Sep 20, 2018  
College Catalog 2018-2019 
    
College Catalog 2018-2019

Course Descriptions


 

Nutrition

  
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    NTR 218 Nutrition/Diet Therapy

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a study of nutrition as it relates to normal growth, development, health and disease conditions. The student will study how nutrient intake can impact body systems and processes. Therapeutic diets for specifics disease conditions will also be covered.

Nursing

  
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    NUR 165 Critical Thinking and the Nursing Process

    Credits: (1)
    This course is designed to assist students in developing critical thinking skills utilizing the nursing process. This course will progress from the simple to the more complex utilizing medical/nursing terminology and various nursing care case studies.
  
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    NUR 180 Fundamental Competencies in Nursing Process

    Credits: (1)
    This level 1 nursing course introduces the concepts essential for applying human needs theory in the clinical setting at the novice level. Concepts stressed are: an effective approach to learning; the role of the nurse within the health care system; problem solving/introduction to the Nursing Process; and introduction to human needs theory. Students will also begin to utilize and apply critical thinking skills; use of technology and informatics; therapeutic communication skills; diversity awareness and a professional identity. Demonstration of the application of these concepts in the clinical setting is a requirement of NUR 180. The final grade in NUR 180 is dependent on successful completion of all Level 1 requirements. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 181 Fundamental Concepts of Activity and Rest

    Credits: (1)
    In this course students apply the nursing process in the human needs area of activity and rest. Students are introduced to the client’s need of alternating periods of activity and rest. Students learn principles of body mechanics/alignment and safe patient handling. Students also learn to assess activity and rest needs and to provide for these needs by assisting clients to move safely and effectively, by performing range of motion exercises, through effective positioning, and by implementing nursing strategies to promote sleep. Students learn to assess skin integrity and provide interventions to promote effective hygiene including oral care, skin care, bathing, and bed making. Factors of growth and development, culture, spirituality, and ethnicity are considered in context. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 182 Fundamental Concepts of Oxygenation and Perfusion

    Credits: (1)
    The student will use the nursing process in the human needs area of basic oxygenation. This course introduces students to the need for adequate oxygen supply to maintain cellular metabolism, and to the interrelationship of respiratory and cardiovascular function in maintaining oxygen supply. Students learn to assess oxygenation status, plan and implement measures to promote respiration/ventilation and circulation, and evaluate their effectiveness. Students learn to assess oxygenation status including normal breath sounds, blood pressure, temperature, peripheral pulses, respiration, and oxygenation saturation. Measures learned to promote respiration/ventilation include use of aerosol medications, oxygenation administration, non-invasive ventilation aides, and breathing exercises. Measures learned to promote circulation are application of anti-embolic and sequential compression stockings, and exercise. Students learn professional responsibility in obtaining and reporting basic respiratory and cardiac findings. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 183 Fundamental Concepts of Safety and Security

    Credits: (1)
    In this course, students apply the nursing process in the human needs area of safety and security. Students are introduced to potential environmental and biologic threats to the well-being of the individual such as tissue injury and infection. Nursing assessments and interventions to minimize threats, provide a safe environment, and promote healing, such as medical asepsis, isolation, surgical asepsis, wound care, heat and cold therapy, and a safe process to administer medications, are included. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 184 Fundamentals of Nutrition/Elimination and Fluid/Electrolyte

    Credits: (1)
    The course introduces assessments and skills such as: utilizing informatics and technology in the monitoring of intake and output and managing a patient receiving enteral tube feedings and intravenous therapy. This level one nursing course assists students in learning basic nursing care. Readings, videos and laboratory small groups are used to help the student to critically think about the assessment of their patients’ fluid, electrolyte and acid- base balance. In unit two, the focus switches to normal adult nutritional needs including nasogastric tubes used for feedings and stomach decompression. Areas of special concern to nurses are highlighted such as assessing patient readiness for diet progression. Units three and four focus on basic assessments and measures to promote the hospitalized person’s elimination. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 185 Fundamental Concepts of Psychosocial Needs and Communication

    Credits: (1)
    Students apply the nursing process concepts of assessment, diagnosing, planning, intervention, and evaluation in the area of psychosocial needs. They learn open-ended data-gathering and relationship development techniques that meet patients’ psychosocial needs. At the same time the students are meeting their own professional need of compiling a broad, accurate database. Further application of the nursing process in the area of psychosocial needs aids in the identification of direct and indirect expressions of feelings. Thus the student develops supportive communication skills that insure patient-centered care for a diverse population even when involved with difficult situations and or difficult patients. Students explore the nature and goals of the professional relationship and learn communication techniques to use when interacting with members of the health care team. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 191 Introduction to Nursing Process

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to master basic nursing skills in a simulated clinical setting under the guidance of the instructor in preparation for nursing care in the hospital setting. The student will begin to utilize the steps of the nursing process (assessing, planning, implementing, and evaluating) in conjunction with these nursing skills. The student will consider cost effectiveness in utilizing lab materials and learn to use channels of communication. The student will use appropriate terminology, apply theory in performance of skills, work in groups, and use self-evaluation. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 192 Introductory Nursing Process Clinical I

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to apply theory and skills mastered to date while familiarity with the hospital environment, equipment, and personnel is achieved. The student will utilize the nursing process and collaborate with the instructor to plan for the care of one hospitalized adult patient in an acute care setting. The student will seek out the instructor for guidance and assistance as appropriate and will maintain hospital and nursing standards. Additionally, the student will assume accountability for their own learning, their assessment findings and the patient care they provide to achieve clinical proficiency at Level 1. The student will complete a self-evaluation after each clinical day consider their performance and the quality of the patient care they provided. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 193 Extended Nursing Process Clinical I

    Credits: (2)
    These courses provide an opportunity for the student to have additional experience in the hospital setting to achieve clinical proficiency at Level 1. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 194 Extended Nursing Process Clinical I

    Credits: (2)
    These courses provide an opportunity for the student to have additional experience in the hospital setting to achieve clinical proficiency at Level 1. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 199 Elective Nursing Process Clinical I

