the rise of the union movement; the great strikes; ideological controversy within the labor movement; and the role played by African-Americans, women, immigrants and radicals in working class history. Students will view in class major films dealing with the working class, such as The Molly Maguires, Matewan, The Grapes of Wrath, On the Waterfront, Salt of the Earth, and Norma Rae.
  
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    HIS 292 Collision of Cultures: America and Europe

    Credits: (3)
    This course will explore the collision of cultures that resulted from the voyages of Columbus and the European contact with the American continents. The life and career of Columbus and the Spanish conquest of the new world will be covered. The impact of this conquest on both European and American cultures and on subsequent world history will be examined.

Health Information Technology

  
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    HIT 101 Introduction to Health Information Technology

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces the student to health information management practices. Emphasis will be placed on electronic information systems in hospitals and physician’s offices. Manual information systems will also be discussed. The student will study the history of the health information management profession and professional ethics. Students will evaluate healthcare documentation against regulatory, accreditation and facility specific standards. Students will be required to complete assignments utilizing a simulated electronic medical record system during and outside of class time. 3 hours lecture 1 hour laboratory.
  
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    HIT 102 Legal Aspects of Health Information

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to provide the student with an overview of the legal and regulatory requirements for the maintenance, retention, and dissemination of health information and the role of patient documentation in legal proceedings. Major topics include: federal and state regulations; accreditation standards; the federal and state legal system; authorizations and consents, release of information, concepts of liability; civil procedures; compliance and the role of risk management. Students will be required to complete assignments utilizing a simulated electronic medical record system during and outside of class time.
  
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    HIT 103 Health Information Systems in Non-Hospital Settings

    Credits: (3)
    This course will introduce students to information systems in various facilities other than hospitals. Health information requirements and functions in both manual and electronic systems will be covered. The course will also address documentation and processes for reimbursement, regulations, and accrediting standards. Prerequisite(s): HIT 101  or permission of instructor; co-requisite: HIT 223 .
  
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    HIT 108 Health Information Applications

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to familiarize the student with software and computer applications used in health information. Other topics covered include the various applications used in health information management. Importance and methods for confidentiality and security systems will also be addressed. Students will be required to complete assignments utilizing a simulated electronic medical record system during and outside of class time. Prerequisite(s): HIT 101  and HIT 102 .
  
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    HIT 110 Coding and Classification Systems I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to familiarize the student with coding and classification systems used in health information management. Emphasis will be on outpatient coding, classification and reimbursement systems including CPT, HCPCS, APC’s and RBRVS. Students will become familiar with both manual and automated systems. Students may be required to complete activities within a simulated electronic medical record. Prerequisite(s): HIT 101  and BIO 171 .
  
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    HIT 120 Medical Terminology

    Credits: (3)
    This course will provide a detailed study of the meaning of medical terms that relate to medical science and human anatomy. Medical specialties including pathology, radiology, and pharmacology, as well as abbreviations used in the health care field, will be covered. In addition to definitions, pronunciation and spelling will be emphasized.
  
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    HIT 201 Health Statistics and Data Analysis

    Credits: (3)
    This course reviews descriptive and vital statistics, reporting documents, definitions and formulae for computing hospital and public health statistics. It will cover the management of health information as it relates to data collection, analysis and presentation. Topics will include the collection, analysis and display of data for quality assurance, utilization review, risk management and reimbursement. Students will be required to complete assignments utilizing a simulated electronic medical record system during and outside of class time. Prerequisite(s): HIT 101  and MAT 088 , or equivalent.
  
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    HIT 202 Management of Health Information Service

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces the student to the management functions of planning, organizing, directing and controlling. Human resource management and work flow will also be covered. In addition to health information management services, the functions of quality and utilization management and organizational compliance will be addressed. Students may be required to complete activities within a simulated electronic medical record. Prerequisite(s): HIT 101 , HIT 102 , HIT 110 , HIT 201 , HIT 208 , and HIT 212 .
  
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    HIT 205 Computer Applications in Health Information Management

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to familiarize the student with computer applications used in health information. Emphasis will be placed on the development, use, and maintenance of the electronic health records. Other topics covered include the various applications used in health information management. Importance and methods for confidentiality and security systems will also be addressed. Prerequisite(s): HIT 101 , HIT 102 , HIT 103 , HIT 110  and HIT 223 .
  
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    HIT 208 Electronic Health Records

    Credits: (3)
    The course will review guidelines and system development life cycle for developing and implementing EHR strategies for healthcare organizations. Framework and conceptual models will be used to describe an electronic health record and the various components will be covered. Emphasis will be placed on the development, use, and maintenance of the electronic health records. Students will be required to complete activities with in a simulated electronic medical record system in and outside of the classroom. Prerequisite(s): HIT 101 , HIT 102 , HIT 103 , HIT 108 , and HIT 110 .
  
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    HIT 212 ICD-10-CM/PCS

    Credits: (4)
    This course focuses on the ICD-10- CM and ICD-10-PCS classification systems. The course will introduce the student to the professional standards for coding and reporting of diagnostic inpatient and outpatient services and inpatient procedure services. Coding characteristics, conventions and guidelines will be applied in identifying and accurately assigning codes to diseases, conditions and procedures. Health records, manual and computerized coding methods, and coding references will be utilized in the coding process. Students may be required to complete activities within a simulated electronic medical record. Prerequisite(s): HIT 101 , HIT 110 , BIO 171 , and BIO 172 ; Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): BIO 221 . Class consists of three hours of lecture and two laboratory hours.
  
