Apr 26, 2018  
College Catalog 2018-2019 
    
College Catalog 2018-2019

Course Descriptions


 

Computer Engineering Technology

  
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    CMT 171 Digital Electronics

    Credits: (4)
    An introduction to digital (computer) integrated circuits, emphasizing the concepts that are basic to any digital system: number systems, small-scale and mid-scale gates, programmable logic devices, sequential logic, combinational networks, Boolean algebra, truth tables, Karnaugh maps, state machine design, timing diagrams, and digital arithmetic. Three class hours and a three-hour lab.
  
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    CMT 190 Introduction to Microprocessors

    Credits: (4)
    This course is an introduction to basic principles of microprocessor architecture and assembly language instructions. The content of the course is divided into three sections: microprocessor architecture, mnemonics, and interfacing I/Os. The course is designed around the Z80 microprocessor and its mnemonics. Topics included in the course are: overview of computers and microcomputers, Z80 microprocessor architecture, bus architecture, memory (R/W Memory, ROM, and EPROM), memory maps, I/Os, interfacing devices and introduction to the Z80 instruction set. The third section, interfacing I/Os, introduces various I/O techniques such as parallel I/O, serial I/O, and interrupts. Two class lectures and one hour for assembly language instructions. Prerequisite(s): CSC 111 , CMT 171 , or equivalent.

Communication

  
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    COM 100 Introduction to Communication

    Credits: (3)
    This survey course introduces students to the general field of communication and rhetorical studies. The concepts, principles, and practices of Interpersonal Communication, Public Speaking, and Small Group Communication will be the focus.
  
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    COM 121 News Literacy

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a survey of the ongoing changes in mass media with a focus on news literacy. Students will be introduced to the skills required to make critical evaluations of news and information sources across the spectrum of traditional and new media, assessing the content for such factors as diversity, accuracy, and bias. Prerequisite: English and reading placement at college level. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 121  and MAT 121 .
  
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    COM 122 Introduction to Journalism

    Credits: (3)
    This course will be an overview of journalism and its historical, ethical, and professional base, including a survey of the background and importance of journalism in society, its role in democracy, key stories that shaped history, standard-bearers across news platforms, and the principles and responsibilities essential for fair and credible news reporting. Prerequisite(s): Prerequisite: English and reading placement at college level.
  
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    COM 123 Student Media Reporting

    Credits: (1)
    This course provides academic credit to students who contribute to student-run college media. Submissions can range from small pieces, such as calendar items and captions, to longer pieces, such as news stories, features, and reviews, for those with more interest and experience in news writing. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 123  and COM 123. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level.
  
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    COM 157 Electronic Media Writing

    Credits: (3)
    This course helps students to master the diverse writing styles and formats used in writing for broadcast on radio, television and cable. These include public service announcements (PSAs), station IDs, promotional announcements, script formats, commercials, news copy, and program materials. Emphasis is on developing broadcast copy style, distinguishing words directed toward the ear and the eye. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 157  and COM 157. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103 .
  
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    COM 204 Advocacy/Opposition

    Credits: (3)
    Advertising, advocacy and public policy debates all require an understanding of the rhetorical nature of argumentation and persuasion. This course helps students develop that understanding through speeches, debates, group presentation, and community interaction. Prerequisite(s): COM 210 , PHI 107 , POS 100 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    COM 210 Public Speaking

    Credits: (3)
    Public Speaking is a course designed to acquaint the student with the basic theories and skills of public discourse. Course content includes the importance of audience analysis and adaptation, how to choose an appropriate topic, organization, speech purpose and delivery, and critical analysis of discourse. Word study, effective language use, effective non-verbal skills and critical listening skills are also stressed.
  
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    COM 220 Interpersonal Communication

    Credits: (3)
    This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the communication skills needed to succeed both academically and socially. Course content includes communication theory, perception, verbal and non-verbal communication, effective listening, assertiveness, awareness of the self as communicator, interpersonal problem-solving, and relational communication. Emphasis is placed on class discussion as a tool for learning and practicing the skills presented in class.
  
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    COM 225 Teamwork and Small Group Communication

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an in-depth study of the nature and process of teamwork and small group communication. Students will study the theory of small group process, the nature of small groups and group dynamics. The course will analyze small group/teamwork issues such as decision-making, problem-solving, creativity, computer mediated group communication, diversity and conflict management. Students will make small group/team presentations, as well as engage in small group/teamwork evaluation. Prerequisite(s): COM 100 , COM 210 , or COM 220 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    COM 227 Writing for Emerging Technologies

    Credits: (3)
    Fast-paced and widespread developments in technology have changed the way people distribute, access, and understand information. With the Internet serving both as a medium for text and images, and a delivery system for other kinds of digital content, competitive employees in the marketplace must be able to provide clear and effective pieces of web-based communication and other kinds of documents. This course will discuss the issues surrounding the new technology. Topics covered in the course include First Amendment law and the Internet, “repurposing” stories across platforms, and clear writing techniques. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103 .
  
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    COM 233 Introduction to Public Relations

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a survey of the foundational elements of public relations. The class discussions will draw on communication theory to introduce students to the core principles of public relations. Topics covered will include the history and future of public relations, audience analysis and the development of communication strategies for a range of different publics, campaign planning, various types of public relations agencies and their communication styles, social media, social responsibility, and ethics.
  