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides opportunities for the student to have clinical experiences to work on personal objectives and/or those beyond the scope of basic preparation. These experiences will allow the student to be supervised in the clinical setting in order to gain additional experiential knowledge, enhance skills learned, and/or validate maintenance of skills. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 206 Childbearing Family

    Credits: (1)
    This course focuses on the use of the nursing process for both the normal and high risk patient/family in various phases of the childbearing process - prenatal, labor, delivery, and postpartum. The prenatal course will be viewed from both the maternal and fetal perspectives and includes the dynamic physiologic, psychosocial, and emotional adaptations. The student will also learn to assess the postpartum woman, the newborn, and the family unit. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 207 Childrearing Family

    Credits: (1)
    This course focuses on the use of the nursing process to understand childhood physiologic alterations. The concepts of the nursing process are expanded to enable students to understand planned and implemented care that will meet the needs of the child and their family throughout the course of a child’s illness. The student will apply the nursing process with identification and reporting of child abuse and maltreatment. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 220 Application of Competencies in Nursing Process

    Credits: (1)
    This course introduces the concepts essential for applying Level 2 human needs theory in the clinical setting. The five phases of the nursing process are studied individually, cultural and spiritual differences are explored, and basic concepts of growth and development are studied. Students will continue to apply critical thinking skills, use of technology, communication skills, and understanding of professional integrity in caring for patients throughout the life span from life to death. The concepts of loss of health and life are introduced. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner: however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study for theory and procedure components. Demonstration of the application of these concepts in the clinical setting is a requirement of NUR 220. The final grade in NUR 220 is dependent on successful completion of all Level 2 requirements. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 222 Application of Concepts of Oxygenation and Perfusion

    Credits: (1)
    This course builds on previous learned theory to prepare students to develop and utilize the nursing process with acute and chronic respiratory and circulatory physical assessment for the diverse population. Assessments of normal and abnormal heart and lung sounds are taught, as well as basic electrocardiogram interpretation and technology. Students will also develop and utilize basic assessment of peripheral vascular function and tissue perfusion. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner, however, it is expected that the student will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 223 Application of Concepts of Safety and Security

    Credits: (1)
    This course covers various aspects of nursing care and utilization of the nursing process related to a person’s surgical experience, persons experiencing pain, and persons with cancer. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner, however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 224 Application of Nutrition/Elimination and Fluid/Electrolytes

    Credits: (1)
    This course provides information to teach the student the utilization of critical thinking in the application of the nursing process to care for patients with abnormal fluid, electrolyte and acid-base imbalance and altered nutrition and elimination needs. Appropriate nutrition and elimination interventions to diverse populations with particular clinical problems are defined. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 231 Nursing Process Clinical II

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to apply theory and skills mastered to date. The student functions in collaboration with the instructor to plan for the day of care for hospitalized adults, recognizing diverse characteristics. The student depends on the instructor for guidance with interactions with members of the healthcare team and seeks assistance when appropriate. The student depends on the instructor for guidance to maintain standards, develop relationships, and assume accountability for learning and self-evaluation. The student utilizes the nursing process to perform ongoing assessments, identify problems, select nursing diagnosis, plan, implement and evaluate care of the day. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 232 Nursing Process Clinical II

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to apply theory and skills mastered to date. The student functions in collaboration with the instructor to plan for the day of care for hospitalized adults, recognizing diverse characteristics. The student depends on the instructor for guidance with interactions with members of the healthcare team and seeks assistance when appropriate. The student depends on the instructor for guidance to maintain standards, develop relationships, and assume accountability for learning and self-evaluation. The student utilizes the nursing process to perform ongoing assessments, identify problems, select nursing diagnosis, plan, implement and evaluate care of the day. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 233 Extended Nursing Process Clinical II

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to apply theory and skills mastered to date. The student functions in collaboration with the instructor and members of the nursing team to plan for the day of care for hospitalized adults, recognizing diverse characteristics. The student functions in collaboration with the instructor, acts as a patient advocate, exercises beginning independence with interpersonal interactions, and seeks assistance from the instructor and other members of the nursing team when appropriate. The student exercises beginning independence to maintain standards, develop relationships, and assume accountability for learning and self-assessment. The student utilizes the nursing process to perform ongoing assessments, identify problems, select nursing diagnosis, plan, implement and evaluate care for the day. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight-week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 234 Extended Nursing Process Clinical II

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to apply theory and skills mastered to date. The student functions in collaboration with the instructor and members of the nursing team to plan for the day of care for hospitalized adults, recognizing diverse characteristics. The student functions in collaboration with the instructor, acts as a patient advocate, exercises beginning independence with interpersonal interactions, and seeks assistance from the instructor and other members of the nursing team when appropriate. The student exercises beginning independence to maintain standards, develop relationships, and assume accountability for learning and self-assessment. The student utilizes the nursing process to perform ongoing assessments, identify problems, select nursing diagnosis, plan, implement and evaluate care for the day. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight-week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 236 Transition Course for Advanced Placement Students

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides an opportunity for the LPN student with prior nursing credits to consolidate and refine previously learned theory and skills, while emphasizing the underlying rationale and principles. It may also be offered to transfer nursing students upon faculty approval. Under the guidance of the instructor in a simulated clinical setting, the principles of the nursing process are applied. Opportunities are provided for the returning student to reduce the stress of re-entering school, to positively reinforce gained knowledge, and form support groups by focusing on the skills needed for interpersonal relationships. Appropriate clinical placement will be determined at the end of this experience. Students will spend a total of 56 hours in eight lab sessions in introductory clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for each session. Prerequisite(s): NUR major and permission of instructor; LPN License or transfer equivalent of first semester per Registered Nurse program; co-requisites: completed and current health form on file, current CPR certification, malpractice insurance, NUR 180 , NUR 185 , required performance skills. Co-requisite(s): completed and current health form on file, current CPR certification, malpractice insurance, NUR 180 , NUR 185 , required performance skills.
  