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    HIT 215 Healthcare Reimbursement

    Credits: (3)
    This course is the study of the principles of reimbursement and the practice of insurance processing in a variety of healthcare settings. Prospective payment systems, revenue cycle management, and pay-for-performance will be reviewed. Case-mix management, including the assignment and reporting of codes for diagnoses and procedures/services will be covered. Inpatient, skilled nursing, and outpatient cases will be reviewed to identify issues of fraud and abuse. Prerequisite(s): HIT 110  and HIT 212 .
  
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    HIT 223 Professional Practice Experience I

    Credits: (1)
    This course is designed to give students the opportunity to observe health information departments and systems in non-hospital settings. Students are assigned on a rotating basis to a variety of health related sites, including health regulatory agencies, ambulatory care, long-term care and other non-hospital facilities for a total of 40 hours. Prerequisite(s): HIT 101  Co-requisite(s): HIT 103 .
  
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    HIT 229 Professional Practice Experience

    Credits: (3)
    Students in the health information technology program are required to complete a professional practice experience within a healthcare setting. The main purpose of this experience is to integrate the didactic (lecture) component with the clinical (practice) components. Students will utilize the knowledge they have gained from the classroom lectures and laboratory experiences in the clinical setting. Each student will spend 15 days (120 hrs.) in a health care facility. Students may be required to complete activities within a simulated electronic medical record. The student is responsible for the arrangement and costs of transportation to and from the clinical site, parking and proper work attire. Prerequisite(s): HIT 101 , HIT 102 , HIT 108 , HIT 110 , HIT 201 , HIT 208 , HIT 212 , and permission of instructor; Co-requisite(s): HIT 202 .
  
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    HIT 230 Advanced Seminar in Health Information Technology

    Credits: (2)
    This course is designed to review and integrate previous HIT courses and clinical experiences. Exploration of career opportunities, preparation of resume, job search and interviewing for positions in health information technology will also be covered while participating in advance coding activities. Students will be required to complete assignments utilizing a simulated electronic medical record system during and outside of class time. Co-requisite(s): HIT 229 

Hotel Technology

  
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    HTL 230 Housekeeping and Properties Management

    Credits: (3)
    A detailed examination of the servicing of the guest in a lodging establishment. Critical attention is applied to the care and preventive maintenance of both public and private areas within the hotel edifice with emphasis on equipment, personnel and modern innovations.
  
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    HTL 232 Front Office Management

    Credits: (3)
    The day-to-day operations of the front office are examined from the progression of a room reservation to check-out. Room rate determination, billing systems, fiscal and accounting policies are emphasized. Traditional methods and systems are compared to computerized contemporary methods.
  
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    HTL 234 Meeting Management Planning

    Credits: (3)
    Meeting Management Planning provides the student an opportunity to explore the functions of planning, developing, budgeting, marketing, and evaluating meetings and special events.

Human Services

  
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    HUM 150 Human Services Theory, Skills, and Resources

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to career fields in Human Services and other helping professions. It also teaches the beginning interpersonal skills and techniques essential for effective human services workers. Theories covered include human development, and the effects of family, culture, social systems and diversity on the development of the individual. Students will learn how to apply this knowledge when working with people, and be introduced to the range of community resources for human services. Students will also explore career goals, clarify their personal and professional values, select a Human Services option and begin the process of identifying a field internship placement for HUM 164 : Field Instruction. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement must be at college level proficiency.
  
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    HUM 152 Human Services: Beginning Skills and Competencies

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to the skills and competencies necessary for professional and ethical conduct appropriate to career fields in Human Services. The course addresses the emotional and psychological stamina needed to work in the Human Services field; examines the importance of empathy when assisting individuals, children, families and people with disabilities in Human Services settings; and provides students with the tools to communicate effectively with clients and other Human Service professionals. Students will develop critical thinking and problem-solving skills using case study examples, and receive training in stress management and coping techniques to promote wellness. Teaching approaches include lecture, discussion, modeling, role play, and large and small group activities. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150  or permission of instructor.
  
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    HUM 162 Introduction to Social Work Practice

    Credits: (3)
    The student is introduced to generic social work methods; aspects of practice; the concepts of generalist; social systems interventions; and comprehensive social work service to individuals, small groups, and the community. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150  or permission of instructor.
  
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    HUM 164 Human Services Field Instruction and Seminar I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is the required supervised practice experience enabling the student to develop competency for the delivery of Social Work, Counseling, or Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling services at the Associate Degree level. The introductory learning experience allows the student to begin to develop a generalist knowledge base of Human Services, Social Work, Counseling, or Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling practice. Students will complete a 100-hour field placement at a site approved by the department. A medical examination, tuberculin test, background check and/or fingerprint review may be required. Prerequisite(s): 2.0 overall G.P.A., HUM 150 , and one of the following theory courses: HUM 162 , HUM 260 , or ASA 268 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    HUM 165 Introduction to Counseling

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to three broad areas of counseling: historical and professional foundations of the counseling profession, counseling theories, and counseling specialties (focusing on specific populations with whom counselors work or professional practices in which they are engaged). It is designed to provide an understanding of the counseling profession, an overview of the developments of counseling, fundamental counseling theories, and the variety of counseling specialty areas of practice. It is recommended that students take PSY 103  before taking this course.
  