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    COM 240 Persuasion in Everyday Life

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an investigation of the various communication theories of persuasion as applied to the devising of persuasive messages, the presentation of persuasive messages, and the critical analysis of persuasive messages in a variety of contexts. Class activities, discussions, readings, and assignments are designed to develop communication skills necessary for effectiveness as producers and consumers of persuasive communication.
  
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    COM 245 Communication @ Work

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of communication in the workplace. The focus of the course is on analyzing and improving interpersonal communication in a professional context. Topics covered include: meeting management, interview techniques, participation in team and group communication, preparation of professional presentations, managerial communication, diversity in the workplace, and listening skills. This course emphasizes the development of practical and critical skills.
  
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    COM 251 News Writing

    Credits: (3)
    An introductory course in the basics of news reporting and writing, focusing on gathering information, story and sentence structure, accuracy, Associated Press style, and meeting deadlines. Students will write a variety of publication-ready news stories, including college-related events and student public interest stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 251  and COM 251. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103 .
  
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    COM 252 Feature Writing and Literary Journalism

    Credits: (3)
    Students will analyze and evaluate feature stories and writing in the genre of literary journalism. Drawing on techniques from the New Journalism, current models of literary journalism, and sound reporting practices, students will write a variety of publication-ready features, including profiles, critiques, and human interest stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 252  and COM 252. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103 .
  
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    COM 253 Student Publication Editing

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides academic credit to students who serve in editorial roles for student-run college media. Tasks can include assignment and placement of stories, feedback to student reporters, and copyediting, proofreading, and editing of final stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENG 253  and COM 253. Prerequisite(s): ENG 123 /COM 123  or permission of instructor.
  
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    COM 272 Communication and Conflict Management

    Credits: (3)
    This course explores the nature of conflict interaction from a communication perspective. The course will examine attitudes, conditions, and perceptions that influence communication interaction and conflict. Students will be introduced to communication tools and techniques for effectively managing conflict in interpersonal relationships, groups, the workplace and organizations. Prerequisite(s): COM 100 , COM 210 , COM 220 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    COM 282 Intercultural Communication

    Credits: (3)
    This course seeks to improve Intercultural Communication Competence through learning about communication patterns between those with different cultural backgrounds. Topics covered include: verbal and nonverbal differences in cultural expression, intercultural relationships, barriers to effective intercultural communication, methods for overcoming these barriers, stereotyping, intercultural relationships and conflict resolution. Students will learn the distinctive cultural features of one non-Western civilization and will learn to integrate theory with practice and real-life examples.
  
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    COM 284 Communication and Gender

    Credits: (3)
    This course seeks to acquaint students with the unique ways men and women tend to communicate. The focus of this discussion-oriented class is on how gender influences verbal and nonverbal communication, identity formation, listening, speaking, and interpersonal relationships. Additional topics covered will include communication and gender in the workplace and the classroom, as well as the influence of the media on gendered communication.
  
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    COM 285 Communication Ethics: Truth and Deception

    Credits: (3)
    This course analyzes the principles and practices of ethical communication, truth and deception as speech acts, and theories and techniques of verbal and nonverbal deception detection as applied to a variety of interpersonal, public, and professional contexts. We all face ethical dilemmas related to communication situations in our educational, personal, and professional lives on a daily basis. This course seeks to explore the complexity of those situations and to help develop critical thinking and analytical skills through a communication perspective. Prerequisite: C or better in any Communication course.
  
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    COM 290 Communication Seminar

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the power of communication in a variety of applications and contexts. The course introduces students to a range of communication theories, and provides opportunities to apply those theories to communication phenomena. Possible contextual focuses for the course could include: the rhetoric of social movements, strategic communication through song, the rhetoric of religion, family communication, or other emerging topics within the field. Class activities, discussions, readings, and assignments are designed to develop a better understanding of communication theories and skills through critical analysis of communication phenomena. Prerequisite(s): Any 100-level Communication course AND any 200-level Communication course, OR permission of instructor.

Corrections Officers

  
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    COR 103 Principles of Law for Correction Officer

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to law as required of peace (correction) officer candidates. Topics include jurisdiction and responsibilities of a Peace Officer, legal issues, criminal and civil liability, court structure, penal law, correction law, criminal procedure law, crime scene preservation, and investigation by a Peace Officer. Prerequisite(s): Open only to sworn peace (correction) officers
  
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    COR 105 Correction Officer Procedures and Responsibilities

    Credits: (4)
    This course introduces candidates to the various topics, knowledge, actions and procedures required of a Correction Officer. Topics include observation and supervision procedures for running a direct supervision housing unit, reacting to and dealing with special needs inmates, incident management prevention, suicide risk assessment and prevention, and enforcing facility rules and regulations. Prerequisite(s): Open only to sworn peace (correction) officers Co-requisite(s): COR 103 , COR 109 , COR 111 , and COR 112 .
  