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    NUR 237 Extended Nursing Process III

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides opportunities for the student to have clinical experiences to demonstrate ongoing mastery of Level 3 theory. These experiences will allow the student to be supervised in the clinical setting in order to gain additional experiential knowledge, enhance skills learned, and/or validate ongoing acquisition of skills in Level 3 nursing. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 238 Extended Nursing Process III

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides opportunities for the student to have clinical experiences to demonstrate ongoing mastery of Level 3 theory. These experiences will allow the student to be supervised in the clinical setting in order to gain additional experiential knowledge, enhance skills learned, and/or validate ongoing acquisition of skills in Level 3 nursing. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 239 Elective Nursing Process Clinical II

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides opportunities for the student to have clinical experiences to work on personal objectives and/or those beyond the scope of basic preparation. These experiences will allow the student to be supervised in the clinical setting in order to gain additional experiential knowledge, enhance skills learned, and/or validate maintenance of skills. Student will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight-week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 240 Expanding Competencies in Nursing Process

    Credits: (1)
    NUR 240 introduces the concepts essential for applying Level 3 theory in the clinical setting. The student will focus assessing and planning care for families in the acute care setting and in the community. Students will apply and analyze critical thinking skills, use of technology, communication skills, diversity, and professional integrity as they apply to the family unit. Issues of Family Assessment, Family Reproductive Health, and Death and Loss are explored. Skills in documenting the nursing process via obtaining a health care history, initiating the nursing care plan or referral and completing a discharge/transfer summary are introduced. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study for the theory and procedure components. Demonstration of the application of these concepts in the clinical setting is a requirement of NUR 240. The final grade in NUR 240 is dependent on successful completion of all Level 3 requirements. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing, and BIO 171  and BIO 172  with a C+ or higher.
  
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    NUR 243 Pharmacology in Nursing

    Credits: (1)
    In this course, students use the nursing process to safely administer medications. Students are introduced to the study of drugs, how the drugs act, and how the drugs move through the body along with a format to organize drug information for both general classifications of medication and specific medications. Major drug classifications are covered. Drug actions, common side effects, contraindications, drug-drug interactions and nursing implications are presented for each classification. The generic name, trade name, usual route(s), and safe dosage parameters for prototype drugs and/or commonly prescribed specific medications are highlighted. Medication errors are studied and safe medication administration is the focus. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner, however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.
  
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    NUR 245 Expanded Concepts of Psychosocial Needs: Maladaptive Behavior I

    Credits: (1)
    This course covers concepts of the nursing process and therapeutic communication with patients experiencing severe mental/emotional disorders likely to be seen in the acute care psychiatric setting: mood disorders and thought disorders. In addition, the course will teach assessments and interventions related to psychiatric emergencies including threatening/assault behavior and suicide. The course will explore professional, ethical and legal issues related to mental-health nursing. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 248 Expanded Concepts of Gerontologic and Palliative Care: Needs of the Older Adult and the Terminally Ill Patient

    Credits: (1)
    This course is divided into two components. The first component includes didactic theory to assist the student with assessing and planning to meet the complex needs of the older adult patient in community-based or in institutional health care settings. The second component of the course provides information to assist students with the application of the nursing process in meeting the end-of-life needs for patients who are terminally ill. Leadership and communication issues are addressed in developing a collaborative, multidisciplinary care plan. Concepts of professional values, including integrity, accountability, and advocacy, will be emphasized within the context of carrying out the roles of patient educator and coordinator of care. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity.  Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing .
  
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    NUR 253 Safety in Med Administration: Pharmacology for Nurses

    Credits: (3)
    This course focuses on safety issues involved in administering medications in a clinical setting. It covers drug classifications and the effects of that classification on the body systems. The student will be introduced to the basics of pharmacology and how the drugs work right down to the cellular level. This detailed information will make client assessments more meaningful. Case scenarios describing actual medication errors will follow each classification studied. In addition to drug classification, medical calculations, legal aspects, and safety issues will be presented. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours per credit hour in study and online activity. Prerequisite(s): Health care experience or current Nursing  student.
  
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    NUR 255 Specialty Care Clinical III: Psychiatric Nursing

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to apply theory and skills mastered to date and to implement new theory and skills learned in the psychiatric client needs course. The student collaborates with the instructor, members of the nursing team and the client within the context of family regarding care needs. The student exercises limited independence in collaboration with other members of the health care team to act as a client advocate. The student exercises limited independence to maintain standards, develop relationships, and assume accountability for learning and self-evaluation. The student utilizes the nursing process to perform ongoing assessments that include the family, to select nursing diagnoses, to plan care that incorporates principles of teaching/learning, and to implement and evaluate client and family-centered care. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing .
  
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    NUR 256 Specialty Care Clinical III: Childbearing Family Nursing

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to apply theory and skills mastered to date and to implement new theory and skills learned in the childbearing family needs courses. The student collaborates with the instructor, members of the nursing team, the client and the family regarding care needs.  The student exercises limited independence in collaboration with other members of the health care team to act as a client advocate.  The student exercises limited independence to maintain standards, develop relationships, and assume accountability for learning and self- evaluation. The student utilizes the nursing process to perform ongoing assessments that include the family, to select nursing diagnoses, to plan care that incorporates principles of teaching/learning, and to implement and evaluate client and family-centered care. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing .
  
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    NUR 257 Specialty Care Clinical III: Childrearing Family Nursing

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to apply theory and skills mastered to date and to implement new theory and skills learned in the childrearing family needs courses. The student collaborates with the instructor, members of the nursing team, the client and the family regarding care needs. The student exercises limited independence in collaboration with other members of the health care team to act as a client advocate. The student exercises limited independence to maintain standards, develop relationships, and assume accountability for learning and self- evaluation. The student utilizes the nursing process to perform ongoing assessments that include the family to select nursing diagnoses, to plan care that incorporates principles of teaching/learning, and to implement and evaluate client and family-centered care. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day.  Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing .
  