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    HUM 203 Child Welfare and Social Work

    Credits: (3)
    This course presents the student with an overview of the child welfare system, particularly as it pertains to working with children and families within the discipline of social work and the community-at-large. Utilizing a strengths-based empowerment perspective in child welfare, the course will provide basic knowledge and understanding of the historical and ongoing development of the child welfare system, explore current services offered in child welfare agencies and examine practice decisions based on several social work methodologies. The impact of culture norms and the social marginalization of populations will be discussed as they relate to the definitions of abuse and the welfare of children and families. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150  or permission of instructor.
  
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    HUM 205 Psychosocial Impact of HIV/AIDS

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides a forum for students to learn about the history and social environment of HIV/AIDS, patterns of infection and psychosocial issues such as stigma, isolation, trauma, grief and poverty. Students will also explore the role of politics, public health, and community action, and the student’s responsibility to family, friends, and the community, both personally and as a professional in the helping professions.
  
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    HUM 230 Human Services With Diverse Populations

    Credits: (3)
    This course engages the students in an examination of diversity in domestic and global contexts. Primarily, we will explore the impact of ethnicity, race, gender, ability/disability, socio-economic class, and sexual orientation on our lives. Students will develop self-awareness regarding their own feelings, assumptions, and behaviors in relation to others different from themselves and how these impact their personal values and belief systems.
  
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    HUM 257 Crisis Intervention Counseling

    Credits: (3)
    This course is intended as an introduction to crisis intervention theories, models, and specific interventional therapeutic techniques. The course focuses on intervention, theories, and concepts in situational and developmental crises and is designed to assist students to acquire basic helping skills in crisis intervention counseling. Prerequisite(s): HUM 162 , HUM 165 , HUM 260 , or ASA 268 , or permission of instructor; PSY 103  is recommended.
  
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    HUM 260 Social Work Interviewing and Counseling

    Credits: (3)
    This course addresses the functions, roles, and techniques essential for effective social work/ human services work. It encompasses social work values, knowledge and skills in the interviewing and the counseling relationship. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150  or permission of instructor.
  
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    HUM 261 Social Work Policy

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the history of social welfare and institutionalized social services and the impact on social workers and other helping professionals. Topics include: child welfare, public health, racism, sexism and the evolution of social work as a profession. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150  or permission of instructor.
  
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    HUM 263 Human Services Field Instruction and Seminar II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an optional second-level field internship. The in-depth learning experience builds on the competencies of the first level and allows students to further develop their knowledge base of Human Services, Social Work, Counseling, or Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counseling practice. Students will complete a 100-hour field placement at a site approved by the department. A medical exam, tuberculin test, background check and/or fingerprint review may be required. Prerequisite(s): HUM 164  or permission of instructor.
  
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    HUM 265 Aging and the Family

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction and overview of the process of aging, including interactions among the biological, psychological, social, and economic aspects of aging in our society. Areas such as nutrition, health, housing, employment, and retirement will be explored with an emphasis on the interdependence of all these areas. The present status of the elderly and possible changes that might prevent or remedy the problems they face in today’s society will be discussed. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150  or permission of instructor.
  
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    HUM 267 Families in Crisis: Human Services Intervention

    Credits: (3)
    This course will introduce a study of families in crisis using intervention dynamics as the major treatment methodology. Focus is on specific developments and situational crises, which interfere with family functioning and coping abilities. The course will discuss social services, institutional services, and the role of the crisis counselor.
  
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    HUM 269 Social Work and People With Disabilities

    Credits: (3)
    This course will include a brief history of disabilities in our society, with definitions and discussion of various disability groupings, providers, services and interventions as well as many of the current issues that individuals with impairments and disabilities face today. It considers the impact of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1900 (ADA) and its effect on public awareness and attitudes. Prerequisite(s): HUM 150  or permission of instructor.
  
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    HUM 270 Assertiveness Training

    Credits: (1)
    This course helps students develop assertive skills for use in personal, professional, and social settings. Students will learn how to express their needs, address conflict, and assert their rights through clear, honest, and respectful interactions with others. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement must be at college level proficiency.

Interior Design

  
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    IND 101 Exploring Sustainability, Design, and The Built Environment

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an exploration of global built environments, with a focus on explaining significant design styles, movements, and trends within the context of the arts, politics, technology, business, the sciences, the social sciences, and an emphasis on sustainability. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course discusses the recent history of design in the built environment - what has impacted it and why. It is part of the three-course foundation for all Architecture and Interior Design students and is also a Liberal Arts elective. Prerequisite(s): ARH/IND major or placement in ENG 103 .
  
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    IND 110 Foundation Studio 1

    Credits: (4)
    This foundation studio in graphic communications will be used to explore design principles. Freehand and digital techniques will be introduced that help the student appreciate forms, texture and composition. Instruction will be given in pencil techniques, perspective principles, and the use of digital tools. This course will develop the required graphic skills to prepare architecture and interior design students for the next three semesters of course work. Co-requisite(s): ARH 101 /IND 101  and ARH 170 /IND 170 . This class meets 6 hours per week.
  
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    IND 111 Design Studio 2

    Credits: (4)
    Students in this course begin to explore elements of design and their relationships in three dimensional design problems. Design concepts and design process are discussed in detail. Architectural and interior design concepts of space, organizations, circulation, scale, structure, volume, massing, fenestration and materials are analyzed and discussed. This class meets 6 hours per week. Laptop computer required (must meet department standards for software and processing speed). Prerequisite(s): ARH 101 /IND 101 , ARH 110 /IND 110 , and ARH 170 /IND 170  Co-requisite(s): ARH 120 /IND 120  and ARH 140 /IND 120 , or permission of department.
  