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    COR 109 Inmate Management and Response to Facility Emergencies

    Credits: (4)
    Students are instructed in essential services and programs for inmates which are based on the requirements set forth by the constitution, state law, and court decisions, and must be provided to all inmates. Topics include communication skills, and inmate and stress management. Students will also be instructed in proper procedures for dealing with emergency situations within a correctional facility setting. Prerequisite(s): Open only to sworn peace (correction) officers
  
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    COR 111 Professional Relations for Correction Peace Officers

    Credits: (2)
    This course covers professional relations issues and skills for the Correction Officer. Topics include correctional ethics, personal awareness, cultural diversity, and sexual harassment/sexual misconduct issues. Candidates will also learn skills and techniques for handling inquiries from the media and for disseminating information about cases to the media. Prerequisite(s): Open only to sworn peace (correction) officers Co-requisite(s): COR 103 , COR 105 , COR 109 , and COR 112 .
  
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    COR 112 Correction Officer Procedures- Subject Management Proficiency

    Credits: (4)
    Students are instructed in the basic physical/psychomotor skills required of a peace officer candidate. Students become certified as competent in the areas of basic officer survival skills, defensive tactics, the use of aerosol subject restraint, and the extendable baton. Prerequisite(s): Open only to sworn peace (correction) officers Co-requisite(s): COR 103 , COR 105 , COR 109 , and COR 111 .

Criminal Justice

  
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    CRJ 101 Justice System

    Credits: (3)
    This introductory course is designed to acquaint students with the collection and analysis of crime data, the activities of the components of the criminal justice system, and key criminological theories. Special attention is paid to the interrelationship among law enforcement, courts, and corrections as they work toward balancing public order and individual rights in an increasingly diverse society. Required of all Criminal Justice majors. Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): ENG 099  and ILS 093 , if placements are not at college level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    CRJ 107 Women and the Criminal Justice System

    Credits: (3)
    This course explores the intersection between women and the criminal justice system. The nature and extent of women as offenders, as victims, and as professionals in the criminal justice system will be explored, as well as theories related to offending and victimization. Also integral to the course is the relationship between victimization and offending and the intricacies of women’s intersectionality with the criminal justice system as offenders, law enforcement officers, correction workers, lawyers and judges.
  
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    CRJ 108 Police and the Community

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines police and community collaboration to maintain public safety with a focus on their ever evolving relationship. The history, current strategies and impact of this inter-dependence on crime rates and community safety will be explored. The influence of culture, race, and ethnicity is interwoven into the study of strategies required to build a strong police and community partnership.
  
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    CRJ 142 Criminal Investigation

    Credits: (3)
    CRJ 142 is a course that focuses on methodology in the field of crime, modus operandi, sources of information, crime scene search and recording, collection and preservation of physical evidence, interviews and interrogation, scientific aids, observation and description, case preparation, and testimony in court. There is a strong emphasis on investigative policies, procedures, and practices that are necessary and essential to secure the truth within today’s legal climate.
  
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    CRJ 201 Criminology

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the nature, function, and causes of crime. Tracing the evolution of crime theory from the 18th Century to the present, focus is placed on the application of theory within the context of contemporary crime control policy, victimization and offender treatment within the criminal justice system. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101  and ENG and ILS placements must be at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    CRJ 202 Ethics and Criminal Justice

    Credits: (3)
    This course will explore the ethical issues that confront modern practitioners in the various criminal justice settings. Emphasis will be placed on recognizing and analyzing moral dilemmas confronting criminal justice professionals, both on an organizational and individual level, as well as determining responses to those complex and controversial dilemmas through an understanding of ethical theories, the development of ethical reasoning skills, and the application of appropriate standards and codes of conduct. Approaches to solving ethical dilemmas are applied to the reality of careers in a variety of criminal justice fields such as law enforcement and punishment and corrections, to the role of the prosecutor, defense counsel and judiciary in the administration of justice. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 203 Juvenile Delinquency

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the justice system’s practice of treating juveniles and adults differently. It addresses the physical, emotional, and social issues faced by juveniles in an increasingly diverse society. Students will study the major theories proposed as explanations of deviant and delinquent behavior, and will explore the use of theory as a foundation for policy and research. Prerequisite(s): ENG and ILS placements must be at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    CRJ 206 Juvenile Justice System

    Credits: (3)
    This course will cover the history and philosophy of juvenile justice in America, the mission and how it diverges from adult philosophy and process, and the impact of present societal reforms on the juvenile system. A wide array of theoretical positions will be discussed, as will the influence of the family, media, peers, socioeconomic status, drugs, gang affiliation, and schools. Students will be introduced to landmark juvenile court cases and the current trends. The role of the police, the juvenile court, and juvenile institutions will be explored.
  
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    CRJ 207 Sexual Violence and the Criminal Justice System

    Credits: (3)
    This course will explore the criminal justice system response to crimes of sexual violence against both adults and juveniles, including the crimes of child sexual exploitation and the global sex trade industry. The various types of offenders and rehabilitative efforts will be discussed as will the role of law enforcement in all aspects of the investigation and the specific problems that arise in the process of adjudication.
  
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    CRJ 210 Terrorism and the Criminal Justice System

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces the student to the study of terrorism. It will focus on both domestic and foreign varieties of this unique form of organizational crime and its implications for the American criminal justice system. Prerequisite(s): ENG and ILS placements must be at college level or permission of instructor.
  