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    NUR 258 Specialty Care Clinical III: Geriatric And Palliative Care Nursing

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to apply theory and skills mastered to date and to implement new theory and skills learned in the geriatric and palliative care nursing needs course. The student collaborates with the instructor, members of the nursing team and the client within the context of family regarding care needs. The student exercises limited independence in collaboration with other members of the health care team to act as a client advocate.  The student exercises limited independence to maintain standards, develop relationships, and assume accountability for learning and self- evaluation. The student utilizes the nursing process to perform ongoing assessments that include the family, to select nursing diagnoses, to plan care which incorporates principles of teaching/learning, and to implement and evaluate client and family-centered care. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing .
  
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    NUR 259 Elective Nursing Process Clinical III

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides opportunities for the student to have clinical experiences to work on personal objectives and/or those beyond the scope of basic preparation. These experiences will allow the student to be supervised in the clinical setting in order to gain additional experiential knowledge, enhance skills learned, and/or validate maintenance of skills in Level 3 nursing. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day.  Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 260 Advanced Competencies in Nursing Process

    Credits: (1)
    NUR 260 introduces the concepts essential for applying Level 4 theory in the clinical setting. The course explores the discipline of nursing and factors that impact on the profession of nursing including historical perspectives; educational, ethical and legal issues; modes of health care delivery and nursing roles; application of the nursing process in the management of patient care; and professional trends and issues in leadership and management. Evaluation of  ways in which health care delivery trends impact on current and future nursing practice and intervene to main the standard of practice will be explored. This course will demonstrate the interdependent relationship of leadership and management by defining the leadership components and management functions inherent in all phases of the management process. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Demonstration of the application of these concepts in the clinical setting is a requirement of NUR 260. The final grade in NUR 260 is dependent on successful completion of all Level 4 requirements. Prerequisite(s): BIO 171  and BIO 172  (for advanced standing students), and matriculation in Nursing .
  
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    NUR 261 Advanced Concepts of Activity and Rest

    Credits: (1)
    This course provides the key concepts necessary to develop a plan of care for individual or groups of patients with activity and rest needs related to disorders of the musculoskeletal system. The course will cover advanced techniques for the assessment of this system. Principles of nursing care are emphasized for patients undergoing orthopedic interventions or who are affected by chronic or acute musculoskeletal disease or deformity. Management of care issues will be explored in the context of current professional standards and evidence-based practice. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 262 Advanced Concepts of Oxygenation and Perfusion

    Credits: (1)
    This course provides a focus in the application of the nursing process with patients diagnosed with an acute/chronic oxygenation conditions related to upper and lower respiratory tract disturbances. In addition, application of the Nursing Process with patients experiencing compromised oxygenation related to vascular and peripheral circulation disorders, cardiac disorders and hematologic disorders is covered. Students will demonstrate ability to critically think when monitoring, managing, and assessing patients experiencing advanced cardiac arrhythmias and cardiac conduction conditions. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 263 Advanced Concepts of Safety and Security

    Credits: (1)
    This course provides the opportunity for the student to focus on the use of the nursing process and adaptive communication for the commonly occurring pathological conditions of the Nervous system, the Immune system, and the special senses (vision and hearing). Emphasis will be placed on using critical thinking and leadership principles to apply necessary theory knowledge in assessing, planning, implementing (including the use of technology), and evaluating care for patients with these dysfunctions. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 264 Advanced Concepts of Nutrition/Elimination and Fluid/Electrolyte

    Credits: (1)
    In this course, the nursing process is applied to patients with illness­es that interfere with nutrition, elimination, or fluid, electrolyte, and acid- base balance. Nursing interventions are reviewed and include the use of current technology. The planning focuses on the entire episode of illness across the continuum of care; considering the teaching and home-health maintenance needs of a diverse population. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 265 Expanded Concepts of Psychosocial Needs: Maladaptive Behavior II

    Credits: (1)
    This course will cover concepts necessary for management of care for diverse patients experiencing men­­tal/emotional disor­ders that may be seen in a variety of set­tings that offer acute inpatient care or community out-patient psychiatric settings. Disorders taught include addiction, eating disor­ders, personality disorders, and psychotic disorders in the seriously and persistently mentally ill or homeless patients. Time required for completion of this course is dependent on the individual learner; however, it is expected that students will spend at least 45 hours in study and classroom activity. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 271 Advanced Nursing Process Clinical IV

    Credits: (2)
    This clinical course provides an opportunity for the student to consolidate theory and skills developed in previous levels and to implement new Level 4 theory and skills. The student functions in collaboration with members of a diverse multidisciplinary health care team, to provide care for hospitalized patients with complex needs. He/she will function interdependently to establish priorities for a group of patients, to delegate and assist others with aspects of nursing care, and to provide for continuity of care, discharge planning and referrals. The level-4 student also functions interdependently to maintain standards, to develop relationships, and to assume responsibility for self and others. The student applies the nursing process considering previous illness, to develop and implement a plan of care for a group of patients. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 272 Extended Advanced Nursing Process Clinical IV

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides opportunities for the student to have clinical experiences to demonstrate ongoing mastery of Level 4 theory. These experiences will allow the student to be supervised in the clinical setting in order to gain additional experiential knowledge, enhance skills learned, and/or validate ongoing acquisition of skills in Level 4 nursing. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day.  Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 273 Extended Advanced Nursing Process Clinical IV

    Credits: (2)
    This course provides opportunities for the student to have clinical experiences to demonstrate ongoing mastery of Level 4 theory. These experiences will allow the student to be supervised in the clinical setting in order to gain additional experiential knowledge, enhance skills learned, and/or validate ongoing acquisition of skills in Level 4 nursing. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day.  Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 279 Elective Nursing Process IV

    Credits: (2)


    This course provides opportunities for the student to have clinical experiences to work on personal objectives and/or those beyond the scope of basic preparation. These experiences will allow the student to be supervised in the clinical setting in order to gain additional experiential knowledge, enhance skills learned, and/or validate maintenance of skills in Level 4 nursing. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  

  
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    NUR 286 An International Service Learning Experience for Healthcare Students

    Credits: (3)
    This elective distributive clinical course will begin on campus during the second half of the semester for orientation and will culminate in an opportunity for students to explore diverse international healthcare practices while also participating in a service-learning project. Students will travel abroad, living amongst the indigenous people to gain a deeper understanding of how culture and socioeconomic conditions affect the health and well-being of the community through cultural immersion. There will be service learning opportunities for students such as building fuel-efficient stoves, observing and participating in community health teaching, touring a local clinic/pharmacy, meeting with local folk medicine experts and midwives, and possibly participating in home care visits within the community. Students will spend 19 hours on campus in orientation and learning theory with 65 hours in clinical practice activities during this 3 credit elective distributive clinical course. This course may be substituted for NUR 296  and/or NUR 297 . Co-requisite(s): Student must be matriculated in a healthcare program with priority registration given to nursing students.
  