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    IND 120 Drafting Studio 1: Wood Frame

    Credits: (3)
    This course will develop basic architectural drafting skills (digital and manual). The student will demonstrate an understanding of these skills through the development of a set of architectural drawings for a wood frame house or similar structure. Prerequisite(s): ARH 101 /IND 101 , ARH 110 /IND 110 , and ARH 170 /IND 170 ; Co-requisite(s): ARH 140 /IND 140  or permission of department. This class meets 4 hours per week.
  
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    IND 140 Wood Frame Construction

    Credits: (3)
    This is a lecture course covering the materials and methods of contemporary residential construction, including sustainability and the latest building science. The characteristics, properties, performance and application of materials and systems used in wood frame construction will be discussed.
  
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    IND 170 Technology: Design and Production

    Credits: (3)
    This course will develop the technology skills required for architecture and interior design students. The students will learn how to create, modify, communicate, collaborate, transmit and present solutions to problems using specific software applications including AutoCAD, SketchUp, ANGEL CMS, and PowerPoint. Prerequisite(s): ARH 101 /IND 101  and ARH 110 /IND 110 .
  
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    IND 215 Design Studio: Commercial

    Credits: (4)
    Students are expected to apply their knowledge of basic design principles, concepts, and design process to analyze and solve commercial interior design problems. Students study and apply principles of programming, concept getting, space planning, and elements of design, including materials and finishes selections, to create functional, attractive, accessible and sustainable commercial interiors. This design studio course focuses on specific user groups and commercial project types such as institutional, corporate, and retail. Oral presentation and manual and digital graphic 2D and 3D techniques are utilized to communicate project solutions. Prerequisite(s): IND 111  Co-requisite(s): IND 246  and IND 256 .
  
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    IND 216 Design Studio: Residential

    Credits: (4)
    Students are expected to apply their knowledge of basic design principles, concepts, and design process to analyze and solve residential interior design problems. Students study and apply principles of programming, space planning, and elements of design to create functional, attractive, accessible, and sustainable residential interiors. Special emphasis is placed on kitchen and bath design, and on National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA) guidelines and standards. Oral presentation and manual and digital graphic 2D and 3D techniques are utilized to communicate project solutions. Prerequisite(s): IND 111  and IND 256 ; Co-requisite(s): IND 247 . Non-interior design students, with the appropriate background, may take this course with permission of department.
  
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    IND 230 History of Architecture and Interiors 1

    Credits: (3)
    This is a survey course that traces developments in design, construction, materials and interiors from Prehistory to the dawn of the Renaissance. The comparative method is used to study the impact of economic, religious, political, sociological and technological developments on resultant building types, architectural forms, interior designs, furnishings and decorative arts.
  
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    IND 231 History of Architecture and Interiors 2

    Credits: (3)
    This is a survey course that traces developments in design, construction, materials and interiors from the dawn of the Renaissance to the present day. The comparative method is used to study the impact of economic, religious, political, sociological and technological developments on resultant building types, architectural forms, interior designs, furnishings and decorative arts.
  
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    IND 240 Residential Interiors

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to design and decoration of residential interiors. Topics include design principles and elements, approaches, sustainable environments and materials, furniture and decorating styles, fabrics, window treatments, accessories, and business practice. Prerequisite(s): ARH 101 /IND 101 ARH 110 /IND 110  and ARH 170 /IND 170 , or permission of department.
  
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    IND 246 Interior Finish Systems and Furnishings

    Credits: (3)
    This course concentrates on a comparative analysis of commonly used floor, wall, and ceiling finish systems for residential and commercial building interiors. Furnishings, furniture, and office landscape systems will also be discussed as time permits. Co-requisite(s): IND 215 
  
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    IND 247 Kitchen and Bath Fundamentals

    Credits: (3)
    Introduction to the fundamentals of residential kitchen and bath design and construction. The course focuses on three main areas: product knowledge, mechanical/electrical systems, and project/business management. National Kitchen and Bath Association (NKBA) guidelines and standards form the basis of instruction. Prerequisite(s): IND 140  Co-requisite(s): IND 216  Non-interior design students, with the appropriate background, may take this course with permission of the department.
  
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    IND 256 Graphic Communications

    Credits: (3)
    An advanced course in perspective rendering. Students are expected to apply perspective drawing skills acquired in ARH 110 /IND 110  to generate color renderings of building interiors and exteriors. Students taking Architectural Design Studio II are encouraged to take this course concurrently and to use their design solutions as a base for required rendering projects in ARH 256 /IND 256. Prerequisite(s): ARH 110 /IND 110  or permission of department.
  
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    IND 266 Individual Study Project

    Credits: (1)
    Any project suitable for individual or small group self-study, and approved by the department, may be pursued. Student(s) must be highly motivated and self-directive. The instructor will meet weekly with the student(s) and serve as a resource person. A learning contract containing specific educational outcomes that relate to both the project and the field of study is developed between the student(s) and a faculty member. The content of an Individual Study Project must not significantly duplicate material offered in a regularly scheduled course in the department. Open to students who have earned more than 32 credits and have a minimum 3.0 G.P.A. Prerequisite(s): Variable.
  