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    CRJ 212 Organized Crime and Society

    Credits: (3)
    A systematic exploration of theoretical and practical issues pertinent to organized criminal behavior. The organizational structures of traditional and nontraditional groups are studied as well as the historical background beginning in the nineteenth century. The impact of law enforcement is thoroughly reviewed with special emphasis on illegal drug trafficking. The relationships between drug use and crime are examined from the legal and societal viewpoint. Additionally, the relationship between the political environment and organized crime, including the infiltration of legitimate business, is studied.
  
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    CRJ 215 Criminal Law

    Credits: (3)
    A study of the scope, purpose, definition, and classification of crimes. Consideration is given to the more common offenses under the Penal Law. A concern for criminal intent, acts of omission and commission, arrest, and search and seizure, along with an introduction to the Criminal Procedure Law, is emphasized. The rules of evidence and their application to proper law enforcement will also be discussed. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101  and ENG and ILS placements must be at college level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    CRJ 219 Victims, Witnesses, and the Criminal Justice System

    Credits: (3)
    This course focuses on the impact of crime on its victims and witnesses. Specific types of victims, witnesses, and crime will be studied, including homicide, sexual assault, domestic violence, child maltreatment, and elder abuse. This course requires the student to analyze restitution issues, the treatment of victims and witnesses by the criminal justice system, victims’ rights legislation, and contemporary trends in the treatment of crime victims and witnesses. Prerequisite(s): Placement in ENG 103  and ILS 140 /ILS 153 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    CRJ 220 Corrections Process

    Credits: (3)
    This course focuses on the development, organization, and effectiveness of corrections. The legal rights of the probationer, the inmate, and the parolee are examined in detail, providing both the student and practitioner the basis for understanding future developments in corrections. Observations are made as to the effectiveness of modern rehabilitation techniques, obstacles to correctional progress, and strategic errors made in correctional reform. Students are taught to perceive and articulate ethical issues in corrections. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101  and ENG and ILS placements must be at college level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    CRJ 226 Law Enforcement Process

    Credits: (3)
    This course covers the history and development of law enforcement in modern society and the various systems of police control and philosophical aspects of police service with an overview of crime and police problems. The process of justice and constitutional limitations on law enforcement, along with the organization and jurisdiction of local, state, and federal agencies are covered. A survey of professional career opportunities is interwoven into the course, as well as the critical importance of an ethical decision making process in every aspect of police activity. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101 , and ENG and ILS placements at college level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    CRJ 232 Cybercrime

    Credits: (3)
    This course focuses on computer based crime and cybercrime issues facing the American criminal justice system. The course explores computer based crime investigations, the importance of preserving and correctly interpreting digital evidence, the application of cybercrime laws and regulations along with the identification of emerging issues facing the legal system (Courts). Students will also examine the future trends of cybercrime and government responses. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101 .
  
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    CRJ 241 Homicide Investigation

    Credits: (3)
    This course will introduce the student to various investigative methods utilized in general death investigation as well as specific investigations involving suicides, accidents, and homicides. The purpose of the course is to explore the various causes of homicide and the nature of death investigation in the United States. The techniques employed by the personnel and agencies tasked with resolving cases involving death will be examined. The intra-agency relationships as well as the scientific tools used in processing death investigation cases will be explored.
  
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    CRJ 243 Criminalistics I

    Credits: (3)
    A comprehensive overview of the collection, preservation, analysis, and interpretation of physical evidence of various types, including: forensic photography, latent fingerprints, footprints, tire tracks, firearms identification, tool marks, glass fractures, questioned documents, and ink identification. The function of the crime laboratory and the use of the criminalist as an expert witness will also be examined.
  
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    CRJ 244 Evidence Analysis

    Credits: (3)
    This course covers the advanced microscopic and chemical methods of crime detection: DNA, drugs, explosives, poisons, ultraviolet and infrared examinations, advanced optical and instrumental methods of analysis. Special problems and topics of interest in criminalistics are also covered. Prerequisite(s): CRJ 101  and ENG and ILS placements must be at college level, or permission of instructor.
  
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    CRJ 252 Internship

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides the student an opportunity to integrate classroom theory and knowledge with the practices of the criminal justice system agencies. The course is designed to promote professional development, and expose students to the realities of working in the system in several capacities. The internship will provide challenging and valuable work experience in an environment conducive to learning and prepare students for future careers in the field of criminal justice. Prerequisite(s): completion of CRJ 101  and permission of instructor.

Computer Science

  
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    CSC 109 Algorithm Development

    Credits: (1)
    This course teaches Computer Science students to develop solutions for simple and complex problems through top-down algorithm and pseudo-code design. Topics will include general program flow structures including linear processing, selection, and iteration. Students will learn the procedures to break problems into smaller pieces in order to develop, refine, and test their algorithms.
  
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    CSC 110 Program Design and Development

    Credits: (4)
    This is a language dependent introduction course on computer program design and development. Emphasis is on the identification and solution of business problems through systems of computer programs. Programs are described and designed through such tools as program flowcharts, structure charts, and pseudocode. Within this framework, programming languages are treated as tools which can be selected, as appropriate, to implement the designs.
  