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    NUR 291 Role Transition: Capstone Course

    Credits: (2)
    This clinical internship course is designed as a collaborative experience between nursing service and nursing education. It is a reality-based experience in which the student, in conjunction with a registered nurse preceptor, begins to function as a beginning staff nurse. The preceptor acts as a role model, teacher, and supervisor, and determines the pace and extent of assignments based on the student’s identified learning outcomes, the experiences available, and the student’s ability. The student is involved in a peer review process with the preceptor by maintaining and sharing a daily log, receiving formative feedback from which to identify learning needs and receiving summative feedback prepared by the preceptor at the conclusion of the experience. Students will spend a total of 56 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day.  Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 295 Distributive Care Clinical: Psychiatric Nursing

    Credits: (1)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to consolidate theory and skills developed in previous levels and to implement new theory and skills learned in the psychiatric client needs courses in settings not limited to acute care.  The student functions in collaboration with members of the health care team within the context of community based settings.  The student functions interdependently to maintain standards, to develop relationships, and to assume accountability.  The student applies the nursing process to perform assessments, select nursing diagnoses, and develop a plan for care. The distributive psychiatric clinical will involve the students in current issues of mental health as well as illness, getting a sense of psychiatric care needs in our community. Students will spend a total of 28 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 296 Distributive Care Clinical: Childbearing Family Nursing

    Credits: (1)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to consolidate theory and skills developed in previous levels and to implement new theory and skills learned in the childbearing family needs courses in settings not limited to acute care.  The student functions in collaboration with members of the health care team within the context of community based settings.  The student functions interdependently to maintain standards, to develop relationships, and to assume accountability.  The student applies the nursing process to perform assessments, select nursing diagnoses, and develop a plan for care. Students will spend a total of 28 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day.  Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 297 Distributive Care Clinical: Childrearing Family Nursing

    Credits: (1)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to consolidate theory and skills developed in previous levels and to implement new theory and skills learned in the childrearing family needs courses in settings not limited to acute care.  The student functions in collaboration with members of the health care team within the context of community based settings.  The student functions interdependently to maintain standards, to develop relationships, and to assume accountability.  The student applies the nursing process to perform assessments, select nursing diagnoses, and develop a plan for care. Students will spend a total of 28 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day.  Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  
  
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    NUR 298 Distributive Care Clinical: Geriatric and Palliative Care Nursing

    Credits: (1)
    This course provides an opportunity for the student to consolidate theory and skills developed in previous levels and to implement new theory and skills learned in the geriatric and palliative care nursing needs course in settings not limited to acute care. The student functions in collaboration with members of the health care team within the context of community based settings. The student functions interdependently to maintain standards, to develop relationships, and to assume accountability.  The student applies the nursing process to perform assessments, select nursing diagnoses, and develop a plan for care. Students will spend a total of 28 hours over an eight week time period in clinical practice activities; in addition, students will be expected to spend substantial time to prepare for and follow up after each clinical day. Prerequisite(s): Matriculation in Nursing.  

Physical Education

  
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    PED 101 Introduction to Physical Education, Sport and Kinesiology

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an overview of the history and foundations of physical education, sport and kinesiology. The various dimensions of these fields, including motor behavior, biomechanics, exercise physiology, sport sociology, health, fitness, sport psychology, teaching and coaching, are among the topics introduced. Students will develop a philosophy of the aims and objectives of physical education as a profession while beginning the process of personal career exploration and planning.
  
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    PED 201 Fundamentals of Exercise Science

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to the nature, scope, and scientific basis of exercise and sport science. The course is aimed at developing an understanding of the physiological adaptations to acute and long term physical training. An understanding of these adaptations is crucial for the physical educator, athletic trainer, coach, fitness expert, or exercise physiologist. Emphasis is placed on bioenergetics as well as circulatory, respiratory, and neuromuscular responses during rest, steady state, and exhaustive physical activity. An orientation to professional activities, opportunities, and professional competencies in the field will also be addressed. Prerequisite(s): BIO 171 .

Physical Education and Health

  
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    PEH 100 Lifetime Physical Wellness

    Credits: (1PE)
    This course will provide students with an overview of wellness and physical fitness principles. Through course lectures and participation, the course will enable the student to initiate and maintain a healthy lifestyle. Topics covered include: definitions of health, wellness and disease, components of physical fitness, proper nutrition for wellness and weight management, relaxation and stress management techniques, self-responsibility as it relates to personal health, prevention and care of common injuries, and wellness throughout the lifespan.
  
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    PEH 114 Horsemanship

    Credits: (1PE)
    This course will provide the student with a basic knowledge of proper horsemanship. Through lectures and actual riding lessons, the student will learn the proper techniques of caring for a horse, riding, etiquette, grooming, horse anatomy, and safety. The student will gain self-confidence for personal safety and riding enjoyment. In addition, the student will better understand the horse and how it functions, both mentally and physically. There is an additional fee per riding session for this class. Prerequisite(s): There are no prerequisites for this course.
  
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    PEH 120C Horsemanship II

    Credits: (1PE)
    This course is a natural progression from Horsemanship I. Through lectures and actual riding lessons, the student will enhance his/her understanding of the nature of horses and proper methods of caring for horses. They will identify different breeds, colors and markings. Advanced riding, handling, and grooming skills will be taught along with more detailed instruction on the care and structure of horses. There is an additional fee per riding session for this class. Prerequisite(s): PEH 114 , or the equivalent of 15 hours of riding instruction.
  