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    IND 290 Internship in Interior Design

    Credits: (1)
    This course is designed for students in their second year of interior design coursework, giving them an opportunity to obtain real-world experience in the interior design and construction industry. Internships and co-op job opportunities are available throughout the community; however, there is no guarantee of internship placement. The ultimate responsibility for obtaining a placement rests with the student. Assistance is provided by department faculty and Career Services. Internships may be paid or unpaid. A learning contract containing specific educational objectives that relate to both the work experience and academic studies is developed between the student and a faculty internship coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 60 hours of work per credit, maintenance of a work journal, and a final paper. Open to IND majors only. Prerequisite(s): Approval of department, minimum G.P.A. of 2.5, and sophomore standing.
  
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    IND 291 Internship in Interior Design

    Credits: (1)
    This course is designed for students in their second year of interior design coursework, giving them an opportunity to obtain real-world experience in the interior design and construction industry. Internships and co-op job opportunities are available throughout the community; however, there is no guarantee of internship placement. The ultimate responsibility for obtaining a placement rests with the student. Assistance is provided by department faculty and Onondaga’s internship office. Internships may be paid or unpaid. A learning contract containing specific educational objectives that relate to both the work experience and academic studies is developed between the student and a faculty internship coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 60 hours of work, maintenance of a work journal, and a final paper. Open to IND majors only. Prerequisite(s): Approval of department, minimum G.P.A. of 2.5, sophomore standing.
  
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    IND 292 Internship in Interior Design

    Credits: (1)
    This course is designed for students in their second year of interior design coursework, giving them an opportunity to obtain real-world experience in the interior design and construction industry. Internships and co-op job opportunities are available throughout the community; however, there is no guarantee of internship placement. The ultimate responsibility for obtaining a placement rests with the student. Assistance is provided by department faculty and Career Services. Internships may be paid or unpaid. A learning contract containing specific educational objectives that relate to both the work experience and academic studies is developed between the student and a faculty internship coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 60 hours of work per credit, maintenance of a work journal, and a final paper. Open to IND majors only. Prerequisite(s): Approval of department, minimum G.P.A. of 2.5, and sophomore standing.
  
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    IND 293 Internship in Interior Design

    Credits: (2)
    This course is designed for students in their second year of interior design coursework, giving them an opportunity to obtain real-world experience in the interior design and construction industry. Internships and co-op job opportunities are available throughout the community; however, there is no guarantee of internship placement. The ultimate responsibility for obtaining a placement rests with the student. Assistance is provided by department faculty and Career Services. Internships may be paid or unpaid. A learning contract containing specific educational objectives that relate to both the work experience and academic studies is developed between the student and a faculty internship coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 120 hours of work, maintenance of a work journal, and a final paper. Open to IND majors only. Prerequisite(s): Approval of department, minimum G.P.A. of 2.5, and sophomore standing.
  
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    IND 294 Internship in Interior Design

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed for students in their second year of interior design coursework, giving them an opportunity to obtain real-world experience in the interior design and construction industry. Internships and co-op job opportunities are available throughout the community; however, there is no guarantee of internship placement. The ultimate responsibility for obtaining a placement rests with the student. Assistance is provided by department faculty and Career Services. Internships may be paid or unpaid. A learning contract containing specific educational objectives that relate to both the work experience and academic studies is developed between the student and a faculty internship coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 180 hours of work, maintenance of a work journal, and a final paper. Open to IND majors only. Prerequisite(s): Approval of department, minimum G.P.A. of 2.5, and sophomore standing.

Italian

  
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    ITA 101 Elementary Italian I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed for students with little or no previous knowledge of Italian. Students acquire basic grammar and lexical skills that will enable them to communicate in routine social or professional situations within an authentic cultural context. Topics may include, but are not limited to the following: meeting and greeting, the city, describing people, university life, food, and family. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC. Upon successful completion of ITA 101, students may enroll in ITA 102 .
  
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    ITA 102 Elementary Italian II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a sequel to Elementary Italian I. It builds upon the basic grammatical, linguistic, communicative and cultural concepts learned in ITA 101 . Students learn to communicate in the context of an increasing number of daily life topics. Topics may include, but are not limited to the following: travel, getting around as a tourist, media, clothing and fashion, housing, and going on vacation. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness and Diversity (GLAD) requirement at OCC. Upon successful completion of ITA 102, students may enroll in ITA 201 . Prerequisite(s): ITA 101  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ITA 201 Intermediate Italian I

    Credits: (3)
    This dynamic course draws upon previously acquired knowledge, while introducing students to more complex grammatical and lexical structures to further develop communicative proficiency and cultural knowledge. The course is conducted mostly in Italian. Upon successful completion of ITA 201, students may enroll in ITA 202. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at Onondaga. Prerequisite(s): ITA 102 , four years of high school Italian, or permission of instructor.
  
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    ITA 202 Intermediate Italian II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a sequel to Intermediate Italian I. It expands upon complex grammatical and lexical structures. It is conducted entirely in Italian and provides a solid foundation for advanced study. Upon completion of ITA 202, students may enroll in any intermediate-high level course. Students who successfully complete the ITA 202 level have fulfilled their language requirement for the AA in Humanities and Teacher Prep Programs. The three additional credits may be taken in a Humanities elective instead of in a language course. This course also fulfills the Global Awareness requirement at OCC. Prerequisite(s): ITA 201 , 5 years of high school Italian, or permission of instructor.