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    CSC 111 Fundamentals of Computing I

    Credits: (4)
    This course provides the foundation for a program of study in computer science. It introduces the discipline of computing and the roles of professionals. A contemporary high-level language with appropriate constructs for structured design and structured types is presented. It integrates an introduction to algorithm design, an understanding of abstraction applied to date types and structures, and an appreciation of imperative and object-oriented programming. Programming assignments are an integral part of this course.
  
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    CSC 112 Fundamentals of Computing II

    Credits: (4)
    This course develops the discipline of computing and the roles of professionals by introducing software engineering early in the learning process. This course formally presents abstract date types (ADTs). The ADTs presented are stacks, queues, lists, trees, graphs and tables. Simple sorting and searching techniques, along with their efficiency are studied. The use of pointers and recursion is covered. Programming assignments are an integral part of this course. Prerequisite(s): CSC 111 .
  
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    CSC 162 Visual Basic I Programming

    Credits: (4)
    This is a language and platform (OS) dependent introduction course on computer program design and development. Lectures cover the style and techniques necessary to solve problems using the Visual Basic programming language. Basic concepts of object oriented programming will be covered. This course shows how to create programs using a graphical user interface (GUI). Students will demonstrate an understanding of how controls on the GUI interact with the program’s code. In addition, they will demonstrate an understanding of Event Handlers. Implementation of design will be done using pseudo code using a top-down design approach.
  
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    CSC 211 Computer System Organization

    Credits: (4)
    This course emphasizes the organization and operation of real computer systems at the architectural level. The mapping of statements and constructs in a high-level language onto sequences of machine instruction is studied, as well as the internal representation of simple data types and structures. Topics include the fetch/execute cycle, bus structures, memory hierarchy, addressing modes, and subroutines. Alternative architectures, such as vector and parallel models, are presented. Three
    lecture hours per week. Prerequisite(s): CSC 110  or CSC 111  Three lecture hours per week.
  
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    CSC 221 Software Engineering

    Credits: (4)
    This course is the capstone course for the AS degree in Computer Science. The course focuses on software engineering and requires a major software project. Topics include: object-orientation, software design tools and techniques (such as data flow diagrams, structure charts, CRC cards, algorithms, pseudocode), software reuse, software test strategies, and documentation standards. Prerequisite(s): CSC 112 .
  
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    CSC 222 Game Programming

    Credits: (4)
    This course is an introduction to game programming techniques and gaming development. Topics include 2D graphics and animation, sound technologies, interactivity, and multi-player games. Prerequisite(s): CSC 111  or permission of instructor.
  
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    CSC 224 Application Development for Mobile Devices

    Credits: (4)
    This course is an introduction to application development and techniques for mobile devices. Topics may include development of games, social applications, and other applications for mobile devices. Prerequisite(s): CSC 111  or permission of instructor. Four lecture hours.
  
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    CSC 250 Server Administration

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the administration of servers operating in a client server environment. Students will be introduced to the system software running client server networks, and will learn to install, configure, monitor, and manage a network server. Specific topics include server software installation, protocols, shells, system and user administration, scripts, and daemons. Students will be exposed to several different operating systems and several server applications, such as Web, ftp, database, and mail servers. Prerequisite(s): CIS 130  or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours.
  
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    CSC 255 Database Design and Development

    Credits: (3)
    The fundamentals of database design and implementation are introduced with an emphasis on data relationships. Utilization of a Database Management System (DBMS) and its components will be covered, along with Structured Query Language (SQL) and data security techniques. Prerequisite(s): CIS/CSC major with sophomore standing.
  
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    CSC 263 C++ Programming

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the C++ language, which provides software developers with an “extendable” language in which abstract data types suitable for a given application can be created and then used as naturally as built in data types. While based on the C programming language, C++ provides data and function encapsulation, function overloading, inheritance, strong typing, and other features needed for object-oriented programming (OOP). This makes C++ a true high level language suitable for professional software engineering. The language constructs and OOP methods are introduced with a series of examples of increasing sophistication, which are the basis of project assignments. Prerequisite(s): CSC 110 , CSC 111 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    CSC 264 Java Programming

    Credits: (4)
    This course introduces object-oriented Java using current technical advances in programming methodology, Web-based applications, and applications for handheld devices. Java methods, classes, objects, inheritance, graphics, animation, and networking are discussed. Prerequisite(s): CSC 111  or permission of instructor. Four lecture hours per week.
  
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    CSC 280 C#.Net Programming

    Credits: (3)
    This course focuses on the language and programming fundamentals of the C# language and object-oriented programming in the context of the .NET development environment. Topics covered will include: The .NET platform, including common language runtime and framework, Visual Studio Development Environment, Object-Oriented Programming, C# Language and Application Structure and basic GUI constructs. This course may not be used to fulfill a Liberal Arts elective. Prerequisite(s): CSC 110 , CSC 111 , or permission of instructor.