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    PEH 129 Tennis

    Credits: (1PE)
    This course is an introduction to the game of tennis with emphasis on learning and performing the basic skills which include: understanding rules and etiquette, choosing appropriate equipment, performing basic serves and strokes, tallying score during game play, and recognizing the benefits of tennis on overall wellness. Students must provide their own racquets. There is an additional fee to cover court rentals.
  
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    PEH 136 Aerobic Dance

    Credits: (1PE)
    A fun fitness program comprised of a variety of energetic dances that incorporate muscle toning, flexibility, balance, coordination and cardiovascular fitness. Course includes well-monitored workouts, beginning with slow, easy aerobics and working up to more vigorous routines.
  
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    PEH 139 Ballroom Dancing

    Credits: (1PE)
    Designed for the student who has had little or no background in ballroom dancing. The course will stress the development of basic rhythms in a variety of dances. It will teach the basic steps, patterns, and simple breaks of the dances involved. Finally, the course will stress good leading and following techniques so dancing can be an interpretive rather than a mechanical experience.
  
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    PEH 143 Skiing/Snowboarding

    Credits: (1PE)
    This course is designed to teach all levels of skiing or snowboarding, from beginner to competitive, depending on the individual. It includes instruction in the terminology and mechanics of skiing or snowboarding, individual and group practice techniques, trail navigation, safety, and care of equipment. Students may choose to learn either skiing or snowboarding. Additional fee required for single day season lift ticket. Additional fee for rental equipment (if needed).
  
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    PEH 145 Bowling

    Credits: (1PE)
    This course is an introduction to the sport of bowling with emphasis on learning and performing the basic skills of bowling, understanding rules and etiquette, choosing appropriate equipment, tallying score during game play, and recognizing the value of bowling on wellness. An additional fee is required for shoe rental and lane fees.
  
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    PEH 151 Karate

    Credits: (1PE)
    This course is designed to teach a basic knowledge of the techniques and philosophy of Karate. Prerequisite(s): There are no prerequisites to this course.
  
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    PEH 152 Tai Chi

    Credits: (1PE)
    Tai Chi is an ancient Chinese form of self-cultivation which originated as a martial art and is now studied primarily to develop and maintain physical and psychological well-being. The Standard 24 form is a beginning-level Tai Chi form which helps practitioners relax, focus, and improve their balance, and imparts a feeling of well-being. Prerequisite(s): There are no prerequisites for Tai Chi.
  
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    PEH 155 Yoga

    Credits: (1PE)
    An introduction to Yoga exercises. Course includes techniques of relaxation, breathing exercises, exercises in bending and stretching, asanas.
  
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    PEH 157 Golf

    Credits: (1PE)
    A course for the beginning golfer. Basic fundamentals of the game are stressed, along with various clubs and their uses, essential rules and etiquette, and some historical background on the origin of golf. Practical play at a local golf course is included. Additional fees required.
  
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    PEH 160 Basic Floor Pilates

    Credits: (1PE)
    This course is designed to give students an understanding of the history of pilates while providing a safe and balanced exercise program that includes training the core muscles as well as the whole body. Prerequisite(s): There are no prerequisites to this course.
  
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    PEH 163 Basic Weight Training for Life

    Credits: (1PE)
    This course is designed to give students the necessary techniques and knowledge to intelligently and safely pursue a program of weight training that will fit each student’s specific needs or desires. All areas of effective weight training will be covered including proper nutrition, proper aerobic, proper anaerobic, and essential biomechanics of exercise. Free weights and weight machines will be used. Prerequisite(s): There are no prerequisites to this course.
  
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    PEH 168 Volleyball

    Credits: (1PE)
    This course is an introductory volleyball class with an emphasis on learning and performing the basic skills of volleyball, understanding the rules of volleyball, applying learned skills in game play, and recognizing the value of volleyball for personal wellness.

Philosophy

  
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    PHI 101 The Examined Life: an Introduction to Philosophy

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to some of the main issues in Western philosophy. Students will be exposed to classic and contemporary writings from core areas of philosophy such as epistemology, metaphysics, philosophy of mind, philosophy of religion, social/political philosophy, and aesthetics. By critically evaluating the arguments that arise in these areas, students will develop a deeper understanding of the nature of philosophical inquiry. Emphasis will also be placed on how thinking philosophically can help us address many important contemporary issues.
  
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    PHI 102 History of Philosophy - Ancient

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to the problems of philosophy through the critical examination of the earliest developments of Western thought. Philosophers covered are: the Presocratics, Socrates, Plato, and Aristotle.
  
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    PHI 103 Critical Thinking

    Credits: (3)
    The aim of this course is to equip students with the capacity to critically consider various claims, arguments, and other purported reasons for belief and action. Students will learn to identify and construct arguments; discern whether the premises of arguments support their conclusions; and discover many common valid and invalid argument forms. Students will also learn to identify common logical fallacies in real-world examples; evaluate and construct arguments for should conclusions (e.g., arguments with the conclusion that such-and-such should be done); analyze analogies; and identify common heuristics and related cognitive biases.
  
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    PHI 104 History of Philosophy: Early Modern

    Credits: (3)
    An introductory course in which students will critically examine the problems of philosophy that were addressed by the major philosophical movements of 17th- and 18th-century Europe. Emphasis will be placed on issues in metaphysics and epistemology. Representative readings will be selected from among the works of Descartes, Malebranche, Leibniz, Spinoza, Bacon, Locke, Berkeley, Hume, Reid and Kant. Prerequisite(s): No Prerequisite.
  
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    PHI 105 Nineteenth Century Philosophy

    Credits: (3)
    This course is primarily concerned with the post-Kantian trends in the philosophy of 19th century Europe. Emphasis will be placed on the most conspicuous figures of this period including Hegel, Schopenhauer, Marx, Mill, Kierkegaard, and Nietzsche.
  