Literatures, Cultures, and Civilizations

  
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    LCC 220 French Literature and Civilization in English I

    Credits: (3)
    A survey of French literature and civilization from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance, examining representative works within the context of artistic, historical and intellectual developments. Lectures and readings in English. This course fulfills the SUNY Gen Ed western civilization requirement as well as the Global Awareness requirement for the A.A. in Humanities and Social Sciences. However, it does NOT fulfill the foreign language requirement for any degree program.
  
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    LCC 245 Latin American Civilization and Cultures

    Credits: (3)
    This survey course taught in English will increase students’ understanding of the diverse and complex cultures of Latin America through an analysis of the historic, political, and economic forces that have shaped its societies, and by comparing and contrasting their historic and contemporary cultural manifestations to those in other parts of the world.

Law Enforcement

  
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    LEC 103 Principles of Law for Law Enforcement Officers

    Credits: (7)
    An introduction to the law as required of candidates. Topics include jurisdiction and responsibilities of law enforcement, criminal and civil adjudicatory process and court structure, constitutional law, penal law, criminal procedure law, juvenile law, civil liability, ancillary NYS statues, and vehicle and traffic law.
  
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    LEC 105 Law Enforcement Procedures

    Credits: (8)
    Law Enforcement Procedures teaches candidates the various topics, knowledge, actions, and procedures required of a police officer. Topics include observation and patrol procedures, the nature and control of civil disorder, domestic violence, crimes in progress, traffic enforcement procedures, arrest processing, and dealing with intoxication.
  
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    LEC 105L Law Enforcement Procedures - Proficiency

    Credits: (5)
    Students are instructed in the basic physical/psychomotor skills required of a police officer candidate. Students become certified as competent in the areas of arrest techniques, defensive tactics, the use of aerosol and impact devices, riot control formations, emergency vehicle operation, and unusual occurrences/critical incident management.
  
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    LEC 109 Public Safety Investigation Techniques

    Credits: (4)
    Public Safety Investigation Techniques teaches candidates the various topics, knowledge, actions, and procedures required to investigate a crime. Topics include information development, interviewing techniques, physical evidence, injury and death cases, sex crimes, criminal investigation techniques specific to larceny (specifically auto theft, burglary, robbery, and arson), narcotics and dangerous drugs, case preparation, organized crime, and missing of abducted children.
  
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    LEC 111 Community Relations for Public Safety Officers

    Credits: (2)
    This course covers community relations issues and skills for the candidate. Topics include community relations, community resources, services to victims and witnesses, crime prevention, crimes against the elderly, ethical awareness issues, cultural diversity, bias related incidents, sexual harassment issues and contemporary issues with which the police are confronted.
  
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    LEC 114 Phase 2 - Basic Course for Police Officers

    Credits: (2)
    Course topics include the proper circumstances and uses of firearms; counter terrorism issues, actions and reactions techniques; command and control issues for first responders; and tactics associated with detecting fraudulent identification documents.
  
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    LEC 114L Phase 2 Laboratory - Basic Course for Police Officers

    Credits: (5)
    Students are instructed in and are certified as competent in the areas of firearms training, counter-terrorism, DWI detection, standard field sobriety testing, and supervised field training review and orientation.
  
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    LEC 120 EMS Certified First Responder

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to EMS systems. Topics include: patient assessment, airway management, shock/hemorrhage control, trauma orientation, medical emergencies/OB emergencies and cardiology overview/defibrillation/CPR skills. Credit for this course may not be applied to any degree or certificate requirements.
  
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    LEC 126 Police Supervision

    Credits: (3)
    This course covers those areas pertinent to law enforcement supervision such as administrative procedures, leadership, effective communication, community relations, National Incident Management System and national response plan. The General Municipal Law requires that all first-line supervisory personnel complete this course. This course is open to sworn personnel only.
  
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    LEC 128 Instructor Development for Law Enforcement Officers

    Credits: (2)
    This course will give police personnel the ability to research, prepare, and communicate knowledge in the field of law enforcement. Lessons focus on setting instructional objectives, factors that influence adult learning, communication skills, the instructional process, and methods of evaluating course effectiveness.

Library

  
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    LIB 100 The Art of Inquiry

    Credits: (1)
    A seminar in practical general education with emphasis on such questions/issues as: What is the art of inquiry and how does it relate to the idea of the library? What questions are most worth asking? What does it mean to tend to things artfully? What is the “gift of reading”? This course will be of special value for students who are interested in finding their teachers.
  
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    LIB 210 Real-World Research

    Credits: (1)
    Finding information today is easier than it’s ever been before. But can you be sure what you’ve found is accurate? That question forms the basis of LIB 210. Topics include: types of information resources (e.g. Internet, print, etc.); search techniques; primary resources; critical evaluation; copyright and intellectual property issues; and the use and value of libraries and information centers in the twenty-first century. Students will learn how to locate and access high-quality, authoritative information. In addition, students will attain a basic familiarity with primary research methods and interpretation.

Mathematics

  
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    MAT 079 Pre-Algebra

    Credits: (3EQ)
    This course will provide students with concepts and techniques associated with pre-algebra mathematics. Topics include arithmetic of fractions, decimals, proportions, and percent and an introduction to signed number operations. This course will emphasize both skill development and an application of these skills to real world situations.
  