Economics

  
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    ECO 103 Modern Economic Issues

    Credits: (3)
    In this course, students will discuss current micro and macro economic issues in an intuitive, non-mathematical format. A wide range of topics are covered with an emphasis on the global economy. This course satisfies the Humanities and Social Sciences Global Awareness requirement and is open to all students.
  
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    ECO 104 Personal Finance and Consumer Economics

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to financial planning and consumer practices. Topics include: money management, investments, tax planning, estate planning, insurance, real estate, and the purchasing and financing of consumer goods and services.
  
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    ECO 160 Poverty, Inequality and Discrimination

    Credits: (3)
    This course covers various causes of poverty in the U.S. (relative poverty) and in developing nations (absolute poverty), as well as policies, programs, and proposals for improvement. Inequality, stratification, and discrimination are also addressed. This course satisfies the Humanities and Social Sciences Global Awareness requirement and is open to all students.
  
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    ECO 203 Principles of Macroeconomics

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to the forces that shape overall economic activity and determine productivity, standards of living, economic growth, employment, inflation, interest rates, and business cycles.
  
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    ECO 204 Principles of Microeconomics

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to microeconomic theory and applications, stressing consumer and producer behavior, price determination, trade, market structures, markets for factors of production, market failure, government failure, and international issues.
  
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    ECO 209 Money and Banking

    Credits: (3)
    A study of the nature and function of money and finance, this course outlines the institutional framework of the American financial system and describes and explains the special role played within the system by financial institutions and markets. Topics include the risk and term structure of interest rates, debt and equity markets, financial structure, financial crises, financial regulations, financial derivatives, and foreign exchange.
  
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    ECO 219 Fundamentals of Investments

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the relationship between risk and return, asset allocation, portfolio theory, and investment vehicles including stocks, bonds, mutual funds, options, and futures.

Education

  
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    EDU 154 Fostering Creativity Through the Arts

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to the development of creativity through expressive arts, music, movement, and dramatic play. Concepts related to creativity, curriculum development, and awareness of cultural diversity in the arts will be explored through developmentally appropriate practice. Prerequisite(s): EDU 180  or permission of instructor.
  
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    EDU 156 Guidance of Young Children

    Credits: (1)
    This course focuses on developmentally appropriate, evidence based approaches and positive guidance strategies for supporting the development of each child. An emphasis will be on supportive interactions and environments. The impact of family, culture, language and ability will also be explored.
  
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    EDU 157 Early Childhood Environments

    Credits: (1)
    This course explores the process of designing developmentally appropriate learning environments for young children. Emphasis will be on physical space, both indoor and outdoor, room arrangement, how the environment supports families, and how to design an environment that is engaging for young children.
  
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    EDU 158 Infant/Toddler Development and Care

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines all domains of infant and toddler development (newborn to age 3), including: language, cognitive, physical and social/emotional development. Atypical development and the importance of early intervention are also presented. In addition, observation and teaching strategies necessary for quality education and care of infants and toddlers will be studied. Topics include observation and assessment, developmentally appropriate curriculum, safe and healthy environments, and developing culturally responsive relationships with families. Students will be required to complete a 25-hour field placement. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at the college level.
  
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    EDU 172 Classroom Management

    Credits: (3)
    This course explores guidance theories, applications, goals, techniques, and factors that influence expectations and classroom management issues. The effects of culture and student diversity on the classroom environment will be explored. Classrooms serving children ages two to twelve years will be addressed.
  
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    EDU 180 Early Childhood Education: An Introduction

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to introduce prospective early childhood (birth-grade 2) and childhood (grades 1-6) education teachers to the historical, philosophical and cultural approaches to the study of early childhood education. Students will examine current issues and challenges and begin development of their professional education, skills, and beliefs. A field component will be required. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement at college level.
  
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    EDU 182 Child Growth and Development

    Credits: (3)
    This is a specialized course in child development which studies the emotional, social, cognitive and physical development from the prenatal period to preadolescence. Students will use observation and assessment techniques to build an understanding of growth and development. Multiple influences on child development and learning, including the sociocultural context of development, will be explored. Prerequisite(s): English and reading placement must be at college level.
  
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    EDU 183 Observation and Assessment of Young Children

    Credits: (3)
    This course prepares students to use systematic observations, documentation, and other assessment techniques to understand young children’s growth and development. Observation and assessment will focus on physical, cognitive, language, and social/emotional development. Students will compile various observations and assessments in a study of one child’s development over the course of the semester. An additional component of the course will focus on observation and assessment of early childhood education environments. Prerequisite(s): EDU 180  and EDU 182 , or EDU 180  and PSY 204 .
  
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    EDU 184 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar I

    Credits: (3)
    The first level fieldwork course offers students the opportunity to apply theories learned in previous early childhood education courses to practice. Under the supervision of an experienced early childhood teacher, students develop basic interaction, guidance, and supervision skills. The course also focuses on implementing and evaluating developmentally appropriate experiences for children. The one-hour weekly seminar is used to discuss fieldwork experiences and teaching concepts and skills. The required 100 hour field placement must be completed at the Children’s Learning Center on campus, an NAEYC accredited program, or other program approved by the instructor. A medical exam, fingerprinting, and Child Abuse Central Register clearance are required. Prerequisite(s): EDU 182  or permission of instructor Co-requisite(s): EDU 281 
  
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    EDU 185 Teacher and Parent Relationships

    Credits: (1)
    This course focuses on the dynamics of child-teacher-parent relationships. Students will explore family diversity, parenting styles, effective communication, parent education, and family involvement. Strategies dealing with issues that emerge when working with young children and their families will be studied.
  