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    PHI 106 Twentieth Century Philosophy

    Credits: (3)
    Students will be introduced to major philosophical movements of the 20th century, which may include Analytic Philosophy, Existentialism, Phenomenology and Postmodernism through selected writings of such philosophers as Moore, Russell, Austin, Wittgenstein, Husserl, Heidegger, Sartre, Camus and Lyotard.
  
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    PHI 107 Logic

    Credits: (3)
    An introductory course in symbolic logic. Students will be introduced to the basic principles of logical analysis, including argument recognition, the distinction between deductive and inductive arguments, validity, and soundness. Students will also learn how to construct truth tables and proofs in propositional logic. The fundamentals of predicate logic will also be covered.
  
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    PHI 108 Ethics

    Credits: (3)
    An introduction to basic problems about the application of the concepts of right, wrong, good and bad to persons and their actions. Topics covered may include major ethical traditions, relativism and absolutism, morality and religion, and the foundations of moral obligation.
  
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    PHI 109 Philosophy of Religion

    Credits: (3)
    An introductory course examining issues in the traditions of western religious thought, e.g., proofs of the existence of God, the problem of evil, the relationship between religious belief and moral belief, religious experience and knowledge, immortality.
  
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    PHI 110 American Philosophy

    Credits: (3)
    This course is devoted to the investigation of characteristically American contributions to modern philosophy. It will examine how the issues of the great traditions of Western philosophy, including existence, knowledge, ethics, and politics, have been addressed by writers such as Emerson, Thoreau, Pierce, James, Dewey, Margaret Fuller, and also by Native American thinkers.
  
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    PHI 111 Philosophies of India

    Credits: (3)
    This course will explore the various philosophical traditions that have played a central role in India over the centuries, including the post-Vedic traditions, Buddhist philosophy, Jainism, Islamic philosophy, and Gandhi’s philosophy of non-violence (ahimsa). While many of these schools of thought are strongly associated with religious traditions, the course will focus on their philosophical aspects and arguments. Comparisons and contrasts to western philosophical traditions will be considered, though no previous experience with philosophy is required.
  
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    PHI 120 Ethics in Engineering and Technology

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an investigation into fundamental ethical issues relating to the fields of engineering and technology. It will focus on organizing principles and ethical theory to frame problems that are typically encountered in the engineering industry. Topics to be discussed include: professional responsibility and accountability; honesty and integrity in the workplace; intellectual property; conflicts of interest; environmental issues; risk, safety and product reliability; legal liability; and diversity in the workplace. Contemporary case studies will be examined and debated in the context of such traditional philosophical schools of thought as Utilitarianism and Kantian ethics. Prerequisite(s): ENG 103  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PHI 130 Environmental Ethics

    Credits: (3)
    This course introduces students to moral concepts that will help them understand humanity’s relationship with the natural world. The first part of the course considers the extent to which traditional moral concepts can be extended to non-human aspects of the world. Later, students will explore more non-traditional approaches to the issue, including biocentrism, ecocentrism, ecofeminism and Native American perspectives. Students will also have the opportunity to apply theoretical tools to an examination of some practical issues surrounding the environment and sustainability, such as global climate change, overpopulation and pollution.
  
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    PHI 206 Philosophy of Law

    Credits: (3)
    This course concerns the fundamental nature of law, and the relations between law and morality. It covers natural law, imperative and rule-based theories of the nature of law, and alternative statements of the justice of law. The philosophers covered in the course will include Aristotle, Aquinas, Austen, Hart and Rawls. Prerequisite(s): one prior course in PHI or permission of instructor.
  
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    PHI 210 Philosophy of Science

    Credits: (3)
    This course is concerned with the nature of scientific theories and the evidence for them, as well as the ways these theories develop and change. Examples of the sorts of problems to be considered are: the distinction between science and pseudo-science, the status of theoretical entities, confirmation and disconfirmation of theories, falsifiability, induction, explanation, empirical equivalence and underdetermination, and realism vs. antirealism about scientific theories. Examples of theories will be drawn from classical as well as contemporary science. Prerequisite(s): one prior PHI course or permission of instructor.
  
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    PHI 211 Metaphysics and Epistemology

    Credits: (3)
    This course will focus on a particular philosophical topic(s) in the area of metaphysics or epistemology, which are branches of philosophy concerned with fundamental questions about the nature of reality and our knowledge of it. Topics covered in this course might include: free will, philosophy of mind, skepticism or identity. Prerequisite(s): one prior course in PHI or permission of instructor.

Photography

  
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    PHO 100 Basic Photography

    Credits: (3)
    This black and white photography course is an introduction to basic digital camera techniques, aesthetics, and image editing software. Class time is a combination of lecture, demonstration, critique, and hands-on lab instruction. Regular projects, exams, and writing assignments will be given as appropriate to the discipline.
  
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    PHO 111 Digital Photography

    Credits: (3)
    This non-major course is designed to cover the basics of digital photography. Students will be introduced to digital camera functions. Assignments will address composition, design, color theory, and the history of photography to help students work creatively with their digital cameras. Students will be introduced to image editing software for color correction, image manipulation, and digital output. Class time will include lecture, demonstration, critique and hands-on digital lab instruction. Writing and reading assignments as appropriate to this discipline are part of this course. Students may have any digital camera but a digital SLR camera is preferred.
  
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    PHO 150 Black and White Photography II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is a study of advanced black and white photographic techniques and theory. Students will work digitally to produce a portfolio of images. Students will work through a series of assignments that will increase their understanding of the photographic medium. Class time will include lecture, demonstration, critique, and hands on digital lab instruction. Writing and reading assignments as appropriate to the discipline are part of this course. Students must have a digital SLR camera. Prerequisite(s): PHO 100 .
  
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    PHO 160 Color Photography I

    Credits: (3)
    This course will cover digital color photography including exposure, processing, printing, color theory, color management, and digital output. Aesthetics and communication will be stressed. Class time will include lecture, demonstration, aesthetic critique, and hands-on lab instruction. Writing and reading assignments as appropriate to this discipline are part of this course. Students must have a digital SLR camera. Prerequisite(s): PHO 100  or permission of department.
  