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    MAT 083 Essential Mathematics

    Credits: (6EQ)
    This course focuses on math for everyday life. Topics include fluency with numbers, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, algebraic reasoning, modeling, and communicating quantitative information. Development of arithmetic skills (fractions, decimals, proportions, and percents) is incorporated throughout the course. Mathematical concepts are investigated through group problems and class discussions based on real-life contexts of citizenship, personal finances, and medical literacy. This course prepares students to take a college-level non-STEM course in mathematics, such as MAT 104 , MAT 112 , MAT 113 , or MAT 118 . Students needing MAT 114  will also need to take MAT 088 . Prerequisite(s): Completion of RDG 087  or placement into a higher RDG level.
  
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    MAT 084 Mathematical Literacy

    Credits: (4EQ)
    This course focuses on mathematics for everyday life. It integrates fluency with numbers, proportional reasoning, data interpretation, algebraic reasoning, modeling, and communicating quantitative information. Mathematical concepts are investigated through group problems and class discussions based on real-life contexts of citizenship, personal finances, and medical literacy. This course prepares students to take a college-level non-STEM course in mathematics, such as MAT 104 , MAT 112 , MAT 113 , or MAT 118 . Students placing at this level and needing MAT 114  should take MAT 087  or MAT 088  instead of this course. Prerequisite(s): Arithmetic skills.
  
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    MAT 085 Math Skills and Applications

    Credits: (1EQ)
    Provides learning reinforcement for students enrolled in the areas of arithmetic, elementary algebra, or intermediate algebra. Both mathematical skills and applications will be emphasized. Students may enroll in this course only with a math diagnostician’s recommendation. This course will be offered in a workshop format as needed or as requested by other disciplines requiring math skills (i.e. Nursing, health related professions, Economics).
  
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    MAT 087 Beginning Algebra

    Credits: (3EQ)
    Topics include real number systems, algebraic operations, linear equations, coordinate systems, powers and roots, polynomials and factoring. Prerequisite(s): MAT 079  or equivalent based on placement testing.
  
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    MAT 088 Beginning Algebra and Applications

    Credits: (4EQ)
    Topics include real number systems, algebraic operations, linear equations, coordinate systems, powers and roots, polynomials and factoring. The skills and applications component provides students with an opportunity to practice newly acquired skills and to use these skills to solve practical problems. Math study skills will be infused throughout the course. Prerequisite(s): MAT 079  or equivalent based upon placement testing.
  
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    MAT 089 Beginning Algebra for Advanced Manufacturing/Mechanical Technology Program

    Credits: (2EQ)
    This non-credit course runs concurrently with MAT 109  and is required for students in need of beginning algebra skills as determined by placement testing. Topics will include real number systems, algebraic operations, linear equations, coordinate systems, powers and roots, polynomials and factoring, basic geometric and trigonometric concepts. A focus on mathematical applications pertaining to the Advanced Manufacturing/Mechanical Technology curriculum will be prevalent throughout the course. Equivalent credit will not be awarded for this course and MAT 087  or MAT 088 . For Advanced Manufacturing - Machining Certificate and Mechanical Technology A.A.S. Program students only. Prerequisite(s): MAT 079  or equivalent. Co-requisite(s): MAT 109 Intermediate Algebra for Advanced Manufacturing/Mechanical Technology Programs 
  
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    MAT 104 Quantitative Reasoning

    Credits: (3)
    This course focuses on mathematical and statistical reasoning important for decision-making in everyday life. It integrates quantitative literacy with percentages, probability, mathematical modeling, and statistical thinking. Concepts are investigated with hands-on activities using important medical, environmental, and financial decision examples. Communicating mathematics and using appropriate technologies will also be developed in this course. Prerequisite(s): MAT 084  or MAT 087 , or equivalent.
  
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    MAT 109 Intermediate Algebra for Advanced Manufacturing/Mechanical Technology Programs

    Credits: (4)
    This is a class designed to fulfill the mathematics requirement for the Advanced Manufacturing - Machining Certificate program and satisfy the prerequisite for the mathematics requirement for the Mechanical Technology A.A.S. degree program. Topics include solving linear equations and inequalities, graphs, functions, systems of equations, polynomials and polynomial functions, factoring, rational expressions and equations, radical expressions and equations, geometric concepts, quadratic equations, and right triangle trigonometry. A focus on mathematical applications pertaining to the Advanced Manufacturing curriculum will be prevalent throughout the course. This course may not be applicable as math credit for other departments without departmental permission. This course will not count toward any elective credit for Math-Science. Credit will not be awarded for this course and MAT 114 . For Advanced Manufacturing - Machining Certificate and Mechanical Technology A.A.S. Program students only. Prerequisite(s): MAT 087  or MAT 088  (or equivalent) or MAT 084 .
  
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    MAT 112 Nature of Mathematics

    Credits: (3)
    The purpose of this course is to improve problem-solving skills and extend students’ understanding of the nature of mathematics. The topics will include: problem-solving, number theory, Euclidean and Non-Euclidean geometry, the concept of infinity, and optional topics chosen from probability, topology, chaos and fractals. This course is primarily for liberal arts students entering fields of study which do not have a strong mathematical emphasis. Prerequisite(s): MAT 088 Beginning Algebra and Applications , MAT 084 Mathematical Literacy  or equivalent.
  
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    MAT 113 Contemporary Mathematics

    Credits: (3)
    The purpose of this course is to show a direct connection between mathematics and concrete real-life problems. Topics will include voting theory, routing problems (graph theory), and either scheduling, fair division or apportionment. This is a course primarily for liberal arts students entering fields of study which do not have a strong mathematical emphasis. Participation in group work is required for classroom sections. Prerequisite(s): Beginning Algebra or equivalent.
  