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    EDU 200 Intentional Teaching, Observation, Assessment, and Curriculum Planning for Young Children

    Credits: (1)
    This is a specialized course in observation and assessment that focuses on intentionally connecting classroom observations with specific developmental child outcomes. Various strategies will be introduced to guide students to purposeful documentation and use of observation data to plan meaningful curriculum. Prerequisite: English and reading placement at college level.
  
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    EDU 230 Human Services With Diverse Populations

    Credits: (3)
    This course engages the students in an examination of diversity in domestic and global contexts. Primarily, we will explore the impact of ethnicity, race, gender, ability/disability, socio-economic class, and sexual orientation on our lives. Students will develop self-awareness regarding their own feelings, assumptions, and behaviors in relation to others different from themselves and how these impact their personal values and belief systems.
  
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    EDU 255 Mathematics, Science, and Technology for Young Children

    Credits: (3)
    This course investigates the standards, principles, and practices of teaching mathematics, science, and technology to young children. Emphasis is placed on designing integrated math and science activities, and the use of technology, that utilize developmentally appropriate content, processes, environment, and materials. Prerequisite(s): EDU 281  or permission of instructor.
  
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    EDU 275 Cultural Foundations of Education

    Credits: (3)
    This course focuses on philosophical, historical, and cultural approach to the study of education in the United States. Current educational concerns that affect teaching and schools will be studied. A social justice perspective will be emphasized. Students will complete a 30-hour field observation during this semester. Prerequisite(s): PSY 204  or PSY 207  orEDU 182 .
  
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    EDU 280 Language and Literacy Development in Young Children

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the development of language and literacy in young children from birth through the primary years. Students will explore theoretical foundations of early literacy development and the implementation of various models to effectively support young children as readers and writers. Other topics include: working with families to support early literacy development, selecting quality children’s literature, assessing early literacy development, integrating literacy throughout the curriculum and adaptations for individual children in diverse and inclusive settings. Prerequisite(s): EDU 182  or EDU 158  or PSY 204  or PSY 207 , or permission of instructor.
  
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    EDU 281 Curriculum Development

    Credits: (3)
    The theoretical basis for setting educational goals and planning developmentally appropriate experiences for children from birth to age eight (with emphasis on the preschool years) in group settings is studied, along with methods of planning, supervising, and evaluating experiences and activities. A field component is required in conjunction with EDU 184 . Prerequisite(s): EDU 180  and EDU 182 , or permission of instructor
  
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    EDU 282 Family, School and Community

    Credits: (3)
    This course examines the contexts in which children develop, including family, school, and community, and how teachers can work together with parents and community resources to foster the optimum development of children. Prerequisite(s): EDU 182  and PSY 103  or SOC 103  or permission of instructor.
  
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    EDU 283 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar II

    Credits: (3)
    This second level fieldwork course builds on the competencies developed in EDU 184 , the first level fieldwork experience course. Particular attention is given to assuming the role and responsibilities of classroom teacher in planning, supervising and evaluating curriculum experiences that are developmentally appropriate as well as integrated. The weekly seminar is used to discuss fieldwork experiences, teaching concepts and skills. A medical exam, fingerprinting and NYS Child Abuse Central Register clearance are required. Prerequisite(s): EDU 184  or permission of instructor.
  
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    EDU 285 Early Childhood Special Education: An Introduction

    Credits: (3)
    This course provides an introduction to special education in early childhood and the early primary grades. The legal foundation of special education, public laws, the New York State Special Education process and contemporary models and issues in the field of special education will be examined. Students will explore the causes, characteristics and educational implications of disabilities. The course will also focus on selecting/modifying appropriate teaching strategies in inclusive early childhood environments and in early primary classrooms. Strategies for working effectively with families and early childhood special education professionals in the context of early childhood programs will also be examined. Exploration of personal competencies and ethical issues in special education will be explored. A field component is required. Prerequisite(s): EDU 182 , PSY 204  or permission of instructor.

Electrical Technology

  
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    ELT 101 Electrical Power Distribution and Overhead Construction

    Credits: (3)
    This course primarily deals with concepts and skills that are necessary for the construction and maintenance of overhead electric power distribution systems. Topics include: safety, performing construction from an overhead position on the distribution poles, use of ropes and rigging equipment, and operation and installation of transformers. The course is taught at the National Grid Training Laboratory in Liverpool. Two hours of lecture and two hours of laboratory.
  