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    PHO 170 Studio Lighting and Techniques I

    Credits: (3)
    This course is designed to introduce students to the tools and practice of studio photography. Students will be introduced to medium format cameras, digital cameras, and tungsten and strobe lighting systems, as well as other lighting equipment. Class will focus on creation of black and white imagery with projects drawn from the following: advertising, portraiture, fashion, product photography, digital, architecture, and fine art. Students will develop a working knowledge of all the tools of the studio, as well as the ability to work knowledgeably in the crafting of effective lighting of all subject matter. Class time will include lecture, demonstration, critique, and hands-on digital laboratory and studio instruction. Writing and reading assignments as appropriate to this discipline are part of this course. Students must have a digital SLR camera. Prerequisite(s): PHO 150 .
  
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    PHO 200 Portfolio Preparation

    Credits: (1)
    Today’s art world demands a digital presence and an ability to communicate the visual arts electronically. This course will help students learn how to professionally photograph, scan and digitize their visual work. Students will work one-to-one with faculty to develop individually focused and discipline-specific portfolios. It will also model the type of communication that often takes place between artists, galleries, professors, community members and curators. It is recommended that students begin the course with a substantial body of work from a variety of artistic disciplines. This course will focus on sequencing and editing images for inclusion in a final portfolio, portfolio presentation models, and writing artist statements. Students will work to develop a comprehensive visual arts portfolio for submission for transfer applications. By the end of the course, students will have a digital representation of their portfolio to share and build upon in the future. The course is comprised of portfolio editing, written assignments, research, and project development. Prerequisite(s): ART/PHO majors or permission of instructor.
  
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    PHO 260 Color Photography II

    Credits: (3)
    This color photography course is an advanced, digital photography class. The course will build on the foundation created in PHO 160  for working with digital, color, photographic imagery. Students will create a portfolio of images. Students will work through a series of assignments that address digital camera operations, color correction, image manipulation, mastering color printing, and color management. Class time will include lecture, demonstration, critique and hands on digital lab instruction. Writing and reading assignments as appropriate to this discipline are part of this course. Students must have a digital SLR camera. Prerequisite(s): PHO 160 .
  
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    PHO 270 Studio Lighting and Techniques II

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an advanced studio photography class. Students will focus on effective use of medium format and digital cameras, as well as the full range of lighting equipment for work in color photography. Class will address advanced studio techniques and creative problem solving using digital methods. Assignments may include projects in advertising, portraiture, fashion, product photography, architecture, and fine art. Class time will include lecture, demonstration, critique, and hands-on digital laboratory and studio instruction. Writing and reading assignments as appropriate to this discipline are part of this course. Students must have a digital SLR camera. Prerequisite(s): PHO 170 .
  
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    PHO 271 Alternative Photographic Process

    Credits: (3)
    This course is an introduction to alternative photographic techniques and an expanded investigation of various modes of photographic presentation. Students will study techniques and photo processes ranging from the 19th century (such as cyanotype, and van dyke brown) to the most contemporary digital techniques with an eye toward adapting and combining various techniques for innovative personal expression. Students will be encouraged to move beyond the traditional presentation methods of photography and to devise presentation styles to match and augment their photographic content. Possibilities include: sequential imagery (book, video or digital), collage and montage, mixed media, wall hangings and sculptural and installation uses of photography. Class time will include lecture, demonstration, critique and hands-on, in-class projects. Writing and reading assignments as appropriate to the discipline are part of this course. Students must have an adjustable 35mm film camera and a digital SLR camera. Prerequisite(s): PHO 100  or permission of instructor.
  
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    PHO 272 Documentary Photography

    Credits: (3)
    This course allows students to investigate a range of topics and issues typical to the photojournalist. These may include: legal and ethical issues, news, spot news, portrait and action photography, travel imagery, picture editing, photography and writing, digital imagery and the extended documentary project. Class is designed to provide a solid introduction to the work of the photojournalist. Class time will include lecture, demonstration, critique and hands on digital lab instruction. Writing and reading assignments as appropriate to this discipline are part of this course. Students must have a digital SLR camera. Prerequisite(s): PHO 150  and ART 142 ; recommended: PHO 160 .
  
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    PHO 290 History of Photography

    Credits: (3)
    A survey of the history of photography, with concentration on selected major figures in photography from the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Class activities will include instructor’s presentations, student reports, field trips, guest presentations, and discussions based upon those activities and upon assigned readings in the history of photography.
  
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    PHO 291 Cooperative Education

    Credits: (3)
    The course is designed to provide work experience directly related to the student’s field of study. A learning contract, containing specific educational objectives related to the work experience and the student’s field of study, is developed by the student and the faculty co-op coordinator. Course requirements include a minimum of 180 hours of work in the student’s field of study, maintenance of a daily log of hours worked and duties performed, and a work-related final project or paper. This will allow the student to earn 3 credit hours. The student’s performance will be evaluated by the faculty co-op coordinator on the basis of the objectives in the initial learning contract and satisfactory evaluations by the employer. A letter grade will be assigned. Photography majors ONLY. Prerequisite(s): Approval by the Photography department.

Physics

  
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    PHY 100 Everyday Physics

    Credits: (3)
    An introductory, survey course in physics for non-science majors - not open to Math/Science majors. The objective of the course is to use the basic laws of physics to explain how things work. Using basic algebra, the student will learn how physics can explain the qualitative and quantitative nature of the interworking of common everyday objects that fail in one of the four major categories: transportation, athletic endeavors, the arts and the human body. Prerequisite(s): MAT 087  or higher.
  
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    PHY 103 General Physics I

    Credits: (4)
    The first semester of a two-semester, basic, non-calculus General Physics course emphasizing fundamental concepts and principles with a problem-solving approach. Topics covered include Kinematics and Dynamics, Newton’s Laws, Work and Energy, Momentum, Rotational Motion, Heat and Thermodynamics. A two-hour recitation session allows the opportunity to work on techniques of problem solving. Prerequisite(s): MAT 114  or higher. Two class hours, two recitation hours and two laboratory hours. Only four (4) credits in either PHY 103 or PHY 105  may be used toward degree requirements.
 

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