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    MAT 114 Intermediate Algebra With Applications

    Credits: (4)
    Topics include solving linear equations and inequalities, graphs, functions, systems of equations, polynomials and polynomial functions, factoring, rational expressions and equations, radical expressions and equations, geometric concepts, quadratic equations, and applications. This course will not count toward any elective credit for Math/Science majors. Prerequisite(s): Beginning algebra (with a grade of SB or higher) or equivalent.
  
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    MAT 115 Modeling for Decision Making

    Credits: (3)
    Linear systems, matrices, linear programming, mathematics of finance, counting procedures, sets, probability, functions, exponents. Use of specific technology will be required. Does not satisfy any requirement for the MTS.AS degree. Prerequisite(s): MAT 114 , intermediate algebra, college algebra or equivalent based on placement testing.
  
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    MAT 116 Decision Making With Calculus

    Credits: (3)
    This is the second of a two-semester sequence designed for business transfer and CIS students. Topics include: limits, instantaneous rates of change, differentiation, exponential and logarithmic functions, antiderivatives, indefinite integrals, definite integrals, and applications to business, managerial and social sciences. Not open to Math/Science majors. Prerequisite(s): MAT 115 .
  
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    MAT 118 Exploring Statistics

    Credits: (3)
    This is an introductory statistics course for non-STEM majors. Topics include: random sampling, graphical displays of data, measures of central tendency and dispersion, normal distribution, standard scores, confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, Student t distribution, two-way tables, probability, correlation and regression. Prerequisite: Placement into college level mathematics. Not open to Math/Science or Engineering Science majors or to anyone having earned credit in MAT 151  or BUS 219 . A calculator with two-variable statistics capabilities may be required.
  
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    MAT 119 Mathematics for Technical Disciplines I

    Credits: (4)
    This is the first course in a two-semester sequence of dimensional analysis, intermediate algebra, geometry, trigonometry, graphs and control charts, with an understanding of basic statistics. Topics included are: scientific and engineering notation, significant figures, unit conversion, fundamental concepts of algebra, functions and graphs, solving linear and quadratic equations, systems of equations, right triangle trigonometry, basic statistics, graphs and control charts. The scientific calculator will be used throughout the course. This course is intended for technical majors. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT 114 ) or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
  
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    MAT 120 Mathematics for Technical Disciplines II

    Credits: (3)
    This is the second course in a two-semester sequence of dimensional analysis, intermediate algebra, geometry, trigonometry, graphs and control charts, with an understanding of basic statistics. Topics included are: trigonometry (including identities), logarithms, exponential and logarithmic equations, variation, graphing with log and semi-log scales, and a brief introduction to differentiation and integration of polynomials. The scientific calculator will be used throughout the course. This course is intended for technical majors. Prerequisite(s): A grade of C or better in Mathematics For Technical Disciplines I (MAT 119 ) or equivalent, or permission of instructor.
  
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    MAT 121 Math for Elementary Teachers

    Credits: (4)
    This course is the first of a two-semester sequence designed for the prospective B-2, 1-6, 5-8, and B-6 teacher. Students who plan to transfer to a four-year institution in Early, Childhood or Middle Childhood Education should take this course and MAT 122 . Students will develop an understanding of the mathematical curriculum recommended by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics (NCTM) Standards. Topics include: sets, numeration systems, whole numbers, integers, rational numbers, real numbers, and number theory. A hands-on problem-solving technology-based approach will be emphasized throughout this course. This course fulfills the math requirements for General Studies, Humanities, and Human Services only. Prerequisite(s): MAT 087  and successful completion of the MAT 121 Competency Test.
  
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    MAT 122 Mathematics for the Elementary School Teacher: Problem Solving II

    Credits: (4)
    This course is the second of a two-semester sequence designed for the prospective B-2, 1-6, 5-8, and B-6 teacher. Students who plan to transfer to a four-year institution in Early Childhood or Middle Childhood Education should take MAT 121  and this course. Students will develop a comprehensive understanding of the mathematical curriculum recommended by the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics’ (NCTM) Standards. Topics include: geometry, probability, statistics, and the metric system. A hands-on problem-solving technology-based approach will be emphasized throughout the course. This course fulfills the math requirement for General Studies, Humanities, and Human Services only. Prerequisite(s): MAT 121 .
  
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    MAT 142 Trigonometric Functions

    Credits: (1)
    This course provides a functions (circular) approach to the study of trigonometry. Topics include unit circle, radian measure, identities and proofs, multiple and half angle formulas, inverse trigonometric functions, and solving trigonometric equations. Graphing calculator use is required. Prerequisite(s): Intermediate Algebra, College Algebra, or permission of department.
  
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    MAT 143 Pre-Calculus With Trigonometry

    Credits: (4)
    This course is designed to provide the necessary foundation for a standard calculus course. Topics include absolute value and quadratic inequalities, functions and their equations, exponential and logarithmic functions and their applications, right triangle trigonometry, law of sines and law of cosines, trigonometric functions (circular) and their inverses, trigonometric identities and equations, addition and multiple angle formulas, and binomial theorem. Graphing calculator use is required. Prerequisite(s): Grade of C or better in Intermediate Algebra (MAT 114 ), College Algebra, or permission of instructor.
 

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