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    ELT 120 Ethics in Engineering and Technology

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an investigation into fundamental ethical issues relating to the fields of engineering and technology. It will focus on organizing principles and ethical theory to frame problems that are typically encountered in the engineering industry. Topics to be discussed include: professional responsibility and accountability; honesty and integrity in the workplace; intellectual property; conflicts of interest; environmental issues; risk, safety and product reliability; legal liability; and diversity in the workplace. Contemporary case studies will be examined and debated in the context of such traditional philosophical schools of thought as Utilitarianism and Kantian ethics. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ELT 141 Circuits I

    Credits: (4)
    Course topics include the introduction and use of DC and AC voltage sources, along with resistors, capacitors and inductors in series, parallel and series/parallel circuits. Circuits are analyzed using Ohm’s Law, Watt’s law, Kirchhoff’s current and voltage laws. The course concludes with the application of these basic concepts to high-pass, low-pass, band-pass and band-reject filters. Laboratory exercises emphasize the construction, analysis, measurement and trouble shooting of basic RLC circuits using state of the art laboratory equipment. Thevenin’s theorem, Norton’s theorem, transformers, the use of algebra, complex numbers, engineering notation and the use of scientific calculators are also covered. Prerequisite(s): MAT 114  or equivalent. Lecture hours and lab hours are required for this course.
  
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    ELT 142 Circuits II

    Credits: (4)
    This is an advanced course in DC and AC circuit theory. Topics addressed in this course review and expand on the concepts from Circuits I (ELT 141 ). New topics include Thevenin’s, Norton’s and superposition theorems, mesh and nodal analysis, magnetism, and fundamental power concepts. Laboratory exercises emphasize circuit construction, analysis and measurement using advanced laboratory equipment. Lecture hours and laboratory hours are required for this course. Prerequisite(s): Completion of ELT 141  with a grade of C or better.
  
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    ELT 161 Electronics I

    Credits: (4)
    Introduction to semiconductor theory, devices, and circuits. Devices include: rectifier, zener, light emitting, special diodes, and BJT transistors. Circuits include: power supplies, wave forming, switching, amplifiers, and regulators. Integrated circuits include: voltage regulators and operational amplifiers. Prerequisite(s): ELT 141  and MAT 143 , or equivalent.
  
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    ELT 201 Power Technology

    Credits: (4)
    This course is an overview of the electric power system from generation to transmission, distribution, and delivery of electric power. Topics include: methods of generating electricity such as hydro, thermal coal, thermal nuclear, solar and gas turbine; transmission system voltages and construction; Wye and Delta distribution systems; transformers, single phase and three phase banks for common delivery voltages; electric service construction and building wiring methods; and electric safety. The course is taught at the National Grid Training Laboratory in Liverpool. Prerequisite(s): ELT 101  Prerequisite(s)/Co-requisite(s): MAT 088  or permission of instructor.
  
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    ELT 215 Programmable Logic Controllers

    Credits: (4)
    This course will introduce students to the basic principles that govern the function and operation of the programmable logic controller (PLC). It focuses on the common input and output devices that are typical in sequential and process control applications. Topics include: PLC applications, logic concepts and ladder diagrams, CPU, memories, input/output devices, safety issues, maintenance techniques, I/O and memory addressing, ladder logic programming language, design of relay operated process, and proper installation methods. Prerequisite(s): CMT 171  and ELT 141 , or permission of instructor. Three lecture hours and a three-hour laboratory.
  
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    ELT 221 Home Technology Integration

    Credits: (4)
    This course explores devices, communication systems and protocols (Home Area Network) used at the consumer’s home or small business with emphasis on energy management. It includes the use of home alternative energy sources, smart meters and connection to the grid. The course includes planning, implementation and management of HTI systems. Prerequisite(s): ELT 141  and CMT 171 . Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week.
  
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    ELT 222 Introduction to Alternative Residential Energy Systems

    Credits: (4)
    Students practice the analysis and application of physical level services and methodologies as applied to residential alternative energy sources. Topics include power requirement estimation, solar, wind, and hydrogen fuel cell technologies as well as geothermal heating and cooling. Cost analysis and the time required to “break-even” are also included. Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week. Prerequisite(s): ELT 161 .
  
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    ELT 261 Electronic Circuits II

    Credits: (4)
    This course covers circuits with active devices and electronic amplifier circuit concepts including voltage and current sources, gain, attenuation, I/O impedances, frequency response, multistage effects, and decibel math. Devices studied are BJT and FET transistors, LEDs and opto-isolators, thyristors, integrated op-amps, instrumentation amplifiers, 555-timers, and selected ICs. Prerequisite(s): Completion of ELT 161  with a grade of C or better. Three class hours and three laboratory hours per week.
  
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    ELT 265 Communication Systems

    Credits: (4)
    Radio communications circuits and systems, including: tuned amplifiers, mixers, carrier signal modulation, transmission, and demodulation, transmission lines and antennas. Emphasis is on circuits and concepts common to many types of systems. Circuits of super heterodyne receiver systems are investigated in the laboratory. Three class hours and a three-hour laboratory. Prerequisite(s): ELT 142  Co-requisite(s): ELT 261 
  
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    ELT 285 Power Systems I

    Credits: (4)
    This course is a review of AC circuit concepts including Kirchhoff’s Laws, vector algebra, phasor diagrams, magnetism, and transformer operation. It also covers poly-phase systems including three phase generation, wye and delta connections, as well as AC and DC rotating machinery. Prerequisite(s): Completion of ELT 141  with a grade of C or better or permission of instructor. Three class hours and a three-hour laboratory.
 

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